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View Full Version : Lone Planets “More Common Than Stars”



Fraser
2011-May-18, 08:10 PM
We happen to live in a solar system where everything seems to be tucked neatly in place. Sun, planets, moons, asteroids, comets… all turning and traveling through space in relatively neat and orderly fashions. But that may not always be the case; sometimes, it seems, planets can get kicked out of their solar systems entirely, [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/85781/lone-planets-more-common-than-stars/)

Amber Robot
2011-May-18, 09:10 PM
Could this just be the low-mass end of the IMF? The article seems to say so:

"But scientists suspect the gaseous bodies form more like stars than planets. These small, dim orbs, called brown dwarfs, grow from collapsing balls of gas and dust, but lack the mass to ignite their nuclear fuel and shine with starlight. It is thought the smallest brown dwarfs are approximately the size of large planets."

kzb
2011-May-19, 05:51 PM
Could this just be the low-mass end of the IMF? The article seems to say so:

"But scientists suspect the gaseous bodies form more like stars than planets. These small, dim orbs, called brown dwarfs, grow from collapsing balls of gas and dust, but lack the mass to ignite their nuclear fuel and shine with starlight. It is thought the smallest brown dwarfs are approximately the size of large planets."

The article actually implies that the majority of these free-floaters are ejected planets. I don't think it is the first time things like this have been observed. They've been observed in globular clusters previously.