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Tranquility
2004-Jun-09, 12:34 PM
How about we compile in this thread a list of the really good pics from the transit. There were quite a few really "artistic" images of the transit that I personally loved. Here's two of them:

1. This one is very beautiful. (http://users.skynet.be/walid/venus1.jpg). Personal favourite.

2. Close second (http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/06/08/science/20040608venus_bigf.jpg).

AK
2004-Jun-09, 01:22 PM
The APOD for today is a pretty nice one.

ToSeek
2004-Jun-09, 01:36 PM
Several good photos here. (http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~zhuxj/astro/html/venustransit04.html)

ngc3314
2004-Jun-09, 02:04 PM
How about we compile in this thread a list of the really good pics from the transit. There were quite a few really "artistic" images of the transit that I personally loved. Here's two of them:


To go from sublime to ridiculous - I can't resist popping up this shot which shows the only view from around here before third contact. And at that, Venus slipped through this slot in the clouds in about 30 seconds, but the dog looked at me quizzically for jumping and hooting all the same.

http://www.astr.ua.edu/keel/stargaze/transitcloud.jpg

That's Venus over near the right limb...

Normandy6644
2004-Jun-09, 02:23 PM
Several good photos here. (http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~zhuxj/astro/html/venustransit04.html)

Woah! That plane is huge! It's almost as big as Venus! :wink:

SiriMurthy
2004-Jun-09, 05:17 PM
Has anyone seen Mercury and Venus transits together? Technically it is possible. Has there been such an incident in recorded history? How often does that happen? :-k

Now, THAT would be a cool thing to see.

Bob B.
2004-Jun-09, 05:57 PM
Has anyone seen Mercury and Venus transits together? Technically it is possible. Has there been such an incident in recorded history? How often does that happen?
Are you sure it's possible? The ascending nodes of Mercury and Venus differ by about 28 degrees, which I think makes simultaneous transits impossible. It looks like transits of Venus occur in June and December, while transits of Mercury occur in May and November.

Of course the ascending nodes do change over long periods of time. It's possible simultaneous transits may have occurred in the distant past or will occur in the distant future, but not in our lifetimes.

SiriMurthy
2004-Jun-10, 08:27 PM
Has anyone seen Mercury and Venus transits together? Technically it is possible. Has there been such an incident in recorded history? How often does that happen?
Are you sure it's possible? The ascending nodes of Mercury and Venus differ by about 28 degrees, which I think makes simultaneous transits impossible. It looks like transits of Venus occur in June and December, while transits of Mercury occur in May and November.

Of course the ascending nodes do change over long periods of time. It's possible simultaneous transits may have occurred in the distant past or will occur in the distant future, but not in our lifetimes.

Since Mercury takes 0.241 years and Venus takes 0.615 years to complete a revolution, I was thinking that even though the ascending nodes differ greatly, there might be periods of overlap in their transits. Maybe, it's impossible (at least in out lifetimes) and that's why we haven't heard of such simultaneous transits. Maybe, an artificial satellite suitably positioned can catch that.

From what I remember reading on transits a long time ago, for a beyond-earth-orbit observer Earth-Venus simultaneous transit is more probable than Venus-Mercury transit.

Bob B.
2004-Jun-10, 09:56 PM
Since Mercury takes 0.241 years and Venus takes 0.615 years to complete a revolution, I was thinking that even though the ascending nodes differ greatly, there might be periods of overlap in their transits. Maybe, it's impossible (at least in out lifetimes) and that's why we haven't heard of such simultaneous transits.
The problem is that for an inferior planet to pass across the face of the Sun it cannot be more than 16 arc-minutes above or below the ecliptic as viewed from Earth. For Venus this means it must be within 192,000 km of the ecliptic, which occurs only when it is within 1.72 degrees of longitude from one of its nodes. For Mercury, it must be within 426,000 km of the ecliptic, which occurs only when it is within 3.44 degrees of longitude from one of its nodes. Since the nodes of Mercury and Venus are separated by 28.35 degrees, the planets cannot transit the Sun at the same time.

The above calculations are based on circular orbits. Taking eccentricity into consideration will no doubt change the numbers a bit, but not significantly so. I invite anyone to check my math (I’ve been known to make mistakes before).

Edited to add:
I'm sure it is theoretically possible for both planets to experience inferior conjunction at or near the same time, but most conjunctions don't result in a transit. Transits only happen when inferior conjunction occurs near one of the nodes; that's why they're so rare.

Edited again to add:
I've done some checking and have found that there were VERY closely spaced conjunctions of Mercury and Venus on 13-June-1988. Mercury reached inferior conjunction only about 6 hours after Venus.

John Dlugosz
2004-Jun-10, 10:25 PM
Tranquility, is there a higher-resolution version available? I'd like to print that out to hang up in my cube.

Wolverine
2004-Jun-11, 10:58 AM
There are many lovely shots of the transit, but thus far, these (http://vt-2004.solarphysics.kva.se/) are by far my personal faves. 8)

gethen
2004-Jun-11, 02:35 PM
2. Close second (http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/06/08/science/20040608venus_bigf.jpg).
Wow. I'd say that one does it for me. Pretty dramatic.

jt-3d
2004-Jun-11, 10:49 PM
Check out the new one at APOD (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040611.html).

Tranquility
2004-Jun-12, 12:57 AM
Tranquility, is there a higher-resolution version available? I'd like to print that out to hang up in my cube.

For which one?

John Dlugosz
2004-Jun-13, 05:28 AM
For which one?
Your "personal favorite".

Morrolan
2004-Jun-14, 10:37 AM
Check out the new one at APOD (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040611.html).

oh, wow... just wow... =D>

Wolverine
2004-Jun-14, 10:50 AM
Check out the new one at APOD (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040611.html).

Fantastic! =D>

Tranquility
2004-Jun-14, 12:37 PM
For which one?
Your "personal favorite".

Nope sorry that was the highest res image I found for it. But I'll try to look more for it though.

Mars
2004-Jun-14, 02:44 PM
It sure gives you an idea of just how massive our Sun is.

sarongsong
2004-Jun-16, 05:22 AM
Local club member Paul's results, fresh from his trip to England for the event:
http://www.lefevre.darkhorizons.org/ccdimaging/venustransit.htm

bbtuna
2004-Jun-16, 02:57 PM
Heres my pics form the transit. Hubby put them up for me. Sorry they are a little fuzzy, the camera it having issues and doesn't like to fucus all the time.

http://home.comcast.net/~love-goddess/Venus/Venus.html

Yes, that is me. I'm not a morning person, but I made myself get up and I dragged hubby along with me.

Hamlet
2004-Jun-16, 06:36 PM
Heres my pics form the transit. Hubby put them up for me. Sorry they are a little fuzzy, the camera it having issues and doesn't like to fucus all the time.

http://home.comcast.net/~love-goddess/Venus/Venus.html

Yes, that is me. I'm not a morning person, but I made myself get up and I dragged hubby along with me.

Your photos are very good. Well done! =D>

bbtuna
2004-Jun-16, 06:43 PM
Your photos are very good. Well done!

Thanks! Actually, I didn't take them, hubby did. I'll let him know. I just set them up. Not bad for only having the scope for 6 days either.

Bob B.
2004-Jun-20, 06:16 PM
Has anyone seen Mercury and Venus transits together? Technically it is possible. Has there been such an incident in recorded history? How often does that happen? :-k

Now, THAT would be a cool thing to see.
Yesterday I received the August issue of Sky & Telescope and on page 138 is the following article:


Will Mercury and Venus ever transit the Sun simultaneously?

Yes, but this will not happen until AD 69,163.

A transit can take place only when Mercury or Venus is near an ascending or descending node, meaning a crossing point of its orbit on the plane of the ecliptic. For this reason, transits of Mercury currently occur only in early May or mid-November, and those of Venus in early June or early December. Astronomers have long known that the longitudes of the nodes of both planets are slowly increasing and that Mercuryís nodes will catch up to and pass those of Venus in about 11,000 years. But until quite recently no one knew whether a simultaneous transit would ever occur.

The question has finally been answered by Jean Meeus and Aldo Vitagliano in the June 2004 Journal of the British Astronomical Association. Their calculation involved a numerical integration of the motions of all major bodies of the solar system. In addition to the Mercury-Venus transit of July 26, 69,163, they find that a total eclipse of the Sun will take place during the Venus transit of April 5, 15,232. (These dates are expressed in Dynamical Time; exact dates will depend on the changing length of Earthís day, which we canít know in advance, and on whatever calendar adjustments our descendants might make.)

--Roger W. Sinnott
So there you have your answer. Too bad we won't be around to see it.

Kaptain K
2004-Jun-21, 06:33 AM
Of course, that leads to the question: When was the last time that Venus and Mercury transited simultaneously?

Argos
2004-Jun-21, 02:00 PM
Have you seen this one? (http://www.spaceweather.com/venustransit/08jun04o/Maruska1_strip.jpg). The ISS transiting the Sun along with Venus.