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Kullat Nunu
2011-Jul-20, 02:01 PM
Courtesy to Hubble (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2011/23/). :clap:

Wonder how many are still lurking out there...

ravens_cry
2011-Jul-20, 02:16 PM
Hmm, I bet the orbits of smaller moons in a double planet system like Pluto and Charon must be quite intriguing. I hope New Horizons gets pictures of the newest member of the brood.

iquestor
2011-Jul-20, 02:55 PM
I for one am excited about new Horizons. I can't wait for it to arrive (July 2015) -- I'm sure it will get some awesome pictures and data of this system.

KaiYeves
2011-Jul-20, 06:04 PM
See, cheer up, little guy. When you were a planet, you only had one!

Noclevername
2011-Jul-20, 08:43 PM
See, cheer up, little guy. When you were a planet, you only had one!

:lol:

loglo
2011-Jul-20, 09:46 PM
Not bad for a runt! :)

slang
2011-Jul-20, 10:12 PM
I for one am excited about new Horizons. I can't wait for it to arrive (July 2015) -- I'm sure it will get some awesome pictures and data of this system.

We'll have to survive 2012 first. :)


See, cheer up, little guy. When you were a planet, you only had one!

:clap:

Lord Jubjub
2011-Jul-20, 10:19 PM
Anybody have suggestions for a name? Perhaps Persephone? or Eurydice?

Solfe
2011-Jul-20, 11:01 PM
Anybody have suggestions for a name? Perhaps Persephone? or Eurydice?

I missed this thread some how and created a different one.

I suggest "Tyson" after the mythological planet killer of the last decade. :)

DonM435
2011-Jul-21, 02:57 AM
I missed this thread some how and created a different one.

I suggest "Tyson" after the mythological planet killer of the last decade. :)

Bah! Tyson couldn't even beat Holyfield!

kzb
2011-Jul-21, 05:34 PM
Is Pluto a dwarf planet or more like a cloud of debris?

Grey
2011-Jul-21, 05:56 PM
Anyone know why Nix and Hydra are so bright in this image, while Charon is relatively dim? The discussion of the photo suggests that the colors are false, but not the brightness levels. In this image (http://www.jhuapl.edu/newscenter/pressreleases/2006/060622_image1.asp), from the discovery of Nix and Hydra, they're much fainter than Pluto and Charon, as I'd expect.

IsaacKuo
2011-Jul-21, 06:44 PM
The image is a composite of two different exposures. The middle bar with Pluto and Charon and no visible background noise is a shorter exposure, while the outer bars with the other moons are a longer exposure. It looks like this was necessary to let Charon be visible--otherwise it would have been lost in the cross shaped "glare" from Pluto.

Grey
2011-Jul-21, 08:00 PM
The image is a composite of two different exposures. The middle bar with Pluto and Charon and no visible background noise is a shorter exposure, while the outer bars with the other moons are a longer exposure. It looks like this was necessary to let Charon be visible--otherwise it would have been lost in the cross shaped "glare" from Pluto.That makes perfect sense. Thanks!

bunker9603
2011-Jul-25, 01:38 PM
Is there any chance that this 4th moon was recently captured by Pluto or has it been there all along and just never noticed? If it has been there since at least 1930 when Pluto was discovered, then is it a credit to technological advances?

kzb
2011-Jul-25, 05:00 PM
Is there any chance that this 4th moon was recently captured by Pluto or has it been there all along and just never noticed? If it has been there since at least 1930 when Pluto was discovered, then is it a credit to technological advances?

Apparently it is present on some images from 2006, but it was not recognised for what it was at the time.

It is in an orbital resonance with the other Pluto satellites, so I guess that means it's unlikely it's been captured since 1930.

Kullat Nunu
2011-Jul-28, 05:14 PM
The small moons are most probably debris from the collision that created the Pluto-Charon system, i.e. they are billions of years old.

If they were actually captured recently (say, millions of years ago), their orbits wouldn't be so regular. In addition, for an object like Pluto any way of getting moons other than giant impacts are rather unlikely.

The reason why they weren't spotted earlier is that they are *very* dim. Long exposures even on Hubble were needed in order to detect the new satellite.

Gsquare
2011-Aug-07, 11:47 PM
Anybody have suggestions for a name? Perhaps Persephone? or Eurydice?

Yeah, how about Popeye? Pluto was Popeye's dog , er,...remember? You do remember... ?? And Oilive Oil was his girl friend.....sooooo,,??
well, ...er, OK....sorry I mentioned it. :))

G^2

BTW, glad you guys never fell for that "Pluto is only an asteroid" heresy. :))

Solfe
2011-Aug-08, 12:17 AM
Don't cry Pluto, I'm not a planet either.

Kullat Nunu
2011-Aug-08, 05:54 PM
Pluto was Popeye's dog , er,...remember?

Sure about that? ;)

Gsquare
2011-Aug-09, 04:54 AM
Sure about that? ;)

Opps! My bad.
Pluto was Mickey Mouse's Dog!

Well, when you get to my age everything just blends together.. ;))...sort of like looking back in time at a galaxy 1 billion light yrs away through a 4 inch refractor using an eyepiece that gives 750 X. :)

Thanks for the correction....we should name Pluto's new moon MICKEY MOUSE!

mikeg64
2011-Aug-11, 05:39 AM
After managing to hold onto its satellites, does it still remain a dwarf planet?

Swift
2011-Aug-11, 12:33 PM
After managing to hold onto its satellites, does it still remain a dwarf planet?
There are asteroids with satellites, so I don't think that makes a difference.

Gsquare
2011-Aug-13, 01:47 AM
The reason why they weren't spotted earlier is that they are *very* dim. Long exposures even on Hubble were needed in order to detect the new satellite.

So you don't like my idea of Mickey Mouse??

OK; so there's only one possibility left that fits the bill for such a tiny moon.....Lets call it Plutonium !

Of all the common nuclear fuels it has the SMALLEST critical mass.

So lets take a vote:

All in favor of PLUTONIUM say: "Lets go Nuclear!"

.... :))

Romanus
2011-Aug-13, 03:12 PM
"Are you saying...that this sucker's nuclear?!"

"No! This sucker's electrical!"

[/end geekdom] ;)

Given that the other moons have "watery" names, it's pretty much a given that the name will be of some Greco-Roman water figure. I'm angling for Charybdis, though there are other names I like even more. I'd also like to add that this is a truly amazing discovery; this is basically a Phobos-sized object we're seeing across several billion kilometers.

Buttercup
2011-Aug-14, 01:42 AM
This is one of THE grooviest astronomy discoveries of 2011. :D

Four moons? Reinstate Pluto as a planet of our Solar System -- now!

dtilque
2011-Aug-15, 09:57 AM
How about Styx as a name for the moon? I can just see it in my Crystal Ball -- it's definitely not a Grand Illusion