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Superluminal
2004-Jun-17, 03:51 AM
I was just looking at the latest pics from Spirit. And I couldn't help but think how familiar looking the rocks were. But I couldn't remember why. Okinawa. A coral reef island. The rotten rocks reminded me of walking the beaches when I was stationed there in the AF. Of course I know I'm jumping to conclusions, but the area may have been a lake or shallow sea, just something to ponder. (Where's my ponder emoticon?)

StormSeeker
2004-Jun-17, 12:43 PM
They kind of remind me of pumice, but I'd bet their appeareance is due more to water erosion than vulcanism.

beskeptical
2004-Jun-20, 02:39 AM
http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpegMod/PIA06273_modest.jpgRight side, middle...why it's the ruins of a mini-city.http://www.planetsmilies.com/smilies/animal/2/animal05.gif

01101001
2004-Jun-20, 03:11 AM
[Rotten rocks] (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpegMod/PIA06273_modest.jpg)
By the way, for people who missed the press conference, I think it was Soderblom who commented upon them. The larger one like a loaf of bread with mostly crust remaining, is about the size of... a loaf of bread. The crust is probably mineralization of some sort. They are hypothesizing processes that would create that, volcanic, aeloian, but it was hard for them not to imagine that some water was not involved. They hope to find enough of the crusty material to put the chemical analysis tools on it. Sulfates? Just basalt? Carbonates?

The remarkable "cobra heads" (red-blue stereo anaglyph (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06286)) were next cited as probably similar crusty material, with the rock having eroded leaving some of the upper surface (and a support arm) of crust remaining. That relatively strong crust is so far a mystery.

beskeptical
2004-Jun-20, 05:21 PM
....... The crust is probably mineralization of some sort. They are hypothesizing processes that would create that, volcanic, aeloian, but it was hard for them not to imagine that some water was not involved. They hope to find enough of the crusty material to put the chemical analysis tools on it. Sulfates? Just basalt? Carbonates?

....... That relatively strong crust is so far a mystery.Aeolian (http://www.lukew.com/marsgeo/aeolian.html)
Your misspelling made it hard for me to find a meaning as I had to look it up.

Anyway, I'm curious which side of that structure gets more direct light. I would guess a solar action with the minerals to get a stronger crust. Air does dry out my bread crusts, but the Sun changes the surfaces of the rocks in the yard more than just air alone.