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Ricimer
2004-Jun-23, 07:27 PM
Okay, ToSeek's post got me thinking.

I need to find grad schools to apply to.

So where've you all been to, looked at, heard of, recommend etc...

BTW, if it matters, I am currently fascinated with stellar evolution/formation, and tracing it around in galaxies and such.

Normandy6644
2004-Jun-23, 08:32 PM
You should come hang with me up at Cornell. True, I'm still undergrad, but I'm gonna be in the astronomy department all the time. :D

ngc3314
2004-Jun-23, 08:46 PM
Okay, ToSeek's post got me thinking.

I need to find grad schools to apply to.

So where've you all been to, looked at, heard of, recommend etc...

BTW, if it matters, I am currently fascinated with stellar evolution/formation, and tracing it around in galaxies and such.

I put a list in a previous thread:

http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=12800

which will no doubt get me in the same trouble it did before. However, to the extent you have specific interests at this point, my major advice is to find people who work in this area and teach at a place with a grad program (which in fact need not even be labelled "Astronomy"), and consider these places. Of course, the larger and more diverse programs have advantages in case you make a mid-course trajectory changes. And for anyone out there especially interested in galaxy evolution, I could make a very specific grad-school recommendation...

Tobin Dax
2004-Jun-24, 12:11 AM
I do feel the need to tout my own university, since it wasn't included in ngc's list (and I turned down Colorado to come here). U of Illinois (at Urbana-Champaign) has a few people who study stellar evolution and/or formation. I suggest that you look at the department website, and you can investigate profs and research areas there. The addy is www.astro.uiuc.edu. If you think that you're interested in a prof's research, I 'd think that the best thing to do is e-mail them, but feel free to ask me any questions you have as well (or first ;) ).

Ricimer
2004-Jun-24, 03:45 PM
Tobin: I was this close (--) to going there myself. I have the student ID and everything.

Then they hung my financial aid package out to dry and I ended up enrolling at UNL (after the deadlines, that was interesting!).

NGC, thanks for the list.

All right, whats the specific recommendation? I like how things change, grow, form, even galaxies. Afterall, star formation is a key stage in galaxy evolutioin.

Eta C
2004-Jun-24, 04:01 PM
I do feel the need to tout my own university, since it wasn't included in ngc's list (and I turned down Colorado to come here). U of Illinois (at Urbana-Champaign) has a few people who study stellar evolution and/or formation. I suggest that you look at the department website, and you can investigate profs and research areas there. The addy is www.astro.uiuc.edu. If you think that you're interested in a prof's research, I 'd think that the best thing to do is e-mail them, but feel free to ask me any questions you have as well (or first ;) ).

And, while we're plugging UIUC, don't forget to add the benefit of a top notch Physics department (http://www.physics.uiuc.edu/) just down the street. 8)

P.S. I see Tony Leggett received a knighthood (http://www.fco.gov.uk/servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1007029391629&a=KArticle&aid=1 086625889862) to go along with last year's Nobel Prize. Congrats Sir Anthony!

Edited to fix link

Ricimer
2004-Jun-24, 05:00 PM
eta, apparently your link has undergone a phase transition.

Sometimes I still wish I'd managed to go to UIUC. The physics department here is basically all solid state/quantum all the tiime. While interesting, it doesn't float my boat.

And the astronomy department is...interesting. Basically being strangled by the now top notch quantum physics department, and internal politics.

Then agian, I'm up to my neck in various astronomy activities. TA, RA, Tutor, I actually make a living off of those.

Eta C
2004-Jun-24, 06:06 PM
Sorry about that. I think I've fixed it.

Tobin Dax
2004-Jun-24, 07:09 PM
I do feel the need to tout my own university, since it wasn't included in ngc's list (and I turned down Colorado to come here). U of Illinois (at Urbana-Champaign) has a few people who study stellar evolution and/or formation. I suggest that you look at the department website, and you can investigate profs and research areas there. The addy is www.astro.uiuc.edu. If you think that you're interested in a prof's research, I 'd think that the best thing to do is e-mail them, but feel free to ask me any questions you have as well (or first ;) ).

And, while we're plugging UIUC, don't forget to add the benefit of a top notch Physics department (http://www.physics.uiuc.edu/) just down the street. 8)

P.S. I see Tony Leggett received a knighthood (http://www.fco.gov.uk/servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1007029391629&a=KArticle&aid=1 086625889862) to go along with last year's Nobel Prize. Congrats Sir Anthony!

Edited to fix link

Yep, we have a great physics department. A number of astronomy faculty are also part of the physics faculty (one or two of which are studying what ricimer is interested in).

ngc3314
2004-Jun-25, 04:07 AM
Tobin: I was this close (--) to going there myself. I have the student ID and everything.

Then they hung my financial aid package out to dry and I ended up enrolling at UNL (after the deadlines, that was interesting!).

NGC, thanks for the list.

All right, whats the specific recommendation? I like how things change, grow, form, even galaxies. Afterall, star formation is a key stage in galaxy evolutioin.

Well, you dragged it out of me, so in the shameless self-promotion department, you might check out www.astr.ua.edu, noting that we even have folks who write books on galaxy evolution. "Focussed group". Yeah, that's the term - focussed...

Indeed, much of galaxy evolution is driven by changes in star formation. Although Alan Dressler has made the interesting point that it may be more straightforward to understand the history of S0 galaxies if we consider the history of how star formation has shut down. What's that line about the opposite of a great truth also being a great truth?

yodalige
2004-Jul-10, 12:10 AM
Just to let you know, I am new here (this is my first post). I am considering applying to UIUC but I have heard from one of my former professors that when he was going to grad school, the physics department at UIUC had a bad reputation of washing out most of their students after one or two years (he called it a "TA mill"). Now, this was in the 80's, so I have no idea if this is still true, and I would be applying to the astronomy department, not physics, so it very well may be a different story there. What I was wondering specifically was if anyone had any info (or knew where I could look to find it) on the percentage of entering grad students in the astronomy program that are actually granted a PhD.

Thanks in advance!

Tobin Dax
2004-Jul-10, 01:47 AM
Just to let you know, I am new here (this is my first post). I am considering applying to UIUC but I have heard from one of my former professors that when he was going to grad school, the physics department at UIUC had a bad reputation of washing out most of their students after one or two years (he called it a "TA mill"). Now, this was in the 80's, so I have no idea if this is still true, and I would be applying to the astronomy department, not physics, so it very well may be a different story there. What I was wondering specifically was if anyone had any info (or knew where I could look to find it) on the percentage of entering grad students in the astronomy program that are actually granted a PhD.

Thanks in advance!

Well, in physics this year, that's definitely true, since they admitted 70 grads ( :o ) last year. However, the astro dept is quite different. Have you looked at our website? (www.astro.uiuc.edu) Other than that, why don't you e-mail me, and I'll be glad to answer any questions you have. My addy is sbain at astro.uiuc.edu.