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Chunky
2011-Sep-28, 08:32 PM
I'm watching history channel. They are talking about ancient aliens and technology. One bit, mentioned an area who's. Omg I just slapped a spider off me.... Man that scared me....anyways..it mentioned.. a city where the walls were superheated and turned to glass. And bones that have a high radioactivity...what ever u call it..... Makes me wonder....


Could a comet "packed" with uranium or "the right stuff", hitting that right spot on the earth (the right spot, meaning.. the right mineral mixture which would create fusion.. idk if there are...) Create a nuclear explosion? Not a gigantic meteor, because if so, u could just as well equivale the mass that of an atom blast... Which is not what I want.. understand? I'll reiterate?

Middenrat
2011-Sep-29, 01:54 AM
You don't even need an impactor to get things fizzing - see this http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_nuclear_fission_reactor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_nuclear_fission_reactor) a reactor occurring within uranium deposits. It couldn't happen in the epoch you're interested in though, radioactive decay of the deposits leaves the neutron flux too low for the past 1.5bn years.

Ivan Viehoff
2011-Sep-29, 07:56 AM
a city where the walls were superheated and turned to glass.
Vitrified forts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitrified_fort
Mostly commonly found in Scotland, where about 50 are known, but there are several others around Europe. Given their distribution, unlikely to be anything to do with meteors, nuclear explosions, etc. Also we have techniques of dating the time of vitrification, so we can see that they didn't happen in a single event, so this seems to have been a construction method they used.

jfribrg
2011-Sep-29, 04:41 PM
You certainly won't get hydrogen fusion and I'm not sure which other light elements are capable of fusion under those circumstances. I also don't think that a Uranium asteroid would do anything because an uncontrolled fission reaction requires highly enriched uranium instead of the typical uranium found in rocks, so even a pure Uranium nucleous would not lead to an explosion and I can't think of any even remotely plausible serendipidous natural process that could leave an enriched rock in an asteroid and an equally enriched rock of Uranium on the Earth. Of course the two rocks would also need to be less than critical mass or they would have already exploded before the asteroid hit. For fusion to occur, you would need a bubble of heavy hydrogen (or some other fusable isotopope of a light element) next to the rock.

TrAI
2011-Sep-29, 05:35 PM
Hmmm... Erich von Däniken wrote books about such hypotheses, didn't he, but these writings are considered pseudoscience at best. It is a long time since I read any of these books, but I seem to recall something about vimana battles with nuclear weapons and that that he suggested that the destruction of cities by god in the bible due to the inhabitants being sinful was actually alien nuclear bombings, and that he claimed the sites were radioactive. But he isn't known for being very critical or scrupulous of/with evidence

I don't know, having listened to some Lovecraft audio books this week it sounds like some mix of his stories and mythology... Ruined or doomed cities were not an uncommon thing in those stories, and back in the time when the Elder things had settled down they had troubles with the revolt of the shoggoths and than there were battles with other races coming to earth, like the Cthulhu spawn. Though these things happened in far before humans came along(In fact, it is possible that humans and other Earth life is descended from the experiments of the Elder things). Human interactions with the creatures in the stories are limited and strike small areas, Though I suppose that when Nyarlathotep comes visiting, it would be rather more than this.

Swift
2011-Sep-29, 05:47 PM
Vitrified forts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitrified_fort
Mostly commonly found in Scotland, where about 50 are known, but there are several others around Europe. Given their distribution, unlikely to be anything to do with meteors, nuclear explosions, etc. Also we have techniques of dating the time of vitrification, so we can see that they didn't happen in a single event, so this seems to have been a construction method they used.
Very cool, I wasn't familiar with those.

Depending upon the minerals present, it actually might be relatively easy to get that sort of vitrification. I would image that building a big enough fire in the enclosure, particularly if you did something to drive air into the fire (think of something like a smithie's forge) and you could get it very hot in there - certainly hot enough to melt some of the minerals.

Why one would do that, I don't know. Maybe just because it looked pretty.

Swift
2011-Sep-29, 05:51 PM
Combining themes from two different current OTB threads... won't Atomic Asteroid be a great name for a rock band.

John Jaksich
2011-Sep-29, 05:57 PM
You certainly won't get hydrogen fusion and I'm not sure which other light elements are capable of fusion under those circumstances. I also don't think that a Uranium asteroid would do anything because an uncontrolled fission reaction requires highly enriched uranium instead of the typical uranium found in rocks, so even a pure Uranium nucleous would not lead to an explosion and I can't think of any even remotely plausible serendipidous natural process that could leave an enriched rock in an asteroid and an equally enriched rock of Uranium on the Earth. Of course the two rocks would also need to be less than critical mass or they would have already exploded before the asteroid hit. For fusion to occur, you would need a bubble of heavy hydrogen (or some other fusable isotopope of a light element) next to the rock.


I also tend to agree here ---but the possibility of chemical reactions other than than fission are more likely to happen. That would be contingent upon the initial conditions of the site where the asteroid strikes.

As for a comet---IMO the radiation (innate to the comet) would make it unstable to the point of it fragmenting the dirty snowball into what the core may be made up of.

JustAFriend
2011-Oct-01, 06:25 PM
When a good sized one can slam into the Earth and release many megatons of force
just by impact alone, a bit of uranium going critical really isn't going to make much difference...