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View Full Version : Solar System "Geology" Questions. (A Bunch!)



BigDon
2011-Oct-04, 05:52 PM
Does anybody know:

A) The longest vertical drop in the solar system?

B) Does any solid body have more H2O than we do?

C) From the asteroid belt inward, where would you find the oldest exposed ices? (That would be a liquid or a gas at standard pressure and tempuratures)

D) Only counting solid objects large enough to pull themselves round(ish), what is the overall dryest body in the solar system?

E) Does the Earth have the most sand?

F) Besides the Jupitur and Earth, do any other bodies radiate in the radio frequency? (I would *guess* most of the gas and ice giants do.)

G) Does equatorial Earth have the most stable day/night temperatures?

H) Does anybody know the light level at the surface of Venus at noon?

I) In any one location on Venus, are some days cloudier than others?

J)Does anybody have a clue as to conditions in the Jovian atmosphere where the gas pressure is equal to sea level Earth. (A balloon ride of you prefer. What would your gondola need to be proof against, once you were delivered through those gnarly radiation belts o' doom.)

I have to log out and go lay down now. I believe my neuro condition is about to enter an acute phase.

antoniseb
2011-Oct-04, 06:07 PM
Does anybody know:

B) Does any solid body have more H2O than we do?

C) From the asteroid belt inward, where would you find the oldest exposed ices? (That would be a liquid or a gas at standard pressure and tempuratures)

D) Only counting solid objects large enough to pull themselves round(ish), what is the overall dryest body in the solar system?

I) In any one location on Venus, are some days cloudier than others?
...

B> I imagine that Europa and Callisto both have more. Possibly Titan as well. The Earth's average water depth is maybe 3 miles. Europa has maybe a sixteenth our surface area, so it would need water to be about 70 miles deep to be equal, but we think it is hundreds of miles deep.

C> I'd guess outer asteroid belt, but only because such ices would sublime more slowly than in the inner Solar System.

D> I'd have to think that it would be Mercury, if by dry you mean has the least water as a total fraction of its mass. Venus might be a close second.

I> The images we see of Venus show non-homogeneous cloud cover. I'd have to guess that would lead to greater and lesser amounts of light.

BTW, the Venera Probes could probably tell you something about light level, but I'm too lazy to look it up today.

Jeff Root
2011-Oct-04, 06:44 PM
G> I'm pretty sure Venus has the the most stable day/night temperatures.
Today's weather: Cloudy and very, very, very, very hot. Tonight, continued
cloudiness and very, very, very hot to very, very, very, very hot. And of
course, the length of a day (and night) on Venus ...

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Swift
2011-Oct-04, 09:29 PM
F) Besides the Jupitur and Earth, do any other bodies radiate in the radio frequency? (I would *guess* most of the gas and ice giants do.)
The sun?


H) Does anybody know the light level at the surface of Venus at noon?
I don't have the number, but there were the Russian landers and they took photos on the surface, so I expect it is know or could be calculated from the characteristics of the cameras.


I have to log out and go lay down now. I believe my neuro condition is about to enter an acute phase.
Sorry BD, take care of yourself.

WayneFrancis
2011-Oct-05, 02:01 AM
Does anybody know:

A) The longest vertical drop in the solar system?


Hmmm not sure but I know Mar has features that dwarf those here on Earth. Less gravity = greater ability for those structures to form.



B) Does any solid body have more H2O than we do?


Europa and Ganymede are 2 that pop into mind. Europa we believe has much more liquid water then Earth does. I believe most of Ganymede's water is in the form of ice but the core could be hot enough for a liquid layer...might help explain the magnetic field it has.




C) From the asteroid belt inward, where would you find the oldest exposed ices? (That would be a liquid or a gas at standard pressure and tempuratures)


Craters at the poles on the moon and Mercury. Are you talking about water ice or any ice?



D) Only counting solid objects large enough to pull themselves round(ish), what is the overall dryest body in the solar system?


From my understanding we have not recorded any water from Io.



E) Does the Earth have the most sand?


Depends on what you call sand. Mars is the only contender I know of and it is one big desert. To get sand you need some type of erosion.



F) Besides the Jupitur and Earth, do any other bodies radiate in the radio frequency? (I would *guess* most of the gas and ice giants do.)


Yea Saturn and other planets radiate in the radio. It is due to their magnetic fields.



G) Does equatorial Earth have the most stable day/night temperatures?


In the solar system? I don't believe so. Venus, even with its long day cycle, doesn't have much variance in its surface temperature.



H) Does anybody know the light level at the surface of Venus at noon?


I've heard about 1% but that might be a bit generous. 90% of the light is reflected right off the bat.




I) In any one location on Venus, are some days cloudier than others?

Bit like asking if some days is Jupiter cloudier than others or like here on Earth are any days at the bottom of the ocean wetter then others. I'd have to say no to this one.



J)Does anybody have a clue as to conditions in the Jovian atmosphere where the gas pressure is equal to sea level Earth. (A balloon ride of you prefer. What would your gondola need to be proof against, once you were delivered through those gnarly radiation belts o' doom.)


Very high speed winds?



I have to log out and go lay down now. I believe my neuro condition is about to enter an acute phase.

Good night.

BigDon
2011-Oct-10, 06:22 AM
Thank you for the replies.

Still curious as to the long vertical drop in the solar system. I thought maybe on Iapetus which has scarps 15 km high, but somebody else said probably on Mercury.

geonuc
2011-Oct-10, 08:58 AM
Wikipedia suggests Verona Rupes on Miranda as the tallest cliff at 5-10 km, which is less than your Iapetus scarp, but this link (http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-steepest-cliff-in-the-solar-system.htm) says VR is 20 km high.

grapes
2011-Oct-10, 11:01 AM
20km, APOD: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110404.html

But, how did they determine 20km? And why straight down? Even cliffs on earth are seldom straight down. Although, wiki says Mount Thor is the greatest earth vertical, 1.25 km, average angle 105 degrees.

BigDon
2011-Oct-12, 04:27 PM
Thanks Geo, Grapes. As always you guys are great. Verona Rupes. Cool.

But at the other suggestion I have been looking a Mercury's new images and at its scarp system and I wouldn't count it out of the running yet!