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View Full Version : Why do they try to Smuggle through Airports ?



RAF_Blackace
2011-Oct-08, 07:23 AM
Working at Gatwick this week, I saw a flight from the Caribbean come in every day at the same time during the week. Whilst passengers were blissfully unaware and picking their bags up from the carousel, the UK Border Agency had 8 guys opening bags and letting a drugs dog sniff all round them on the other side of the wall where the carousel gets loaded. Spoke to the guy with the Dog, he said the dog had found £2,000,000 worth of cocaine during the course of that week alone, catching on average 5 to 7 people each day.

They target certain flights from certain destinations, each time the dog found a bag with drugs, the bag was opened to confirm the find before carefully being repacked and put on the carousel for the unsuspecting passenger to pick up. Where he is then pulled up and arrested.

The chances of these dogs missing anything is virtually nil, and every single bag gets sniffed by the dogs. At one stage they even had the dog sniffing every passenger to see if anyone had anything hidden internally. The dogs themselves are probably the best looked after and happiest dogs I have ever seen, so cute and always wanting to play.

And obviously they must be amongst the most valuable dogs in the country.

I was really impressed with the teams, doing a great job and the more people they catch the cleaner our streets.

With the chances of success so slim, just why do they still try to smuggle through airports ? I think it must be just simple stupidity.

novaderrik
2011-Oct-08, 07:42 AM
they know that most of what they try to get thru will be found- that's why they send most of the stuff in via other methods. there is a LOT of open ocean around an island nation..

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-08, 09:37 AM
They try because, with the exception of cinema pop-corn, there's really nothing else with a higher profit margin, and even if only a teeny tiny bit gets through it'll pay for the rest.
And trying in airports ties down resources there that would otherwise be used in some of the other places they move it through.

Moose
2011-Oct-08, 01:08 PM
with the exception of cinema pop-corn

... and printer ink.

swampyankee
2011-Oct-08, 02:02 PM
There is a lot of traffic through an airport, especially a major hub. There are also a lot of gullible people willing to say yes to "carry this in your luggage and I'll pay you a hundred euros," doubtless a few thinking "hmm...cheap <drug of choice>...maybe I can give some to my friends," and, of course, the odd idiot who thinks that s/he'll get through.

korjik
2011-Oct-08, 05:29 PM
... and printer ink.

And college textbooks.

slang
2011-Oct-09, 12:31 AM
With the chances of success so slim, just why do they still try to smuggle through airports ? I think it must be just simple stupidity.

The answer that seems obvious to me is that enough must get through to continue doing it. But that's from the viewpoint of the person or group sending the smugglers. Why do people let themselves be used to run the risk of being caught? Some people are easily persuaded, for all kinds of purposes, including breaking of the law.

Fazor
2011-Oct-09, 01:46 AM
You knew this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF_MEE51Yrw) would have to come up, didn't you?

BigDon
2011-Oct-10, 03:02 AM
What on Earth makes you folks believe half these people have any choice?

You guys do know who you're dealing with right?

The same people who hung a woman from an overpass just south of the US border and eviscerated her in front of God and public for talking smack about them on face book? Last month? Who are still at large even though they ain't hidin?

Yeah, those guys. They tell you're doing it, you're doing it.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-10, 03:19 AM
When asking "Why do they try?", the "they" aren't the mules, it's their masters.
And it's because the little bit that does get through pays for the rest.

swampyankee
2011-Oct-10, 08:38 PM
Well, as BigDon has noted, some of these people can be very persuasive, which is made even worse by the fact that in some of these countries the law enforcement community is deeply corrupt.

Cougar
2011-Oct-10, 09:40 PM
Whilst passengers were blissfully unaware and picking their bags up from the carousel, the UK Border Agency had 8 guys opening bags and letting a drugs dog sniff all round them on the other side of the wall where the carousel gets loaded.

In the U.S., through some rather convoluted reasoning, the Supreme Court has deemed that a sniff by a drug dog is not considered a search. Our 4th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is very picky about random, unwarranted, or unreasonable searches. But a "certified" drug sniffing dog can sniff around where you do not have an expectation of privacy, like airports, bus stations, etc. And if the dog gives its trained indication that contraband is present, that provides probable cause that a crime is occurring, and justifies a throrough search by the human officers.

HOWEVER, this UC Davis study (http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/publish/news/research/4968), published in the January 2011 issue of the journal Animal Cognition, found that detection-dog/handler teams erroneously “alerted,” or identified a scent, when there was no scent present more than 200 times — particularly when the handler believed that there was scent present! The handlers often cue the dog, either intentionally or unintentionally.

Another problem in the U.S. is that there is no national standard for certifying such dogs.

But you're right - the dogs are quite good at detecting certain odors. In fact, they're too good. Much U.S. currency has tiny residual amounts of cocaine on it. A completely innocent traveler may thus be targeted as a drug smuggler. That's another problem.

DukePaul
2011-Oct-10, 10:03 PM
Why on earth do you think that the "Governments" would want to end drug smuggling? Since the creation of forfeiture laws, the enforcement departments thrive on the confiscated money and properties. Why would the politicians and drug lords want drugs to be legal when there is money to be made if it is not legal and at the same time politicians can enact more laws to gain more control over the masses. I may be cynical to say that the best friends of the drug cartels are the most vocal anti-drug supporters.

pzkpfw
2011-Oct-11, 12:30 AM
(previous post)

That's rather too political for BAUT and conspiracy for this part of the forum (nor is it a CT that suits our CT section). No more, please.

Inclusa
2011-Oct-11, 01:21 AM
Ok, someone may be sarcastic enough to talk the same thing about physicians and pharmaceuticals; often enough, it is not their faults, either.

Jim
2011-Oct-11, 01:35 AM
Ok, someone may be sarcastic enough to talk the same thing about physicians and pharmaceuticals...

No, they won't, because that's the conspiracy angle pzkpfw just warned them to avoid.

ggremlin
2011-Oct-11, 05:07 AM
Simply, because it works and it has lowest transportation cost overhead. You don't have to build or buy your your vehicles, hire experienced people to do the smuggling. If every delivery was intercepted, they would stop using airlines and try other methods.

Ivan Viehoff
2011-Oct-11, 09:46 AM
The chances of these dogs missing anything is virtually nil, and every single bag gets sniffed by the dogs.

And obviously they must be amongst the most valuable dogs in the country.
These dogs can sniff drugs inside tin cans, can they? I recall a prominent case of a sportsman carrying some drugs in tin cans. He was caught, but I don't know whether it was sniffer dogs that identified them.

I understand sniffer dogs have been assassinated by criminals in some places.

RAF_Blackace
2011-Oct-11, 07:57 PM
I must admit what does confuse the dogs and annoys me at the Airports, is the putrid scent of marijuana on some passengers. I am amazed at how many passengers just walking through the airport stink of it. It is obvious to everyone what they have been doing. This distracts the dogs but these people very often do not get searched (some who absolutely stink of it do) because it is not the drug they are after. If you are smoking dope at an airport, 2 questions, how did you get it there, and where are you taking it ?

Fazor
2011-Oct-11, 09:09 PM
I must admit what does confuse the dogs and annoys me at the Airports, is the putrid scent of marijuana on some passengers. I am amazed at how many passengers just walking through the airport stink of it. It is obvious to everyone what they have been doing. This distracts the dogs but these people very often do not get searched (some who absolutely stink of it do) because it is not the drug they are after. If you are smoking dope at an airport, 2 questions, how did you get it there, and where are you taking it ?

I have people come into the office all the time that stink of either pot or alcohol (occasionally both.) It's funny because they all act like I did when I was 19 and drinking -- like no one else can tell what they've been up to. It's easy to think that because you don't notice your smell, that no one else does. In reality; I've had people that smell so strongly of it that I can smell them as soon as they open the door, which is two rooms and about 40 ft away from my desk.

What makes it really bad is that I sell insurance -- most typically, auto insurance. So these people are driving high/drunk to go pay their auto insurance premium. Oh well, at least they have insurance.

BigDon
2011-Oct-12, 01:04 PM
Working at Gatwick this week, I saw a flight from the Caribbean come in every day at the same time during the week. Whilst passengers were blissfully unaware and picking their bags up from the carousel, the UK Border Agency had 8 guys opening bags and letting a drugs dog sniff all round them on the other side of the wall where the carousel gets loaded. Spoke to the guy with the Dog, he said the dog had found £2,000,000 worth of cocaine during the course of that week alone, catching on average 5 to 7 people each day.

They target certain flights from certain destinations, each time the dog found a bag with drugs, the bag was opened to confirm the find before carefully being repacked and put on the carousel for the unsuspecting passenger to pick up. Where he is then pulled up and arrested.

The chances of these dogs missing anything is virtually nil, and every single bag gets sniffed by the dogs. At one stage they even had the dog sniffing every passenger to see if anyone had anything hidden internally. The dogs themselves are probably the best looked after and happiest dogs I have ever seen, so cute and always wanting to play.

And obviously they must be amongst the most valuable dogs in the country.

I was really impressed with the teams, doing a great job and the more people they catch the cleaner our streets.

With the chances of success so slim, just why do they still try to smuggle through airports ? I think it must be just simple stupidity.

Sorry for the big ol' quote but I think this needs saying.

Do you know how to tell if your countries drug inforcement agency is effective?

Find out how expensive street level powdered cocaine is selling for. 'Cause if cut coke is selling for the equivalent of $100 dollars a gram, (72 euros and change) your only nailing approximately 1 in 10 shipments, going by the California model.

So woo hoo, seven million a week is a loss leader. e.i. it makes the authorities believe they are effective and so they don't look for the real spigot.

BigDon
2011-Oct-12, 01:10 PM
The price of a gram of cocaine in London is 30 to 60 pounds

BigDon
2011-Oct-12, 01:16 PM
So, to answer the OP.

It's a diversion.

RAF_Blackace
2011-Oct-12, 04:58 PM
BigDon.

As previously stated, most contraband comes into the UK via our coastline, we may be a small Island but we have a massive coastline. In fact the second knottiest coastline in the world after Norway. I know shipping is the main method of getting drugs into the UK, which is why I was wondering why they still bother trying to get it in through airports.

There is very little change of getting anything in through airports, with HBS screening and Dogs and Customs most shipments get caught.

So why even try, why a diversion, what is the point if your successful with the ships ?

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-12, 05:05 PM
Nasty version:
Give the politicians something to hold up to show how successful they are at controlling drugs so they won't bother you as much on the coast.

BigDon
2011-Oct-12, 05:34 PM
Aren't you a former military pilot?

A diversion holds down men, money and material that could be used elsewhere.

But also, since we aren't children, we both know that not all the airport busts are sacrificial lambs thrown up to be imprisoned for life by the cartels but twentysomethings who operate on the premise of "If I can't figure out how they can catch me nobody can!" They have to be stopped too.

Why one time, when I was in the Navy, we were in Subic Bay, Phillipines and those of us that wante to sleep in our own racks that night were wanting to board the carrier in a big long queue and some knucklehead tried to "smuggle" an entire seabag full of loose greenbud. It was smelled so strongly even sailors who didn't know him were telling him to pull his head out and get the hell out of line.

No, he had a plan!

You know what his "plan" was?

His master plan was to put a padlock on the seabag and then tell the quarterdeck watch that he didn't have the key!

The quarterdeck watch was absolutely beautiful.

"Whoa! Open that seabag right now sailor!"

"I don't have the key"

"That's okay, I do!"

Watch pulls out folding knife and cuts seabag open.

Trying to smuggle 60 pounds of high end weed onto a military vessal will get you 12 years in a Marine Corp run red-line prison. The US has banned most, if not all, red-line prisons now. Low long term survival rate, (eight years on average), high stress induced mental illness rate.

Red line prisons get their name from the red lines painted on the floor every ten feet. The prisoner WILL come to attention and loudly ask permission to cross one of these red lines each and every time or he will be punished.