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snowcelt
2011-Oct-25, 02:29 AM
Why is it that remote controls have the "eye" at the end of the controller when the natural angle one points is 15 degrees to the left or the right? With all the new tech at hand (no pun intended), why not have the sensor skewed to that natural hand angle for ease of use.

Noclevername
2011-Oct-25, 05:59 AM
Probably handedness and money. Either make two types of controllers for lefties and righties, or add transmitters on each side; either way means more expensive to manufacture.

Middenrat
2011-Oct-25, 06:29 AM
It's not the L/R angle that irks me on remotes, it's the downward rotation I need to impart whilst keying on the top of the unit. Tendons don't seem to naturally pull that way.
I suppose the form of something truly ergonomic would scare the horses.

Hal37214
2011-Oct-25, 12:26 PM
I'm so old I can remember when I had to get up off the sofa to change the TV channel. Talk about an ergonomic nightmare!

NEOWatcher
2011-Oct-25, 01:32 PM
I'm so old I can remember when I had to get up off the sofa to change the TV channel. Talk about an ergonomic nightmare!
Don't forget about adjusting the antenna and fine tuning the station along with that channel change. And; then there's the occasional horizontal or vertical hold adjustment that goes along with that.

But; with only 3 VHF channels, that wasn't an issue. It did become a pain when we got a few UHF channels.

Strange
2011-Oct-25, 01:33 PM
For some reason, my remote seems to work better when I reflect it off the wall above/behind me.

BigDon
2011-Oct-25, 02:13 PM
I'm so old I can remember when I had to get up off the sofa to change the TV channel. Talk about an ergonomic nightmare!

Actually, like myself, you were probably your Dad's remote. :)

Hal37214
2011-Oct-25, 03:31 PM
Actually, like myself, you were probably your Dad's remote. :)

Oh, yeah. And I never perfected the art of blocking the screen so I could quickly flip past things I didn't want to watch.

"Hey! Turn that back!!"

Chuck
2011-Oct-25, 04:14 PM
The first remote I ever used was at the bowling alley where I worked in the 1970's. It didn't need batteries because it worked by sound, making a clicking noise. Unfortunately, putting quarters into the cash register had the same effect. Not popular during Monday Night Football. Other sized coins had no effect.

Jim
2011-Oct-25, 04:29 PM
When I saw the title of this thread - "egonomics" - I was certain it was a mispelling of "ergonomics." Then I saw it was about TV remotes.

Egonomics fits.

NEOWatcher
2011-Oct-25, 04:56 PM
The first remote I ever used was at the bowling alley where I worked in the 1970's. It didn't need batteries because it worked by sound, making a clicking noise. Unfortunately, putting quarters into the cash register had the same effect. Not popular during Monday Night Football. Other sized coins had no effect.
Hah; that reminds me of a similar one. You know how people tend to stop talking and gawk when someone drops a beer bottle. It's really noticable when the glass breaking sound turns off the TV.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-25, 05:16 PM
When I saw the title of this thread - "egonomics" - I was certain it was a mispelling of "ergonomics." Then I saw it was about TV remotes.

Egonomics fits.
I was certain it was about corporate greed. :)

DonM435
2011-Oct-27, 01:07 AM
My grandmother got a remote-controlled tv set, a "Zenith Space-Command" in 1962 or 1963, and everybody was fascinated by it. The remote unit was rather big by todays standards, and had big, movable keys that made an audible thunk when you pushed them. You could change the channel, mute the sound or turn the set off although the set stayed warm until you truly switched if off on the main unit.

It operated by sonic waves. I know, because once I was watching a tense moment in a ballgame and nervously shaking a big keychain, and some frequency in the jangle of keys caused the set to change channels! We experimented, and found that certain chords on a nearby piano could do the same! My spoilsport uncle told us to cut it out, lest we break grandma's set for good.

Remote controlled sets didn't become commonplace for a few years, though.


And yes, back home, I served as my Mom's remote. I'd stand there, changing the channels (there were only maybe five in those days), until she found something she liked.


Edit: I remember that on the early tv sets, the analogue channel dial knob would actually rotate when you effected a remote change, as if the Invisible Man were handling the task.

Muting the sound during a commercial was supposed to be a big advantage, but nobody bothered to do it. Of course, the commercials were only 30 seconds total at worst in those days.

TrAI
2011-Oct-27, 09:48 AM
Why is it that remote controls have the "eye" at the end of the controller when the natural angle one points is 15 degrees to the left or the right? With all the new tech at hand (no pun intended), why not have the sensor skewed to that natural hand angle for ease of use.

Modern remote controls generally use one or more infrared light emitting diodes to send signals to a TV set. A remote control may be used by left or right handed people, it may be used by adults or children, standing, sitting or laying on the floor, the TV may stand on a table or be mounted near the roof, or the remote may be used while just laying on a table, so there is any number of "correct" angles, but the mounting in line with the remote body will in most cases put the receiver on the TV within the angle of emission of the IR LED on the remote when it is pointed in the general direction of the TV, and in many cases even reflected light is enough.

Of course, you may have a remote with a poorly chosen LED or it may glow too dimly, or the receiver on your TV may be poor, and so have to be more accurate with your pointing, but some instances of defective devices or poor choices on the side of the manufacturers is hardly enough to conclude the design in general is faulty.

NEOWatcher
2011-Oct-27, 12:36 PM
The early infrared remotes had problems too.
I knew someone that had to move thier set because it acted like an alarm clock.

The rising sun would shine just right to hit the sensor and turn on the tv.

peteshimmon
2011-Oct-27, 09:19 PM
Years ago my late father passed the new
video recorder and its remote over to my
teenaged brother and sat back while he
sorted it all out.

I've dreamed of pistol grip remotes with
mute for background "music", teletext
controls that allow flash through all
pages, keywords for teletext that flash
up like your hometown on the news page.

But advertisers dont want viewers having
too much control do they?

DonM435
2011-Nov-12, 06:39 AM
It'd be nice if all that textual material could be kept offscreen and only displayed when you wanted (puish a button) to see it. Or, at least put it in that blank area above or below the letterboxed screen.

But then again, most people would choose to never see it, and the advertisers won't go along with that.