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View Full Version : Dog versus Cat: The cat wins!



Buttercup
2011-Oct-29, 07:42 PM
Ten minutes ago, while taking my last "coffee break" (I work in my home), I heard a sudden commotion behind me.

Turned around.

There's a white poodle-looking mutt barking and yapping while running from the neighbor's yard. See another animal giving chase. Figure it's 2 dogs fighting...

...no, the other is a beautiful young white-and-gray tomcat which prowls this area.

The dog slows to look over its shoulder. The cat stands staring like "...and STAY OUT!" Dog growl/yaps again and resumes a full harried run. :lol:

The cat stands there quietly. Then looks over at me (I give him a "Feline Power!" salute). Then saunters back into the neighbor's yard.

Moose
2011-Oct-29, 08:00 PM
99% of the time, bet on the cat.

Most of the remaining 1% wind up being mutually-assured destruction. I've got a story, but it doesn't end well. I'll spare you guys.

Swift
2011-Oct-29, 09:07 PM
I agree with Moose, most of the time a single cat versus a single dog, cat will win or at least hold their own. Retractable claws and speed are hard to beat.

Buttercup
2011-Oct-29, 09:20 PM
Yep. :)

What really tickled me was how rattled/scared the dog was, as compared to the cat's calmly commanding posture.

grapes
2011-Oct-29, 09:20 PM
Now is probably not the time to debate whether poodles are dogs, right?

jlhredshift
2011-Oct-29, 10:43 PM
I've had cats all my life. When I was seven or eight and spending the weekend at grandma's, they had their fully franged male cat tied on a leash, (I found that practice to be really and utterly wrong), and he was sitting on the provided perch atop the railing, when a medium sized dog decided to encroach upon the cat's territory. When the dog got close enough, the cat lept onto the dogs back, dug all four claws in, and braced its back, neck, and shoulder muscles in the collar area, seemingly anticipating the rope going taught when the dog took off, which it did. One loud yelp later the cat was flying up into the air following the arc of the rope and then landed on all four starring at the dog defiantly. The next time I saw the dog he crossed over to the other side of the street, to pass Grandma's house, whether the cat was there or not.

swampyankee
2011-Oct-29, 11:28 PM
My parents' last dog was a 20 pound terrier mix. When my brother was walking him, off-leash, the dog found the neighbor's cat (probably about 10 lb) in the field, and gave chase. When the dog was about 5 feet behind the cat, the cat seemed to decide it couldn't make it to the trees and started to turn around to fight. The dog grabbed it in the middle of the back before the cat finished turning around. The cat squirmed away, and found out it could run fast enough to reach the trees. It probably helped that the dog had a damaged ACL and couldn't run for more than about 50 feet. In this area, cats are fairly frequently eaten by coyotes, which are very closely related to domestic dogs (as in they can interbreed and produce fertile offspring). I also have spoken to people who have seen dogs ambush and kill cats.

This is one reason why I think it's horrible to declaw cats. Even if they're not let outside, they may get outside. Without their claws, they can't escape from dogs by climbing and can't even defend themselves.

Buttercup
2011-Oct-30, 01:27 AM
When the dog got close enough, the cat lept onto the dogs back, dug all four claws in, and braced its back, neck, and shoulder muscles in the collar area, seemingly anticipating the rope going taught when the dog took off, which it did. One loud yelp later the cat was flying up into the air following the arc of the rope and then landed on all four starring at the dog defiantly.

Lol!! :clap:


The next time I saw the dog he crossed over to the other side of the street, to pass Grandma's house, whether the cat was there or not.

Many a dog has been turned into a chicken by a cat.

ABR.
2011-Oct-30, 01:54 AM
A little off topic, but since someone already mentioned coyotes...

My wife and I drove through the Badlands of South Dakota once. Although it was many years ago now, I still remember vividly the scene as we watched a frightened coyote chased for many hundreds of yards, around and over small hillocks...by a pronghorn. Luckily for the coyote, the pronghorn let it go.

swampyankee
2011-Oct-30, 02:23 AM
A little off topic, but since someone already mentioned coyotes...

My wife and I drove through the Badlands of South Dakota once. Although it was many years ago now, I still remember vividly the scene as we watched a frightened coyote chased for many hundreds of yards, around and over small hillocks...by a pronghorn. Luckily for the coyote, the pronghorn let it go.

Most predators try to minimize their risk of injury, which is why almost all mammalian predators will scavenge: if it's already dead, it can't hurt them. It's also why guardian sheep dogs, like komondors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Komondor) or Bedlingtons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bedlington_Terrier), could keep off wolves.

Incidentally, poodles are real dogs. A standard poodle is about the same size and build as a German shepherd.

Swift
2011-Oct-30, 02:25 AM
The next time I saw the dog he crossed over to the other side of the street, to pass Grandma's house, whether the cat was there or not.
When I was a kid there was a big orange tabby named Cinnamon who used to like to sit on the sidewalk by his house. He was very nice to people, but he hated dogs. I actually saw dogs cross to the other side of the street to avoid him.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-30, 02:29 AM
I agree with Moose, most of the time a single cat versus a single dog, cat will win or at least hold their own. Retractable claws and speed are hard to beat.
That's right up until the dog gets over the surprise of that small furry thing being a small furry killing thing and learns how to kill them.
Some of the larger dogs do learn and will win any time after that.


Now is probably not the time to debate whether poodles are dogs, right?
They're originally bred to be hunting dogs, that many people don't seem to understand the working part of that breed doesn't make them any less a hunting breed.
Incidentally, the poodle cut, ridiculous though it looks, was developed for optimizing them for their hunting role.

In Denmark it recently made minor news when a priest shot a couple of poodles for killing several of her cats.

Tog
2011-Oct-30, 03:05 AM
This is one of the more mild play sessions at the house. At least, before we got the Little Dumb Dog. Now, they gang up on the cat and it's not as fun for him. These two really are playing, as you can see from the end of the clip.

Why I can't sleep (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v205/Epim/Stuff%20that%20lives%20with%20me/?action=view&current=IMG_0004.mp4).

Both are older now and the cat is a lot bigger.

TJMac
2011-Oct-30, 03:30 PM
Cats are pointy on five ends, as Hobbes pointed out once. It's been my experience, a wary full size cat, maybe with some street smarts, usually does well against his canine nemesis. Young, elderly, or just not wary cats, tend to lose.

When kitty wins, its not too bad usually. When kitty loses, its tends to be fatal.

We used to keep quite a few cats when I was still on the farm. One of my best cat memories was of when we were loading wheat straw bales. (they were kind of used as filler in hard winter, when the cattle had nothing else to eat. They got one truckload of alfalfa, and one later of wheat-straw.) The wheat had a bit of grain in it, so was full of mice. The cats had a hay day (HAHA) laying in wait for the mice when we moved the bales.

We got to the end of one stack, and there is a really large rat hiding away. (I want to say, it was cat sized, but that is likely bad memory)
An old scarred up tomcat went after it. They shot under the truck, and much growling and snarling ensued. A few seconds later, the rat exited one side, the cat exited the other side, and both went off to their respective corners.

And btw, yes, a standard poodle is actually quite an impressive dog. Very smart, trainable for quite a few tasks, used quite a bit as a gun dog/retriever. Some European police and militaries use them as security type animals, and I think they can be used as herders as well.
I am not fond of little dogs in general, so I am biased against the miniature ones. :whistle:

TJ

tlbs101
2011-Oct-30, 07:15 PM
Of the 5 cats and 4 small dogs in our rural New Mexico home, the alpha-male is a cat and the beta-male is also a cat. These two are constantly fighting for alpha position and they don't take any crap from the dogs. AND... both are declawed and neutered.

When we "Brady Bunched' our pets a year ago, both cats were used to being sole-alpha in their respective homes.

Buttercup
2011-Oct-31, 02:28 AM
Of the 5 cats and 4 small dogs in our rural New Mexico home, the alpha-male is a cat and the beta-male is also a cat. These two are constantly fighting for alpha position and they don't take any crap from the dogs. AND... both are declawed and neutered.

Further proof that a cat is always a cat...and nobody's fool. They are never entirely "ours"; always true to themselves.

tnjrp
2011-Oct-31, 08:01 AM
That's right up until the dog gets over the surprise of that small furry thing being a small furry killing thing and learns how to kill them.
Some of the larger dogs do learn and will win any time after thatYes. Especially if the cat is st00pid enough yet not fast enough to run away instead of standing its ground. A cat doesn't fight back nearly as well after its spine has been crushed at the waist. My neighbour's Finnish Hound used to have a bad rep because it killed so many cats and he almost always specifically did it by biting them in the back first.

Indeed it's better that - when it comes down to an actual fight - the cat wins, provided it doesn't hurt the dog badly in the process.

I'm very glad my dogs don't try to go after cats, or that there aren't any big nasty cats that might try to attack them around. We almost had run-in with a Norwegian forest cat back when we lived in Kuopio but luckily the only thing the beast apparently was afraid of - its owner - showed up and it was forced to retreat. I've very rarely heard a cat growl the way that one did.

parallaxicality
2011-Oct-31, 01:35 PM
I think a lot of things have to be taken into account. Cats have better weapons and better reflexes, and have the advantage of being naturally solitary; dogs are evolved to hunt and kill in packs, but lose that advantage once domesticated. But let's not forget; dogs are, by and large, much bigger than cats, and a good sized dog could snap a cat in half if it so chose. Given similar size, such as a poodle or a terrier, I wouldn't put my money on the dog, but a large dog, like a wolfhound, would make short work of a cat. It also depends on the nature of the dog. A great dane, despite being about eight times the size of an average cat, would flee at the first snarl, because that's what great danes do. A particularly aggressive dog, like a pit bull or a rottweiler, however, would strip all nine lives from a cat faster than it could blink.

Moose
2011-Oct-31, 03:06 PM
A particularly aggressive dog, like a pit bull or a rottweiler, however, would strip all nine lives from a cat faster than it could blink.

Right. Since we went there, it's story time. An old college buddy of mine told me this about his tom cat, and I'm going to relay it more or less the way he told it to me.

His neighbor was one of those dog owners. Owned a purebred rottweiler which he trained to be aggressive. He'd keep it on a chain in the front yard to bother passers-by. My friend's cat, (from the sounds of it, a Tom's Tom), would have none of it, and would trail its tail through that front yard to put the dog in its place. The dog would invariably charge the cat, who would be sitting just out of range to watch the dog rebound violently when it hit the end.

One evening, the dog owner lengthened the chain...

My friend gets a call the next morning which started (caps included): "YOUR CAT KILLED MY DOG!!!" Sure enough, the dog was a wreck and thoroughly dead. Eyes gone, belly ripped open, etc.

The Tom was nowhere to be found.

It returned a few days later. Tail missing, an ear missing, a broken leg, and some pretty serious gashes on its body. And one smug look on its face. "He may have gotten me, but I got him first."

Unfortunately, the damage was too bad; the cat had to be put down. The dog owner sued in small claims court for the price of the dog (a few hundred bucks, forget exactly), but the judge dismissed the suit because the dog owner provoked the fight by deliberately lengthening the chain.

And that's what I mean about mutually assured destruction. Yes, an atypically powerful dog can take a typical cat, but factors generally being equal, the cat will win in just about every scenario.

Buttercup
2011-Oct-31, 05:18 PM
My friend gets a call the next morning which started (caps included): "YOUR CAT KILLED MY DOG!!!" Sure enough, the dog was a wreck and thoroughly dead. Eyes gone, belly ripped open, etc.

The Tom was nowhere to be found.

It returned a few days later. Tail missing, an ear missing, a broken leg, and some pretty serious gashes on its body. And one smug look on its face. "He may have gotten me, but I got him first."

Unfortunately, the damage was too bad; the cat had to be put down.

Wow. A tragic but interesting story.

I do like dogs, but prefer cats. And I hate people who deliberately turn their dogs mean.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-31, 05:25 PM
It mainly depends on whether the dog knows that the place to attack is a bite to the neck or back, from behind, and that a cat on its back isn't in a submission pose but in a fully deployed fighting stance.

Given similar size, such as a poodle or a terrier, I wouldn't put my money on the dog, but a large dog, like a wolfhound, would make short work of a cat.
Again with the slander of poodles. :)
You're thinking toy or mini poodles, not standard poodles which start at 15 inches, quite a bit more than most cat breeds. Except in France where standard poodles start at 18 in and it's therefore "rather more than".

HenrikOlsen
2011-Oct-31, 05:26 PM
Right. Since we went there, it's story time.
I knew which story you'd hinted at earlier because you told it before, so I've just been waiting for it.

swampyankee
2011-Oct-31, 06:24 PM
Slandering terriers, too. Remember, many of the breeds of terriers were bred to hunt and kill the rats that were too big for the cats to deal with. ;)

I'm sure that we can come up with dueling anecdotes about cats that have killed dogs and vice versa all day, but it's pointless: most cats will run away from a dog, and most dogs will not press home an attack on a cat that's been cornered. They're evolutionary past is as predators, and predators minimize their risk of being injured by prey. Some dogs -- usually medium sized ones (like beagles) -- do learn how to kill cats, and can do so repeatedly. Most domestic dogs don't. Of course, coyotes (Canis latrans), which average about 30 pounds, do routinely hunt and kill domestic cats for food. Indeed, many cat owners in this region are keeping their cats in at night for just this reason: the do not want to find the remnants of Tabby in the back yard.

parallaxicality
2011-Oct-31, 06:48 PM
Sue me. I hate terriers. Nasty little yipping things. And yes I was thinking of toy poodles. My great aunt, as it happens, owned a succession of standard poodles.

Great story about the cat vs the rottie though. I had a similar cat, or, nominally at least, my brother did. He was essentially part feral, and would range around his territory for weeks on end, and sometimes come back with another family's name on his collar. He was the kind of cat who could down a bird in mid-flight with one swipe of his paw. Anyway, #one day he returned with a massive swelling in his tail. The vet shaved the area and revealed a very distinctive bite mark; this cat had been attacked by a coyote and, somehow, managed to escape. To this day the particulars of that encounter are unknown, but they must have involved the coyote getting more that it figured it could chew. But such things are not forever. One day, he disappeared and never came back. Reports were that coyotes were in the area, and we concluded he had had one fight too many.

Moose
2011-Oct-31, 07:17 PM
I knew which story you'd hinted at earlier because you told it before, so I've just been waiting for it.

I did? *blinks* Heh, I suppose I must have.

Moose
2011-Oct-31, 07:21 PM
Slandering terriers, too. Remember, many of the breeds of terriers were bred to hunt and kill the rats that were too big for the cats to deal with. ;)

What, baby kangaroos?

swampyankee
2011-Oct-31, 08:08 PM
What, baby kangaroos?

No. Their mothers ;)

Also, see http://www.terrierman.com/dogsrats.htm

flogger11
2011-Nov-01, 01:25 AM
For anybody here that thinks a cat can take a dog down they are sadly mistaken. I have witnessed what happens first hand and it is not pretty. For the cat. Throw a cat into my fenced in back yard and watch what happens... and it wouldnt matter if one or two of my girls were present, the grisly results would be the same.

Kaptain K
2011-Nov-07, 02:46 AM
For anybody here that thinks a cat can take a dog down they are sadly mistaken. I have witnessed what happens first hand and it is not pretty. For the cat. Throw a cat into my fenced in back yard and watch what happens... and it wouldnt matter if one or two of my girls were present, the grisly results would be the same.

Throw a dog (any dog) in with any cat but a housecat, and the results would be very diferent. Even a 40 lb bobcat could shred any dog!

tnjrp
2011-Nov-07, 05:25 AM
I don't doubt a cat can easily take on a dog twice its size in a one-on-one. So a lynx or puma is going to be a hard one to beat for any dog. Unfortunately for most cats that live around humans and dogs, they are quite often much smaller than half the size of the attacking dog. OTOH unfortunately for bigger cats, dogs don't often come in singles (cf: a lion vs. a pack of cape hunting dogs).

Oh and kids, don't try any of the things mentioned in the above post at home. Reading anecdotes about dog-cat-fights = OK (sorta anyway), staging them = very bad, mmm'kay?

Hornblower
2011-Nov-07, 03:56 PM
Right. Since we went there, it's story time. An old college buddy of mine told me this about his tom cat, and I'm going to relay it more or less the way he told it to me.

His neighbor was one of those dog owners. Owned a purebred rottweiler which he trained to be aggressive. He'd keep it on a chain in the front yard to bother passers-by. My friend's cat, (from the sounds of it, a Tom's Tom), would have none of it, and would trail its tail through that front yard to put the dog in its place. The dog would invariably charge the cat, who would be sitting just out of range to watch the dog rebound violently when it hit the end.

One evening, the dog owner lengthened the chain...

My friend gets a call the next morning which started (caps included): "YOUR CAT KILLED MY DOG!!!" Sure enough, the dog was a wreck and thoroughly dead. Eyes gone, belly ripped open, etc.

The Tom was nowhere to be found.

It returned a few days later. Tail missing, an ear missing, a broken leg, and some pretty serious gashes on its body. And one smug look on its face. "He may have gotten me, but I got him first."

Unfortunately, the damage was too bad; the cat had to be put down. The dog owner sued in small claims court for the price of the dog (a few hundred bucks, forget exactly), but the judge dismissed the suit because the dog owner provoked the fight by deliberately lengthening the chain.

And that's what I mean about mutually assured destruction. Yes, an atypically powerful dog can take a typical cat, but factors generally being equal, the cat will win in just about every scenario.My educated guess is that the cat delivered a lucky killing bite, perhaps with the dog encumbered by the chain.

In any case I have a seething contempt for the owner of the dog for doing that sort of baiting. It is a shame that the dog did not have the sense to turn on him. It appears that he abusively exploited a dog's instinctive tendency to submit to a human substitute for an alpha canine.

Nicolas
2011-Nov-09, 01:25 PM
Standard poodles are large dogs. And they can be very agressive (though well trained, they should also be calm and safe dogs). Rottweilers can be made agressive (they are after all large muscular dogs) but a good one tends to be a hug honey. Pitbulls can also be very gentle dogs.

Poodles have a strange rep, about 180 from the dog they really are. I'd rather run into a loose rottweiler than a loose poodle in the street. Chances are the rottweiler is a good-natured balanced dog with a happy face and "oh hi, please hug me" eyes.

Our neighbour's dog (quite large shepherd) once accidentally ran into one of our cats. Who had just given birth a few days earlier. Luckily it was a smart dog: he backed up.

Cougar
2011-Nov-09, 02:28 PM
Pitbulls can also be very gentle dogs.

This could spawn a thread of its own. Forget the cats - pit bulls seem to go after humans a lot. They're outlawed in some places.

Noclevername
2011-Nov-09, 02:44 PM
A few years back my neighbor's 2 rottweilers attacked my sister's dog Quincy while my mother was out walking with him, and with my then-six month-old nephew in a stroller. Quincy spent months at the vet's. Later, the rottweilers attacked another dog walking by, and were put down. The owner-- well, if I described my neighbor in frank terms I'd be banned for language, so let's just say I don't blame the dogs for what happened.

Trebuchet
2011-Nov-09, 03:11 PM
This could spawn a thread of its own. Forget the cats - pit bulls seem to go after humans a lot. They're outlawed in some places.

In most of those cases, it might be possible to rehabilitate the dog. The owners, probably not. They're the ones who should be locked up forever.

Hornblower
2011-Nov-09, 05:28 PM
My guess is that many of the bad owners cited here are variations on the bully theme. A typical bully has unconquered inferiority-complex demons and builds himself up by tormenting others. Perhaps these variants use maltrained dogs to do the dirty work to save themselves the trouble of doing it themselves.

swampyankee
2011-Nov-09, 11:12 PM
I like dogs; I don't dislike cats (I think cats can be cute, furry, and lovable; I just think that far too many cat owners are hideously irresponsible). I do not let my dog chase cats -- the cats around here are either "outside" cats (see parenthetic comment above) or feral, and the latter have managed to avoid being eaten by the neighborhood coyotes, so they are not typical tabbies. I've also seen dogs that have been injured by cats, and cats that have been mauled or killed by dogs.

tnjrp
2011-Nov-10, 04:56 AM
Standard poodles are large dogs. And they can be very agressiveIndeed the only dog that has actually bit me with a purpose to injure was a standard poodle. It was only a "warning shot" tho so I still have all the fingers on my left hand.

Nicolas
2011-Nov-10, 10:02 AM
Indeed the only dog that has actually bit me with a purpose to injure was a standard poodle. It was only a "warning shot" tho so I still have all the fingers on my left hand.

It's in a jar, on the cupboard. ;)

We have a red cocker. Here's hoping that he doesn't have the rage syndrome, but at 12 weeks old that's not relevant anyway. He's a cuty. A cocker, so you can't raise him like you would raise a labrador, but still a cuty. :)

parallaxicality
2011-Nov-10, 04:26 PM
We had a springer once. It bit another dog's eye out. I've never trusted small dogs since then.

swampyankee
2011-Nov-11, 02:46 AM
Springers aren't small; they're probably about 40 pounds: bigger than my American cocker. My generic level of trust for large dogs tends to be roughly nil, even though I'm fairly good at reading doggy body language, because it's not unknown for some breeds to, ahem, lie: akitas have been known to attack out of a play bow. This isn't to say small or medium sized dogs can't do damage -- a lone dingo could seriously injure an unarmed adult human -- but the damage would accumulate much faster when from a 150 pound great dane (which have been known to kill cattle).

As I've said before: dogs, especially small dogs, are much quicker than some people seem to realize. As I said, my parents' last dog was able to cover 5 feet before the neighbor's cat could turn around.

Moose
2011-Nov-11, 02:58 AM
Heh. My young cousin's chihuahua got a little protective some years back. First thing I saw was this massive gaping maw coming right at me. Had it not been a warning shot, I would surely have been bludgeoned to death by a pair of 600lb (each) tonsils.

Little weasel then hops off my cousin's knee and onto mine, in a "Hey, it wasn't personal. We still cool?" sort of way.

tnjrp
2011-Nov-11, 06:06 AM
As I've said before: dogs, especially small dogs, are much quicker than some people seem to realize. As I said, my parents' last dog was able to cover 5 feet before the neighbor's cat could turn around.Well, yes, dogs certainly aren't all clumsy by any means. My Corgis, when young, were able turn on a dime while going full tilt. The benefits of having a very low center of gravity I assume. That is probably how my Pembroke was able to run down a young hare once when he was a young 'un himself: the poor hare made the mistake of figuring a quick jump aside at some point in the chase would throw the annoying stumpleg off the trail - BIIIG mistake!

parallaxicality
2011-Nov-11, 12:58 PM
ut the damage would accumulate much faster when from a 150 pound great dane (which have been known to kill cattle).


Seriously? A Dane? I had a Dane once; he was frightened of week-old kittens. I'm not joking.

Buttercup
2011-Nov-11, 02:46 PM
Seriously? A Dane? I had a Dane once; he was frightened of week-old kittens. I'm not joking.

Back in 2004 we had a tomcat named Radar (our current cat is his niece). He ran off.
:( Anyway, prior to leaving us he would sometimes go into the fenced-in portion of our property, where Prince -- our Chow Chow (now dead) -- lived.

Radar would traipse in. Stand there. Not hissing or menacing. I think he did enjoy the reaction he got though:

Prince would stare in absolute fear of Radar, and cringe away. That dog actually *submitted* to the cat as now being "in charge" of his territory. :lol:

Doodler
2011-Nov-11, 03:58 PM
This is not always the case that feline aggression wins out. My sister had a pair of huskies that didn't get along with one of her cats. The end of one battle went very badly for the cat. They were days finding what was left of him. :(

Sorry to be a downer, but that kind of thing is all well and cute until one of the combatants REALLY feels threatened.

parallaxicality
2011-Nov-11, 07:10 PM
Well, to be fair that was two against one, and huskies are basically wolves with residency permits.

Moose
2011-Nov-11, 08:33 PM
Well, to be fair that was two against one, and huskies are basically wolves with residency permits.

I was thinking the same things. Huskies are barely domesticated, and it doesn't take much at all for a smaller critter to trigger chase+hunt mode.

TJMac
2011-Nov-13, 12:35 AM
Attitude has a lot to do with it. We all probably know of specific instances of dogs who don't fit the mold. My Jack Russell is quite aggressive, and I doubt that she understands that her two German Shepard partners do all the heavy lifting when it comes to being threatening.

I don't think Ive ever known a Doberman that wasn't rated high on the scary/aggressive list, but I bet there are some out there that are quite laid back and gentle.

I've known of at least one Great Dane and one St. Bernard that was very aggressive and on the do-not-mess-with list. Whereas most dogs of those breeds I meet are quite gentle and non-aggressive. Chihuahuas always seem to be extremely aggressive, even tho they would appear to not be able to back up their bark. The only pure-bread Cocker we ever owned was, I suspect, deranged. He loved us totally, but would not abide anyone else. (exception, when my young niece and nephew lived with us, he accepted them instantly, they had been abused, maybe he could sense something....)

As far as big cats go, (someone mentioned them) some dogs have been used to deal with them too. Afghan hound was used to hunt snow leopards, and Rhodesian Ridgeback has been used to hunt, and/or guard against African lions. Most situations have to be taken in context I think.

Still kind of amusing to think of tabby winning against a much bigger canine opponent.

TJ

flogger11
2011-Nov-13, 10:20 PM
Anybody that thinks a house cat can take on ANY 25-30lb+ dog possessing the "right atitude" is a fool.

Nicolas
2011-Nov-14, 08:52 AM
But in most cases, if the dog has half a brain (dog brain that is :)), he'll avoid the confrontation whenever possible because it won't be pretty.

tnjrp
2011-Nov-14, 09:06 AM
As has been mentioned already, most predators avoid confrontation with remotely same size predators. That is a big part of why the herd protecting dogs do work against large felines, wolves etc. - they aren't so much expected to fight for the herd tho they will of course, in a pinch.

Like me, predators prefer to only hit those who are clearly smaller than themselves :p

Nicolas
2011-Nov-14, 02:05 PM
Smaller and not too pointy.

Kaptain K
2011-Nov-14, 11:16 PM
Anybody that thinks a house cat can take on ANY 25-30lb+ dog possessing the "right atitude" is a fool.

My brother owned a 25 lb polydactyl (extra toes) Main Coon cat. I'd take him in a figh against any similar sized dog, no matter the dogs "attitude"

tnjrp
2011-Nov-16, 06:43 AM
Yesterday they showed a video clip of wintertime bear hunting in Russia in the local news. I've heard of the Russian Bear Dogs of course but I don't recall ever seeing any in action (even on film). It had no qualms whatsoever attacking an adult brown bear. Mind you, it was a HUGE dog. I think those beasts might well give even cougars a run for their money.

Buttercup
2011-Nov-16, 03:09 PM
My brother owned a 25 lb polydactyl (extra toes) Main Coon cat. I'd take him in a figh against any similar sized dog, no matter the dogs "attitude"

I've seen video clips of 2 common house cats either chase off OR tree a bear. :D

Nicolas
2011-Nov-16, 03:37 PM
Black bears are known to be sissies. Well, unless you happen to meet a mommy black bear. That's the evil brand of black bears.

parallaxicality
2011-Nov-16, 04:29 PM
Evil? That's a harsh description of "taking risks for the lives of your children".

Doodler
2011-Nov-17, 12:33 AM
Evil? That's a harsh description of "taking risks for the lives of your children".

There's a "protective" mother, and then there's a helicopter mother with teeth, claws, the ability to run at 30 miles per hour, and thinks you look tasty...

Nicolas
2011-Nov-17, 08:09 AM
Well, "evil"...consider it the difference between reactive and (overly) proactive protection of the children. Understandable, but not nice if you're the subject of her actions.

Taeolas
2011-Nov-17, 02:33 PM
Speaking of bears reminds me of the recent Sluggy Freelance story arc (http://sluggy.com/comics/archives/daily/111020)

Anyways, back to the topic. My parents have some cats (down to 4 now I think; long story), and a Samoyed Husky. The Sammy is outside most of the time, but the garage is his dog house, complete with a big doggy bed. We also had a couple of stray cats that would come in occasionally. What would happen usually is the stray would curl up in the middle of the doggy bed, and Triton (the Sammy), being the wuss he is, would just stand there and look at the cat. And instead of nudging it aside or anything, he would end up laying on the concrete floor with his head on the pillow (which without the cat is more than big enough for him) looking completely pitiful.

Otherwise he and the cats get along great. Or rather each tends to ignore the existence of the others as long as the dog doesn't get in the way of the cats so it works out in the end. :)

Buttercup
2011-Nov-22, 09:24 PM
...no, the other is a beautiful young white-and-gray tomcat which prowls this area.

The dog slows to look over its shoulder. The cat stands staring like "...and STAY OUT!" Dog growl/yaps again and resumes a full harried run. :lol:

The cat stands there quietly. Then looks over at me (I give him a "Feline Power!" salute). Then saunters back into the neighbor's yard.

This cat was in our yard again, about half an hour ago. I've named him Elliott. He buzzes past our front door (mesh) to see our female cat. He is a very fine tomcat. Let me get within 5 feet of him. At one point he was rolling back and forth on a small mound of dirt (left over from a lawn project), looking very pleased with himself. ^_^

I asked Elliott if he'd like to be the father of my grandkittens.

No reply. :lol:

He wouldn't come to me (not surprising), but after leaping over the fence and onto the sidewalk below did pause, look back and give me a parting "Meow." ^_^