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theville24
2011-Nov-01, 06:41 PM
Hi! I am currently a senior at my high school and a student in my astronomy II class. I've ran out of ideas on astronomy topics to write about, so I'm asking anybody out there if you have some suggestions I could use! Thank you for your time and I would really appreciate your help!

swampyankee
2011-Nov-01, 06:58 PM
You ran out of topics? Boy, they must keep you really busy working in that class!

Have you done:
Current astronomical nomenclature
Traditional star names
Celestial mechanics
Three-body problem
Lagrange points
Relativity (General, Special)
Stellar structure
Stellar evolution
Stellar chemistry
Interstellar gas and dust clouds
Nebulae
Galaxies
Galaxy clusters
CMB
Planets
Exoplanets
Habitability
White dwarfs
Brown dwarfs
Neutron stars
Pulsars
H-R diagram
Spectroscopy
Exoplanet detection methods
Transits
Timekeeping
Astronomical coordinate systems
Famous astronomers (this is a very large topic)
Telescopes
Globular clusters
Open clusters
Asterisms
Binary and multiple stars
Celestial navigation
GPS
Electromagnetic spectrum
Neutrino telescopes
Natural satellites
Man-made satellites
Deep space probes
Planetary rings (most obviously, Saturn's)
Origin of the Moon
Radar astronomy (Venus was imaged from Earth by radar)
Van Allen Belts
Cosmic rays
Meteorites
Kuiper Belt objects
Oort Cloud
Extrasolar planetary systems
Solar astronomy
Each of the planets plus Pluto (individually)
Asteroids
Near-Earth objects
Chicxulub
Creation of heavy elements
Supernovae
Novae
Super-massive stars
Black holes
Large-scale structure of the Universe
Light pollution
SOFIA
Space-based telescopes
Astronomy throughout the electromagnetic spectrum
Star formation

Need I go on?

emc

John Jaksich
2011-Nov-02, 01:24 PM
You ran out of topics? Boy, they must keep you really busy working in that class!

Have you done:
Current astronomical nomenclature
Traditional star names
Celestial mechanics
Three-body problem
Lagrange points
Relativity (General, Special)
Stellar structure
Stellar evolution
Stellar chemistry
Interstellar gas and dust clouds
Nebulae
Galaxies
Galaxy clusters
CMB
Planets
Exoplanets
Habitability
White dwarfs
Brown dwarfs
Neutron stars
Pulsars
H-R diagram
Spectroscopy
Exoplanet detection methods
Transits
Timekeeping
Astronomical coordinate systems
Famous astronomers (this is a very large topic)
Telescopes
Globular clusters
Open clusters
Asterisms
Binary and multiple stars
Celestial navigation
GPS
Electromagnetic spectrum
Neutrino telescopes
Natural satellites
Man-made satellites
Deep space probes
Planetary rings (most obviously, Saturn's)
Origin of the Moon
Radar astronomy (Venus was imaged from Earth by radar)
Van Allen Belts
Cosmic rays
Meteorites
Kuiper Belt objects
Oort Cloud
Extrasolar planetary systems
Solar astronomy
Each of the planets plus Pluto (individually)
Asteroids
Near-Earth objects
Chicxulub
Creation of heavy elements
Supernovae
Novae
Super-massive stars
Black holes
Large-scale structure of the Universe
Light pollution
SOFIA
Space-based telescopes
Astronomy throughout the electromagnetic spectrum
Star formation

Need I go on?

emc



My personal favorite would be solar minima and the variable sun connection--

A good book for it is --

The Maunder Minimum and the Variable Sun-Connection

by

Willie Wei-Hock Soon & Steven H. Yaskell

It is technical where it needs to be --and has a good "human" (story) behind E. Walter Maunder and Annie Maunder-----husband and wife Astronomers from the turn of the twentieth century.

A good read.


And if you did not know---most good teachers now have computer tools that can tell if you have plagiarized your material in most ways.

My apologies to Swampyankee---some teens need more prodding than others---IMO

Not trying to steal any of your thunder.




Here is the link from Google Scholar:

http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=HfdG-HPiBdMC&oi=fnd&pg=PR9&dq=Maunder+Minimum+and+Sun-Earth+Connection&ots=LdG1LYQ-Cc&sig=xJGiuBGDIiL0duS75M4CQDGsi4Q#v=onepage&q&f=false






(http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=HfdG-HPiBdMC&oi=fnd&pg=PR9&dq=Maunder+Minimum+and+Sun-Earth+Connection&ots=LdG1LYQ-Cc&sig=xJGiuBGDIiL0duS75M4CQDGsi4Q#v=onepage&q&f=false)

swampyankee
2011-Nov-02, 06:33 PM
A student comes up to me and says "I can't think of a topic..." they're going to get one relevant to the current unit. "Fun" and "interesting" are not guaranteed, nor is "easy to research." I've dealt with high-school students and college freshmen, so I'd say all of them need some prodding. A few of them need very little prodding (these are frequently called "nerds," although it's amazing how many of the attractive, popular kids are in this category), some of them need just a bit more, and some need flaming wads of C4 attached to their backsides.

theville24
2011-Nov-02, 06:54 PM
Mucho gracias seņor

trinitree88
2011-Nov-02, 08:56 PM
Hi! I am currently a senior at my high school and a student in my astronomy II class. I've ran out of ideas on astronomy topics to write about, so I'm asking anybody out there if you have some suggestions I could use! Thank you for your time and I would really appreciate your help!

theville24. Go to every hardware store and garden center within driving distance. Ask them for a gallon of inflationary spacetime and five pounds of dark matter.
1.Inflationary spacetime, which expands superluminally (that's faster than the speed of light), carrying regular matter along with it, can be added to your vehicle's gas tank giving you millions of miles per gallon, so it won't cost you much to drive anymore.
2. The dark matter, if kept in a separate gallon can, will initially cause it to weigh more, but when the inflationary spacetime begins to get into the combustion chamber of your vehicle, will not be carried along with it, because it is not affected by the acceleration of the walls of the container it is in.....kind of like a ghost in Ghost-busters.....Da-dunt, da-dunt, duddah, duddah, da-dunt...you know the tune. It's inertia will keep it behind. It only interacts gravitationally when the signal to noise ratio in your data stream is too loud.
These hardware/garden center people are quite clever and will try to send you to the pallets of dehydrated bovung....that's bait & switch salemanship, and you don't have to put up with that in America. Insist that millions spent on studying this stuff bring something as fruitfull as a load of manure in the garden does, and they'll be sure to find you the right aisles, and fill your order. Won't they? pete

swampyankee
2011-Nov-02, 10:27 PM
theville24. Go to every hardware store and garden center within driving distance. Ask them for a gallon of inflationary spacetime and five pounds of dark matter.
1.Inflationary spacetime, which expands superluminally (that's faster than the speed of light), carrying regular matter along with it, can be added to your vehicle's gas tank giving you millions of miles per gallon, so it won't cost you much to drive anymore.
2. The dark matter, if kept in a separate gallon can, will initially cause it to weigh more, but when the inflationary spacetime begins to get into the combustion chamber of your vehicle, will not be carried along with it, because it is not affected by the acceleration of the walls of the container it is in.....kind of like a ghost in Ghost-busters.....Da-dunt, da-dunt, duddah, duddah, da-dunt...you know the tune. It's inertia will keep it behind. It only interacts gravitationally when the signal to noise ratio in your data stream is too loud.
These hardware/garden center people are quite clever and will try to send you to the pallets of dehydrated bovung....that's bait & switch salemanship, and you don't have to put up with that in America. Insist that millions spent on studying this stuff bring something as fruitfull as a load of manure in the garden does, and they'll be sure to find you the right aisles, and fill your order. Won't they? pete


Trinitree, are you participating in elastically elongating the student's tibia, fibula, and femur by applying tensile loading?

John Jaksich
2011-Nov-03, 01:47 AM
Trinitree, are you participating in elastically elongating the student's tibia, fibula, and femur by applying tensile loading?

In my opinion--it may be a little of over-exertion of within cerebral cortex.


By the way how is the weather? Do you have any Santa Ana winds to contend?

trinitree88
2011-Nov-03, 08:26 PM
Trinitree, are you participating in elastically elongating the student's tibia, fibula, and femur by applying tensile loading?

swampy. sorta. pete

swampyankee
2011-Nov-03, 10:03 PM
In my opinion--it may be a little of over-exertion of within cerebral cortex.


By the way how is the weather? Do you have any Santa Ana winds to contend?

Today was nice: sunny, clear, and 50s. Earlier was not so good, with an early snow storm that dropped up to 20in (50cm) of snow in the state, with about 15% of the people in the state without power. This is not making anybody terribly happy with the utility company that services those areas. No Santa Ana winds, mistrals, chinooks, or foehn winds: we've got the wrong topography.

theville24
2012-Feb-07, 07:56 PM
c2 = (299,792,458 m/s)2 = 89,875,517,873,681,764 J/kg (≈9.0 × 1016 joules per kilogram)
the energy is equivalent of one gram of mass that also equals 89.9 terajoules
:)

Romanus
2012-Feb-08, 12:13 AM
Flip through an issue of Astronomy or Sky and Telescope, and I'd be very surprised if you don't find something you don't want to write a paper on. Or just look up in the night sky and daydream (nightdream?) for a bit; something will probably come to you.

redshifter
2012-Feb-08, 01:49 AM
I'd think a paper about extrasolar planets would be an interesting topic; one of many...Maybe write about the history of extrasolar planet research, how they're discovered, what tools are used, etc.

theville24
2012-Feb-21, 07:44 PM
thanks romanus and redshifter

theville24
2013-Feb-20, 07:39 AM
You ran out of topics? Boy, they must keep you really busy working in that class!

Have you done:
Current astronomical nomenclature
Traditional star names
Celestial mechanics
Three-body problem
Lagrange points
Relativity (General, Special)
Stellar structure
Stellar evolution
Stellar chemistry
Interstellar gas and dust clouds
Nebulae
Galaxies
Galaxy clusters
CMB
Planets
Exoplanets
Habitability
White dwarfs
Brown dwarfs
Neutron stars
Pulsars
H-R diagram
Spectroscopy
Exoplanet detection methods
Transits
Timekeeping
Astronomical coordinate systems
Famous astronomers (this is a very large topic)
Telescopes
Globular clusters
Open clusters
Asterisms
Binary and multiple stars
Celestial navigation
GPS
Electromagnetic spectrum
Neutrino telescopes
Natural satellites
Man-made satellites
Deep space probes
Planetary rings (most obviously, Saturn's)
Origin of the Moon
Radar astronomy (Venus was imaged from Earth by radar)
Van Allen Belts
Cosmic rays
Meteorites
Kuiper Belt objects
Oort Cloud
Extrasolar planetary systems
Solar astronomy
Each of the planets plus Pluto (individually)
Asteroids
Near-Earth objects
Chicxulub
Creation of heavy elements
Supernovae
Novae
Super-massive stars
Black holes
Large-scale structure of the Universe
Light pollution
SOFIA
Space-based telescopes
Astronomy throughout the electromagnetic spectrum
Star formation

Need I go on?

emc

You have no idea the work that we do :D

schlaugh
2013-Feb-20, 10:59 PM
Especially in a year's time! :)