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drone technician
2011-Nov-02, 11:21 PM
If there are infinite parallel universes then where are they?

antoniseb
2011-Nov-03, 12:40 AM
If there are infinite parallel universes then where are they?
Not in this universe, so don't bother looking for them.

kevin1981
2011-Nov-03, 01:50 AM
Outside of our own universe so i doubt we could detect them, if there were such a thing.

drone technician
2011-Nov-03, 03:14 AM
Doesn't gravity reach across parallel universes?

Tensor
2011-Nov-03, 03:31 AM
Doesn't gravity reach across parallel universes?

Not that we know of. M-theory (which is not a theory) speculates that one of the reasons gravity is so weak is that it "leaks" into other dimensions.

Solfe
2011-Nov-03, 03:56 AM
There is a small flyer/pamphlet that comes with a subscription to Scientific American about multiverses. Your local library may have it, it is 4-8 pages long and they are republished every year. The same 4 pamphlets come each time you renew which is kind of annoying. I assume my alternate universe self is reading a different same four pamphlets much to his annoyance too. :)

Here is a link to a web article in SA about multiverses. (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=multiverse-the-case-for-parallel-universe)

As far as I can tell, there is no particular reason for there to be a multiverse, but the idea has some wow factor topped off with the 4 am funny feelings about the world people have on occasion.

Sam99
2011-Nov-07, 12:04 PM
Im still trying to get my mind around the many worlds, these other worlds are abstract & its all mathematics?


Not 3 dimensions located in far away location or extra dimensions (the bulk). but superimposed all on top in infinite dimensional Hilbert space?

I briefly read that extra dimension ideas can still work with mw?



There is a small flyer/pamphlet that comes with a subscription to Scientific American about multiverses. Your local library may have it, it is 4-8 pages long and they are republished every year. The same 4 pamphlets come each time you renew which is kind of annoying. I assume my alternate universe self is reading a different same four pamphlets much to his annoyance too. :)

Here is a link to a web article in SA about multiverses. (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=multiverse-the-case-for-parallel-universe)

As far as I can tell, there is no particular reason for there to be a multiverse, but the idea has some wow factor topped off with the 4 am funny feelings about the world people have on occasion.

what about the anthropic principle, more i read up on mw, it makes more sense rather then just particles appearing from probability.

Ivan Viehoff
2011-Nov-07, 01:59 PM
M-theory (which is not a theory) speculates that one of the reasons gravity is so weak is that it "leaks" into other dimensions.
But since we could never put such a hypothesis to the test, even if M-not-yet-a-theory were developed sufficiently to become a theory, with such an aspect it could not be described as a "scientific" theory.

The hypothesis of other universes can never be science.

Cougar
2011-Nov-07, 02:07 PM
If there are infinite parallel universes then where are they?

Exactly.

Cougar
2011-Nov-07, 02:26 PM
As far as I can tell, there is no particular reason for there to be a multiverse....

Well, there is a reason, but it's not a very good reason. String theorists sought a single string solution that would represent the features of our universe. But when they started coming up with 10500 different possible solutions, people like Leonard Susskind conjectured that there could actually be different universes corresponding to all those solutions. Such a scenario brings an added benefit: It could explain why our universe seems to be so "finely tuned." A little tweak in the physical constants here and there, and our universe would be quite different. Life might be unlikely to form at all. So if there are zillions of different universes, the fact that there is one as "finely tuned" as ours is not so surprising.

PraedSt
2011-Nov-07, 02:36 PM
I watched a popular science program the other day that had a lady claiming that a cold spot in the CMB is evidence for a parallel universe. Anyone else come across this?

Daffy
2011-Nov-07, 03:24 PM
The hypothesis of other universes can never be science.

Well, let's stop all research then.

kevin1981
2011-Nov-07, 04:15 PM
It could explain why our universe seems to be so "finely tuned." A little tweak in the physical constants here and there, and our universe would be quite different. Life might be unlikely to form at all. So if there are zillions of different universes, the fact that there is one as "finely tuned" as ours is not so surprising.
Or it could be a coincidence and we are very lucky !


I watched a popular science program the other day that had a lady claiming that a cold spot in the CMB is evidence for a parallel universe. Anyone else come across this?

I have read the same somewhere but I think it needs more looking into.

Cougar
2011-Nov-07, 09:40 PM
:neutral:
Or it could be a coincidence and we are very lucky !

Yes, we are indeed very lucky. But if we were not lucky, we wouldn't even know about it. :neutral:

Solfe
2011-Nov-07, 10:13 PM
I watched a popular science program the other day that had a lady claiming that a cold spot in the CMB is evidence for a parallel universe. Anyone else come across this?

I did. It was on Discovery Channel as I recall. I was falling asleep while watching so I don't know the name. The one thing that popped into my head was one of the plot lines from the SGU show about a cold spot in the CMB.

Tensor
2011-Nov-08, 04:54 AM
But since we could never put such a hypothesis to the test, even if M-not-yet-a-theory were developed sufficiently to become a theory, with such an aspect it could not be described as a "scientific" theory.

The hypothesis of other universes can never be science.

Well, if they ever figure out which equations are the right ones, it could, at some point, be a theory. Although I fully agree with you that the other universe part will never be science, parts of our current models could arguably fall into that same category. The theories are good, but parts of the theories can never really be known.

PraedSt
2011-Nov-08, 05:46 AM
I watched a popular science program the other day that had a lady claiming that a cold spot in the CMB is evidence for a parallel universe. Anyone else come across this?Found her and the program. Laura Mersini and What Happened Before the Big Bang

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laura_Mersini
Badly written article, but there's some stuff about cold spots and Dark flow..

ozark1
2011-Nov-08, 11:50 AM
Well, if they ever figure out which equations are the right ones, it could, at some point, be a theory. Although I fully agree with you that the other universe part will never be science, parts of our current models could arguably fall into that same category. The theories are good, but parts of the theories can never really be known.

Never is a long time. All we can say is that m-theory is not currently testable. If someone can make a prediction about this universe based on the existence of a neighbouring one, then we can start testing (hence the interest in gravity and supervoids).

selden
2011-Nov-08, 03:02 PM
Evidently many people either don't read or quickly forget the articles posted on UniverseToday.
Its URL is available in the Forum header image up above.

See Testing the Multiverse… Observationally! (http://www.universetoday.com/87927/testing-the-multiverse-observationally/)

by Vanessa D'Amico on August 3, 2011