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View Full Version : Razzies and Academy Awards: Neither matter much these days



Inclusa
2011-Nov-06, 03:33 AM
Razzies signify worst in movie making; Academy Awards signify the best, but it seems very few people pay attention these days.
During the 1980s and 1990s, Academy Awards were still prestigious and people pay considerable attention.
Nowadays, box office seems even more important than Academy Awards (than again, most Academy Award winning movies are blockbusters.)
It is not 100% positive that the Internet and DVDs reduce the number of theatre goers. (What is the last time you are in a theatre? For me, it is the last cruise 'cause nothing better to do.)

billslugg
2011-Nov-06, 04:36 AM
Every aspect of the moviegoing experience seems designed for minimum enjoyment. Ticket sales from fortified bunkers, High prices, loud sound systems, sticky floors, rude patrons, no ushers, interminable preshow offerings, imbecilic story lines and the usual Hollywood hatred of everything I find dear in this country.

I go about once per 5 years.

Gillianren
2011-Nov-06, 05:12 AM
Nowadays, box office seems even more important than Academy Awards (than again, most Academy Award winning movies are blockbusters.)

Not true, actually. It's generally speculated that one of the reasons the Academy went up to ten nominees was that no one had seen the nominees when there were only five. There were still mostly only movies that the average person hadn't seen, and The Hurt Locker currently holds the record for lowest box office numbers by a Best Picture winner. Most winners in the technical categories are blockbusters, but that's because blockbusters generally put more effort into categories like special effects and makeup. In general, however, getting Academy Award nominations does well for box office. It's known as the "Oscar bump."

geonuc
2011-Nov-06, 06:31 AM
It might be true, however, that the Academy Awards presentation is considerably less popular, probably for the same reasons that network television productions in general are less popular. Whether or not a film has garnered an Academy Award - or a nomination - still probably greatly affects the choices movie-goers make today.

It is a near certainty that internet streaming and advent of DVD's along with large HD televisions has affected the number of people who go out to see a movie. Unless I misremember, used to be movies routinely played to a packed or nearl-packed house, but not anymore. I still go out to the movies, though. Maybe 10 a year? That hasn't changed substantially for me in the past few decades.

Noclevername
2011-Nov-06, 03:00 PM
It's known as the "Oscar bump."

I used to love that dance.

Gillianren
2011-Nov-06, 05:42 PM
It might be true, however, that the Academy Awards presentation is considerably less popular, probably for the same reasons that network television productions in general are less popular. Whether or not a film has garnered an Academy Award - or a nomination - still probably greatly affects the choices movie-goers make today.

Oh, the presentation is plummeting in the ratings over recent years and routinely having difficulty finding hosts. And I imagine that's what has led to some of the dubious choices in recent years. But I know The King's Speech was crowded, when we went to see it around the time nominations came out, and the last Saturday matinée of Black Swan in Olympia was practically full. Certainly nomination in a major category tends to ensure that movies still in the theatre stay in the theatre for at least another few weeks.


It is a near certainty that internet streaming and advent of DVD's along with large HD televisions has affected the number of people who go out to see a movie. Unless I misremember, used to be movies routinely played to a packed or nearl-packed house, but not anymore. I still go out to the movies, though. Maybe 10 a year? That hasn't changed substantially for me in the past few decades.

Oh, I've been to many a near-empty theatre, even twenty years ago and more. And we still routinely go to movies where the house is pretty full. Of course, we also see a lot of kids' movies on opening weekend--but Toy Story 3 had been out for weeks when I finally got to see it, and the house was probably three-quarters full still.

starcanuck64
2011-Nov-06, 08:29 PM
I go about six times a year, there's not that much that appeals to me anymore. So many of the great ideas are being repackaged and the new theatres have a cold feeling as well as too low temperatures for my liking.

The best movie-going experience for me was seeing The Empire Strike Back in 75mm at the Stanley in Vancouver. It's a beautiful building, with a concert hall setup and great sound. I actually looked over my shoulder as the speeders enter the screen as they look for Han and Luke. It doesn't get any better than that. I know it's always been big business but the movie industry has lost some of it's soul over the last few decades and viewer interest shows it.

Inclusa
2011-Nov-07, 02:19 AM
I go about six times a year, there's not that much that appeals to me anymore. So many of the great ideas are being repackaged and the new theatres have a cold feeling as well as too low temperatures for my liking.

This still sounds quite a bit; actually, the sounds of theatres or live performances are typically on the load side.


Not true, actually. It's generally speculated that one of the reasons the Academy went up to ten nominees was that no one had seen the nominees when there were only five. There were still mostly only movies that the average person hadn't seen, and The Hurt Locker currently holds the record for lowest box office numbers by a Best Picture winner. Most winners in the technical categories are blockbusters, but that's because blockbusters generally put more effort into categories like special effects and makeup. In general, however, getting Academy Award nominations does well for box office. It's known as the "Oscar bump."

Awards are often double-edged swords; one way they prove the worth of certain movies; another way is the notion that movies that charm the critics have little public appeals.

Gillianren
2011-Nov-07, 03:07 AM
Awards are often double-edged swords; one way they prove the worth of certain movies; another way is the notion that movies that charm the critics have little public appeals.

Well, you know, the critics are experts in their field. The Oscars, unlike the Golden Globes, are also chosen by experts in the field--by the members of the Academy, all of whom work in the industry. Ergo, I tend to be more inclined to trust them, and the SAG Awards, and things along those lines, than someone who only goes to three movies a year and is easily impressed by Shiny.

Solfe
2011-Nov-07, 04:17 AM
I think the last (first run) movie I saw was Toy Story 3. I have a favorite theater, so it is a pretty comfortable experience.

I do go to the movies a lot in summer. There is a local theater that runs DVD released (or soon to be released) movies for free on Tuesday mornings for the kids. They must make a killing off of popcorn or something, 10 am is way to early for candy. I really enjoy the family time, plus some of the grownups are chatty. Yes, it is almost exactly the opposite reason for going to the theater than normal.

PS - I am dying to see Wall-e on the big screen again, but I suspect it is too old.

Jim
2011-Nov-07, 01:12 PM
Well, you know, the critics are experts in their field. The Oscars, unlike the Golden Globes, are also chosen by experts in the field--by the members of the Academy, all of whom work in the industry. Ergo, I tend to be more inclined to trust them, and the SAG Awards, and things along those lines, than someone who only goes to three movies a year and is easily impressed by Shiny.

But, but... look how close they are!

2011 Academy
Best Picture - The King's Speech
Best Actor - Colin Firth
Best Actress - Natalie Portman

2011 People's Choice
Best Picture - The Twilight Saga: Eclipse*
Best Actor - Johnny Depp*
Best Actress - Kristen Stewart*

Yeah, I gotta go with the Academy on this one (these three?).

*Not nominated for the Academy Awards.

Gillianren
2011-Nov-07, 06:50 PM
I will say I thought the Academy got Best Supporting Actress wrong last year (the girl from True Grit should have won, if they weren't going to give the teenager the dignity of nominating her in a lead performance), and I'm still irritated that Tron: Legacy wasn't even nominated for Visual Effects, Costume Design, and Original Score. So I'm not going to say that they always get it right, certainly. But they get it closer to right than anyone who calls what happens onscreen in the Twilight movies "acting."

geonuc
2011-Nov-07, 07:52 PM
Twilight as People's Choice Best Picture? What on earth are the criteria for those awards?

starcanuck64
2011-Nov-07, 10:01 PM
This still sounds quite a bit; actually, the sounds of theatres or live performances are typically on the load side.

It's way down from my movie going about a decade ago. I also find that movies tend to leave the theatre much faster than they used to and second run theatres are becoming rare(here anyway). I missed Super 8 by one week this year. on the positive side films show up on DVD much faster now and are inexpensive.

I also find the sound level in theatres loud.

Van Rijn
2011-Nov-07, 10:06 PM
I also find the sound level in theatres loud.

Painfully loud. I've worn ear plugs to the theater. And that's for what passes for "normal" sound levels in a theater these days. It doesn't make me love the experience.

Solfe
2011-Nov-07, 10:16 PM
But they get it closer to right than anyone who calls what happens onscreen in the Twilight movies "acting."

I thought Twilight won an award for "Best breathing and pout-y glaring".

Jim
2011-Nov-08, 01:01 PM
We've got two or three "dollar cinemas" in our area, showing films on their second run.

When the Oscar nominees are announced, many theaters will secure and run the "top" category nominees to take advantage of the publicity. There is one in Houston that will get the short feature nominees and run all of them (they can get), including the foreign language shorts.

And, yes, the sound level is too high. Couple that with Hollywood's propensity to play the "background" music high enough to drown out the dialouge, and it makes getting the DVD and using subtitles and the mute button on your tv remote very worthwhile features.

Gillianren
2011-Nov-08, 05:01 PM
Yeah, the one thing I resent is that I don't get a chance to see the shorts before the awards. In fact, the Academy releases discs of the nominated shorts most years--after the ceremony. And they don't include the documentary shorts, which I really want to see and have never found a venue for.

starcanuck64
2011-Nov-08, 06:10 PM
We've got two or three "dollar cinemas" in our area, showing films on their second run.

When the Oscar nominees are announced, many theaters will secure and run the "top" category nominees to take advantage of the publicity. There is one in Houston that will get the short feature nominees and run all of them (they can get), including the foreign language shorts.

And, yes, the sound level is too high. Couple that with Hollywood's propensity to play the "background" music high enough to drown out the dialouge, and it makes getting the DVD and using subtitles and the mute button on your tv remote very worthwhile features.

Vancouver had several second run theatres, usually older ones where the ticket price was about 75% that of the new mega-plexes and the sound systems didn't blow out your eardrums but Edmonton doesn't seem to have them. They do have arts theatres that show foreign and indie films but if you snooze you lose when it comes to mainstream films.

Inclusa
2011-Nov-20, 09:05 AM
Than again, they believe loud=great sound/Hifi effects?

Solfe
2011-Nov-23, 11:41 AM
Than again, they believe loud=great sound/Hifi effects?

I am all for being rattled and blow around in some theaters, but I find that silence/quiet is one of the more powerful effects. I hold that using silence for effect takes a certain amount of skill that many people in the movie industry don't have.

It doesn't even have to be complete silence; just a quiet moment/whisper/beat can be powerful. Rhett Butler didn't scream the line "My dear..." at Scarlett in Gone With the Wind, it was very low key and awesome. For a non-classic movie, almost all of the funny/powerful dialog in Die Hard and was done at a whisper (followed by violence and gun play, but the dialog really made that movie for me). Those examples are apples and kiwi, I know. :)

Ilya
2011-Dec-01, 03:15 PM
Except for IMAX, I went to maybe three movies since 2000.