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KABOOM
2011-Nov-16, 08:49 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15754786

Per Nature magazine, Eurpopa water may be much closer to surface than previously thought.

Cougar
2011-Nov-17, 01:26 AM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15754786
...Europa water may be much closer to surface than previously thought.

Here's the NASA News write-up. (http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/16nov_europa/) What I found significant was the volume of water was estimated to be similar to that of the North American Great Lakes.

kzb
2011-Nov-17, 01:03 PM
Here's the NASA News write-up. (http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/16nov_europa/) What I found significant was the volume of water was estimated to be similar to that of the North American Great Lakes.

What I noticed was the Grate Lakes :) Another quality NASA press release...

Squink
2011-Nov-17, 03:03 PM
Looking at data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft—which orbited Jupiter from 1995 to 2003—Schmidt and her team identified a region called Thera Macula that sits 1,300 feet lower than the surrounding surface.

A hypothetical visitor to Europa standing on the edge of Thera Macula would look down at a choppy, brownish field of ice full of knobs and spires, and see tall icebergs trapped here and there. Extrapolating from analogous situations occurring in Greenland or Antarctic ice, the researchers developed a model to account for the chaotic frozen terrain.http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/11/huge-lake-could-increase-chance-of-life-on-jupiter-moon.ars

So we have .obviously once connected icebergs located in a bowl shaped surface depression.

antoniseb
2011-Nov-17, 06:25 PM
I'm content to wait the 15-20 years it will take for a Europa orbiter to get funded, built, and sent there. This information is interesting, but not certain... and even if certain, I think the deep ocean there is more apt to be life supporting that these great-lakes sized things. I'm guessing Europa life will need to be near hydro-thermal vents.

borman
2011-Nov-18, 01:21 AM
Io is known to splatter some of its volcanic products into space that find their way onto the surface of Europa leaving colors that have been seen from orbit. One could monitor these particular regions for color changes relative to other regions on Europa to rule out space weathering. Changes would indicate active chemistry responsible for changes. This might initiate discussion whether the chemsitry was biotic or abiotic if energy is transfered as potential nutrients. For example, there may be the possibility of sulphur loving extremophiles that find Io's debris as food.

Ilya
2011-Nov-18, 08:55 PM
Is Europa's ice thin or thick? At chaos terrain, it's both! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00003266)


Titled "Active formation of 'chaos terrain' over shallow subsurface water on Europa," it's a mathematically rigorous paper that describes a mechanism in which a thick-iced Europa can produce chaos terrain, without liquid water ever melting through to the surface. Europa's ocean remains at great depth, but there are perched "lakes" close to the surface, whose formation drives the creation of chaos. In a way, it's a bit of thin ice on top of a lot of thick ice.

Not sure if this is the right forum for this.

PraedSt
2011-Nov-18, 09:49 PM
Emily Lakdawalla's really good at explaining complex things. This model seems like a partial-win for both sides, so I bet neither side is really happy.

Swift
2011-Nov-18, 10:14 PM
I've merged the thread on Europa that was started in Space Exploration with the existing one in Astronomy