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trinitree88
2011-Nov-22, 01:06 PM
When you look at a light curve, (or an oscilloscope ) there's a sharp peak in the signal. The sharper the rising slope, the faster the rise time. These guys are hoping for a local supernova to answer some physics questions (don't we all?), but admit the likelihood is small.....(but not zero). In their case, it will distinguish between neutrino mixing hierarchies. SEE: http://arxiv.org/abs/1111.4483

antoniseb
2011-Nov-23, 05:09 PM
When you look at a light curve, (or an oscilloscope ) there's a sharp peak in the signal. The sharper the rising slope, the faster the rise time. These guys are hoping for a local supernova to answer some physics questions (don't we all?), but admit the likelihood is small.....(but not zero). In their case, it will distinguish between neutrino mixing hierarchies. SEE: http://arxiv.org/abs/1111.4483

If there IS a supernova on average every fifty years in the Milky Way, we should observe one in our lifetimes (neutrino-wise) even IF visually it is hidden by clouds, or on the other side of the galaxy. I look forward to the results.

StupendousMan
2011-Nov-24, 01:43 AM
It's an interesting question: if a Type II supernova were to occur on the other side of the Milky Way's center, so that it was invisible (or faint enough to be insignificant) optically, would we notice it?

How frequently are the neutrino detectors running? How often is more than a single system running at a time? How good are the angular positions derived from the neutrino detectors? How often do the scientists running the detectors check the results?

I suspect that it would be quite difficult to find a counterpart if it was so extinguished that only mid-IR telescopes could see it, since there aren't that many telescopes working at those wavelengths, and they don't have large fields of view --- do they?

antoniseb
2011-Nov-24, 01:41 PM
...How frequently are the neutrino detectors running? How often is more than a single system running at a time? How good are the angular positions derived from the neutrino detectors? How often do the scientists running the detectors check the results? ...

I get the impression from this paper (http://arxiv.org/abs/1111.5530), that the up-time for the several neutrino detectors is most of the time, so the chances of missing it these days is low. As for directionality... Its hard to tell. If there are any UHE neutrinos, IceCube or ANTARES should be able to point it out in the sky.

Such an event would be about five times closer that SN1987A, so instead of 19 neutrinos, the same detectors would see about 500. I'm sure someone would be notified promptly.

StupendousMan
2011-Nov-24, 03:00 PM
Another paper describing current (2010) status of detectors is

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JPhCS.203a2077F

which suggests that the chances of at least two detectors being active
at any time are pretty good.

PraedSt
2011-Nov-24, 09:12 PM
In case this helps:

Status of Neutrino Astronomy - a mini-review on neutrino telescopes, Oct 2011 (http://arxiv.org/abs/1110.6840)

StupendousMan
2011-Dec-01, 09:37 AM
A nice paper describing the search for supernovae with the Ice Cube neutrino detector and the ROTSE automated optical telescopes appears in today's astro-ph:

http://arxiv.org/abs/1111.7030

antoniseb
2011-Dec-01, 02:15 PM
A nice paper describing the search for supernovae with the Ice Cube neutrino detector and the ROTSE automated optical telescopes appears in today's astro-ph: ...
I liked the paper... too bad the result is null so far. I imagine that in a decade or so we will take what we learned from IceCube and build an even better one: larger and more sensitive to lower energy neutrinos.