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Gomar
2011-Nov-26, 02:38 AM
http://m.io9.com/5661369/have-we-already-received-an-alien-signal-from-earthlike-planet-zarmina


sounds like a mistake, but any updates?

formulaterp
2011-Nov-26, 05:38 AM
From what I can tell, he discovered the signal in Dec. 2008 and hasn't repeated since. I think we can safely conclude that the alien civilization on Gliese 581g is waiting to see if we respond with a signal of our own.

Sardonicone
2011-Nov-26, 03:37 PM
Let's start by sending a bootlegged copy of "War of the Worlds". The Tom Cruise version.

John Jaksich
2011-Nov-26, 05:07 PM
http://m.io9.com/5661369/have-we-already-received-an-alien-signal-from-earthlike-planet-zarmina


sounds like a mistake, but any updates?


No updates ---but this does paint the SETI in a (almost?) pathetic light---:doh:especially if it proves to be false---

IMO---he should have published the finding much differently---rigorous error analysis--followed by a disclaimer--in the very least

Van Rijn
2011-Nov-27, 06:47 AM
Zarmina? Okay, looking it up that's apparently an informal name given to the Gliese 581g exoplanet claim, but it sounds pretty silly given that there is a good chance it doesn't exist. At least wait until and if there is independent confirmation of the claim.

And, for a claim of a signal, there would need to be solid evidence and confirmation too.

neilzero
2011-Nov-27, 11:33 PM
There are significant problems with confirming signals as messages from an extrasolar planet. The modulation method (such as broad spectrum, single side band or FM/FM) will likely not be one used on Earth. If we figure out how to correctly recover the audio, part of the audio is likely outside the range of human hearing, and the language is likely not much like English or another Earth language. We won't have a Rosetta stone, so the translation will likely be mostly guess work. Worse, the signal will likely be brief and repeat at intervals of a century or so, if the signal is sent for that long. This is especially true for communication between a deep space probe and the home world. This will likely be very narrow beam; the probe is moving, the home world is moving and our receiver is moving due to Earth's rotation, Earth orbiting the sun; and our sun orbiting the galaxy. I think you can see that an unlikely straight line between, Earth, ET's probe and ET home world will be brief and repeat very rarely. At best the signal received will be weak, so SETI will be using very narrow beam, high gain antennas which will typically be pointing in the wrong direction during the seconds that the signal is receivable. Neil

formulaterp
2011-Nov-29, 07:01 AM
There are significant problems with confirming signals as messages from an extrasolar planet. The modulation method (such as broad spectrum, single side band or FM/FM) will likely not be one used on Earth. If we figure out how to correctly recover the audio, part of the audio is likely outside the range of human hearing, and the language is likely not much like English or another Earth language. We won't have a Rosetta stone, so the translation will likely be mostly guess work. Worse, the signal will likely be brief and repeat at intervals of a century or so, if the signal is sent for that long. This is especially true for communication between a deep space probe and the home world. This will likely be very narrow beam; the probe is moving, the home world is moving and our receiver is moving due to Earth's rotation, Earth orbiting the sun; and our sun orbiting the galaxy. I think you can see that an unlikely straight line between, Earth, ET's probe and ET home world will be brief and repeat very rarely. At best the signal received will be weak, so SETI will be using very narrow beam, high gain antennas which will typically be pointing in the wrong direction during the seconds that the signal is receivable. Neil

I think they are working under the assumption that any signal is intended to be received by us or anyone else who might be listening/watching, not just intercepting a signal between probes.