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Cougar
2011-Dec-13, 04:22 PM
I haven't had a cat around the house in a while, so when I noticed there was a cat show in town, I figured I'd go and see if any of the cattery folk had any nice kittens for sale. OMG, one lady had a 7-month old golden-eyed red Abyssinian boy that was super friendly and, well, that was it. I took him home and named him Bobby Redford.

15951

A couple weeks later, I took him in to get neutered. They asked if I wanted a chip implanted at the same time. Well, OK. They asked if I wanted pre-surgical blood work done, adding that it's not usually necessary in healthy animals. Well, what do I know about blood work? He's healthy, so I guess he doesn't need this add-on. The doctor later called and said the operation was successful. When I picked him up, they said he'd be a little woozy, would be happy to be home, and then he'd probably just go to sleep. They were right. I stayed up with him until about 10:00, he went to sleep, I went to bed.

I got up about 5:00 and checked on him. He was not good. He was listless, practically limp. I was glad to find a 24-hour emergency cat hospital and ran him over there. They did everything they do, but 4 hours later he was dead.

Well, that was devastating. I don't know what happened. The surgery did appear successful. The incision was not bleeding or anything. The emergency doc suggested he might have had a mild respiratory infection that got out of hand after the shock of the surgery. I don't know. He seemed quite healthy. Seems like someone should be responsible, but I don't know who. Jeez, I hope it wasn't me!

:cry:

HenrikOlsen
2011-Dec-13, 04:36 PM
I guess you're asking because with the "benefit" of hindsight you're starting to question your decision not to have a blood sample taken pre-op.

Without being a vet myself, but having been in the situation of looking back and thinking if only "they'd" done xxx she'd be alive now, I'll say that from the description you made the best choice given the information available to you at the time.

That the blood test quite possibly wouldn't have prevented what happened anyway isn't much help, I know, but it's still something to ponder.

And I'm sorry for you, in the picture he looks like a very beautiful charmer.

Tog
2011-Dec-13, 04:59 PM
Sorry, Cougar.

No real answers here, but I do have two experiences that might be starting points. The GF picked up a cat from the shelter and it had a small sore on it's nose. This was a symptom of a respiratory infection that is quite common to cats housed together. There would also have been a generally listlessness and a runny nose. The sore on ours looked like a claw scratch or knife cut between the nostrils.

The other instance was the GF old, mean cat. We needed to shave her because the mats were so bad she couldn't urinate past them. Our attempt didn't go very well and the GF could very well have ended up in the ER if the cat would have moved. We took her to a groomer in a vet clinic and asked about sedation. They said that they would need to run blood work because of her age. It's possible that the cat's kidneys will not "come out" of the sedation. This is a risk with any cat, but older ones are more apt to have a problem. I don't know if the blood test would have caught some trait that indicates a greater risk to an individual or not, but they did tell us that if the kidneys didn't come back, there was nothing that could be done. There was no way to "reboot" them.

As Henrik said, based on the information you had at the time, you made a perfectly reasonable choice. When you look at how many young animals are neutered every year, and what the success rate is, the odds are certainly in favor of everything being okay. I doubt I would have gotten the blood work either.

Cougar
2011-Dec-13, 05:05 PM
That the blood test quite possibly wouldn't have prevented what happened anyway isn't much help, I know...

Well, it would help a little. I've done a little research, and one site says it shows whether the cat has good kidney and liver function. Well, he wasn't having any trouble using his cat box. There didn't seem to be any problem there. Or anywhere. I'm just wandering around in a haze....

Cougar
2011-Dec-13, 05:16 PM
Sorry, Cougar.

Thanks, Tog.


There would also have been a generally listlessness and a runny nose.

He had no runny nose or eyes. And he liked to run up the flight of stairs in the time it took me to go one step. Your description of kidney failure sounds like a possibility....

Swift
2011-Dec-13, 06:08 PM
Cougar, I am so sorry for your loss.

I don't have any insights on what happened. You might want to drop Gethen (http://www.bautforum.com/member.php/740-gethen) a PM, she isn't active around here much any more (but she is active on another forum I belong to), but her husband is a vet.

I also suggest you talk to the vet who did the surgery.

R.A.F.
2011-Dec-13, 07:59 PM
The morning after the surgery, and the cat dies?

Yeah, I'd want to have a talk with the vet who performed the surgery...

Cougar
2011-Dec-13, 08:31 PM
Yeah, I'd want to have a talk with the vet who performed the surgery...

Well, the emergency hospital did notify him, and he called me to offer his condolences, as well as do a little damage control, probably. Of course, I asked what could have gone wrong, and he didn't know. He offered a couple speculations that nobody could have known about. He said the operation only lasts a couple minutes, and there was nothing atypical about it. I asked about the anaesthesia, but he waved that off because Bobby seemed OK when I got him home, just a little woozy. He was following me around and kind of wanted to play, but you want him to just take it easy. As instructed, he got no food or water after 10:00 pm the night before the procedure. What.a.bummer!

Buzz-Lite-Punch
2011-Dec-14, 01:49 AM
Bad luck there, Cougar
You must be gutted. :(

I was going to have my cat chipped with a microchip tracking device years ago when my cat took a lousy jump and ended up with broken leg that had me, in a bit of a frantic twits for weeks.

I think chipping a cat or dog seems a little in-dignifying why not around their collar, I don’t think I’d fancy being probed with chip.
Yeah sure lots of dogs and cats going missing each year and chipping them with GPS is easy to find them.

Anyway try to vent your feelings and get a new kitten and forget about chipping. My cat is an indoors cat so no way no chance he can get out as I’m on the top floor unless he got smart and managed to sneak past me when going out as cats are very quiet, soft-paws!

When my cat was confined to cage for 6 weeks until his leg healed as I couldn’t let him or encourage him to run around. I had to tend to my cat a few times when caged he threw up, not a furball, he vomited after his meals and was eating poorly for a few weeks. Drinking steadily, oh that was rough patch a few years ago.

Now he’s leaping and running and only since started to jump onto my lap.

It might also be shock that the cat can’t understand. They do feel pain and they can express it.

When I took my cat home for the first time from the vets, while still at the vets a dog sniffed at my cat’s cat-box and he freaked out and jumped around and I had to put him in straight-away because I feared he might have hurt his leg and again and I was right.

They had to operate on my cat for second time as the pin in his leg had moved out of place, and that distressed me.
But I’m puzzled your cat goes in for simple operation and less than a day later passes away.

gethen
2011-Dec-14, 01:50 AM
Hi Cougar. I'm so sorry about your cat. I'm also a cat lover and I know how much it hurts to lose one.

I Worked in my husband's veterinary clinic for more years than I care to recall, and I can tell you that once in a while, regardless of the skill or care of the veterinarian, an animal unexpectedly dies after routine surgery. I can recall maybe 3 instances in the 15+ years I was working in the small animal section. In none of those cases was there a clear cause of death, and on at least one occasion, the owners OK'd an autopsy and wanted toxicology tests sent to the nearest veterinary college.

Cat neuters are indeed simple procedures. Bleeding is minimal to non existent, the usual anesthesias are very safe, and losing a cat after one is very unusual. I am assuming that your cat was not released into your care until he was sufficiently recovered from anesthesia to stand and swallow, and if he was following you around, that seems a given.

I wish I could tell you what happened, but I can't. Cats are indeed particularly susceptible to kidney problems (we've lost two to kidney shutdown) so it's possible that that's what happened, but who knows? I'm not aware of any congenital problems in Abyssinians that might have caused a problem with surgery. Yes, pre-op blood work might have revealed some problem, but there's no guarantee of that either, and for a cat neutering on a young, healthy cat, one would certainly not have expected to find anything to prohibit doing the surgery. Like I said, it's a very simple, minimally invasive procedure.

And please, don't beat yourself up over not having the pre-op blood work done or getting help sooner or anything else. People occasionally die unexpectedly after routine surgeries as well. No medicine, human or veterinary, is perfect and we still don't know everything there is to know about how the body works.

I hope you'll find another cat to love when you're ready. I'm sure there's a wonderful pet out there waiting for you.

R.A.F.
2011-Dec-14, 02:11 AM
Gethen!!!....so good to see ya...your input has been missed here.

HenrikOlsen
2011-Dec-14, 02:26 AM
I think chipping a cat or dog seems a little in-dignifying why not around their collar, I don’t think I’d fancy being probed with chip.
Yeah sure lots of dogs and cats going missing each year and chipping them with GPS is easy to find them.
Chipping isn't GPS, it's short-range RFID. Same idea as tattooing a number in the ear but slightly easier to read into a computer for looking it up online.
Typical max read distance is on the order of 10 inches if you're lucky.
It won't find the cat unless it's already caught and someone checks its chip to see who owns it.

I didn't get my cats chipped, but they did get the ear tattoo with an id number while they were getting neutered.

tashirosgt
2011-Dec-14, 02:28 AM
Cougar,

The best way to be informed of the cause of death is to have an autopsy done. I've had several pets that have died and I always asked for an autopsy. Most vets will do this without charge since they learn from it and they don't often get to perform autopsies.

Buzz-Lite-Punch
2011-Dec-14, 10:51 AM
Chipping isn't GPS, it's short-range RFID. Same idea as tattooing a number in the ear but slightly easier to read into a computer for looking it up online.
Typical max read distance is on the order of 10 inches if you're lucky.
It won't find the cat unless it's already caught and someone checks its chip to see who owns it.

I didn't get my cats chipped, but they did get the ear tattoo with an id number while they were getting neutered.

Oh kinder like barcode scaning of sort then.

A cat with a tattoo what will they think of next? Why not just get the cat shaved with Mohican while you’re at it.

Heid the Ba'
2011-Dec-14, 11:35 AM
Seems like someone should be responsible, but I don't know who. Jeez, I hope it wasn't me!

:cry:

It wasn't you. You took a healthy cat to a reputable vet for a routine procedure, and followed the pre and post op care. As Gethen said, sometimes it just happens. It is astonishing what they can survive but sometimes they just die on you.

That was a good looking Aby, I've never had one but have had a couple of the similar looking Oriental Tabbies.

Cougar
2011-Dec-14, 02:08 PM
Thanks Gethen and Buzz and Heid. Appreciate your comments. A lot.