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The Rat
2001-Nov-08, 03:07 AM
I'm shocked. How about the rest of you?

http://www.weeklyworldnews.com/bizarre/bizarre.cfm?subobjectid=42&instanceid=12594

;^)



_________________
Free speech; exercise it or shut up!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: The Rat on 2001-11-07 22:08 ]</font>

DStahl
2001-Nov-08, 06:28 AM
My stars and garters! I read the gold-bulge-in-Oregon story ('cause I live in Eugene, Oregon) and there's a germ of truth in it: an area just west of the South Sister mountain has indeed be bulging gradually in the past year or two, probably due to inflow of magma somewhere down there. The part about the vein of gold is utter baloney, of course.

Phobos
2001-Nov-08, 06:39 AM
I like this bit ...


They took only four seconds to reach their targets in England

There you have it, 4 seconds from Germany to England, No wonder the scientists got bored, lost interest on the war, and started planning a Moon shot !

Later on they say;

had designs for the V5, a three-stage version of the V2 with a booster powerful enough to escape Earth

Very helpful that, here they are telling us that only the V5 would be powerful enough to leave the Earths orbit. Now what was that they said was found on the Moon ?

Jeff /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Phobos on 2001-11-08 01:46 ]</font>

Chip
2001-Nov-08, 07:07 AM
On 2001-11-07 22:07, The Rat wrote:
I'm shocked. How about the rest of you?

http://www.weeklyworldnews.com/bizarre/bizarre.cfm?subobjectid=42&instanceid=12594

;^)

Guess I'll be the party pooper and mention that the V2 was not capable of reaching the moon. It remained within Earth's upper atmosphere, and took a lot longer than 4 seconds to come down (often tumbling) at supersonic speed...but you all know that.

What was more interesting was Bat Boy the Musical! and most interesting to me, "Page 5"
woo hoo! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Chip on 2001-11-08 02:09 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Chip on 2001-11-08 02:10 ]</font>

Simon
2001-Nov-08, 07:51 AM
&lt;snip>

Simon
2001-Nov-08, 07:52 AM
&lt;snip>
By 1945, they had designs for the V5, a three-stage version of the V2 with a booster powerful enough to escape Earths gravity
&lt;/snip>
LOL!!! Is my history wrong, or was V-E Day in 1944??

WHarris
2001-Nov-08, 11:16 AM
On 2001-11-08 02:52, Simon wrote:
<snip>
By 1945, they had designs for the V5, a three-stage version of the V2 with a booster powerful enough to escape Earths gravity
</snip>
LOL!!! Is my history wrong, or was V-E Day in 1944??


D-day was June 6, 1944.

V-E Day was in May, 1945.

2001-Nov-08, 12:45 PM
HUb' said that on November 8, 2001 = (p9 of 10)
so this may be 11 or 10. And i2 read the
"Sisters" part. just 10's of min prior 6:23 A.M.
in the edit version it was 10 and elleben both
and edit time shoulld be 6:26 A.M.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: HUb' on 2001-11-08 07:48 ]</font>

ToSeek
2001-Nov-08, 02:35 PM
Actually, I'm kind of impressed because the middle paragraphs of the article are remarkably accurate. Do you think there are some frustrated real journalists at the WWN?

Wally
2001-Nov-08, 03:35 PM
No wonder Germany lost the war. . . Aimed for England, but hit the Moon. Sheeesh! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

Donnie B.
2001-Nov-08, 08:13 PM
Ahh, WWN... my favorite bastion of journalistic integrity.


This is such a highly accurate and well-researched article that it's hard to find anything to quibble with... but...


...developed the V1, a pilotless bomber,...

The V1 is usually described as a flying bomb, or primitive cruise missile, rather than a pilotless bomber. Oh well, even WWN gets a detail or two wrong, every now and then... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

The Rat
2001-Nov-08, 08:48 PM
The V1 is usually described as a flying bomb, or primitive cruise missile, rather than a pilotless bomber. Oh well, even WWN gets a detail or two wrong, every now and then... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif


Actually there was a piloted version. The test flights were conducted by the legendary Hanna Reitsch. It was intended as a suicide device similar to the Japanese Oka. Never saw combat though.

Picture at;

http://www.algonet.se/~molrog/Luftwaffe/fiesler/images/lacoupoleV1a.jpg

_________________
Free speech; exercise it or shut up!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: The Rat on 2001-11-08 15:53 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: The Rat on 2001-11-08 15:58 ]</font>

Tom
2001-Nov-12, 02:38 AM
I'm surprised the article doesn't mention the "German battleships on the moon" Urban Legend, where metal from sunken battleships was used covertly by German rocket scientists to build these moon rockets.

Wonderful!

2001-Nov-12, 01:14 PM
[quote]
On 2001-11-08 07:45, HUb' wrote:
HUb' said that on November 8, 2001 = (p9 of 10)
HUb' November 12, 2001 6:49 A.M. PST
by now there are 16 pages to this thread
and i {above was only on page 10}
so someone must have deleted something?
{maybe} the thing that bugs me most
{ its the time } really the edit time belows "Standard"
::" YEAH ":: I was now [1-11-12 6:54 A.M.] page 17

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: HUb' on 2001-11-12 08:17 ]</font>

Conrad
2001-Nov-12, 01:41 PM
Ha! A V2!
Our Daily Sport (which can broadly be described as a comic with bosoms, hardly a newspaper), revealed that a London bus had been found on the Moon!
Eat that, Werner, we got there *before* you!

Chip
2001-Nov-16, 11:50 PM
On 2001-11-12 08:41, Conrad wrote:
Ha! A V2!
Our Daily Sport (which can broadly be described as a comic with bosoms, hardly a newspaper), revealed that a London bus had been found on the Moon!
Eat that, Werner, we got there *before* you!


One of my favorites was from a USA tabloid about 10 years ago. "WWII American Bomber Found ON MOON!" They even had a cover picture. What was funny was the plane they choose was a Douglas B-19; very few made and all accounted for, and they had it parked filling a crater! (I think it was Tyco.) The wings spanned the entire crater! The B-19 was a big plane, but not that big! It was also in pre-WWII markings.

A movie from the 60s, “First Men in the Moon,” opened with a sequence depicting Astronauts landing on the Moon and discovering a tattered old British flag from around 1904. That was fun! Rule Britannia!

ToSeek
2001-Nov-17, 06:12 PM
On 2001-11-16 18:50, Chip wrote:
One of my favorites was from a USA tabloid about 10 years ago. "WWII American Bomber Found ON MOON!" They even had a cover picture. What was funny was the plane they choose was a Douglas B-19; very few made and all accounted for, and they had it parked filling a crater! (I think it was Tyco.) The wings spanned the entire crater! The B-19 was a big plane, but not that big! It was also in pre-WWII markings.



I think that was another one for the Weekly World News.

James
2001-Nov-17, 10:49 PM
On 2001-11-17 13:12, ToSeek wrote:


On 2001-11-16 18:50, Chip wrote:
One of my favorites was from a USA tabloid about 10 years ago. "WWII American Bomber Found ON MOON!" They even had a cover picture. What was funny was the plane they choose was a Douglas B-19; very few made and all accounted for, and they had it parked filling a crater! (I think it was Tyco.) The wings spanned the entire crater! The B-19 was a big plane, but not that big! It was also in pre-WWII markings.



I think that was another one for the Weekly World News.

Yep. I can almost rememeber the front page. They must have some very imaginitive writers at both WWN and the Sun.

lpetrich
2001-Nov-18, 04:16 AM
The Vengeance Weapon #1 (V-1) was essentially the world's first cruise missile. It would be aimed somewhere, a timer in it would be started, and it would be sent on its way. When its timer ran out, it would get put into a steep dive into the ground.

The Vengeance Weapon #2 (V-2) was the world's first ballistic missile.

Pilots using their airplanes as cruise missiles had been an occasionally-used desperado tactic when they got wounded or their airplanes got damaged. In the Battle of Midway, where US planes sank four Pearl-Harbor-veteran Japanese aircraft carriers, some of the planes were sent after fleeing Japanese cruisers. They could not score a hit because of the cruisers' anti-aircraft fire, but the plane of one Richard E. Fleming caught fire from the AA fire, and he decided to crash his plane into the rear turret of one of the fleeing cruisers. It leaked gasoline, which started a humongous fire in the ship's engine room. That crippled ship was sunk on the next day. Richard E. Fleming got a posthumous Congressional Medal of Honor for this suicide attack.

The success of such suicide attacks, and Japan's losing many of its experienced pilots in battles like "The Great Marianas Turkey Shoot" inspired Japan's commanders to rather reluctantly start a deliberate program of airplane-as-cruise-missile suicide attacks, the Kamikaze Tokubetsu Kogekitai ("Divine-Wind Special Attack Forces"). The name comes from a previous time when Japan was up against a big enemy, a 140,000-man Mongol-Chinese-Korean invasion force in 1281. They could barely advance into a well-defended beach, and one day, a hurricane came by and wrecked their fleet. This hurricane became celebrated as a divine wind (kamikaze), and the "Special Attack Forces" got their name from their hoped-for effect.

Japan's "Oka" flying bombs were essentially piloted ALCM's with a range of 10-20 mi. Japan also had "Kaiten" suicide minisubs (piloted torpedoes), and even suicide divers with strapped-on explosives.

Turning to Germany, Hanna Reitsch had hoped to organize a similar sort of suicide squadron with piloted V-1's, and she even volunteered to pilot one into the Westminster Palace Parliament building in London. But it was late in the war, and her side surrendered before that plan could be put into action.

And in general, the German commanders had had little taste for suicide missions.

Gas Giant
2001-Nov-19, 05:36 PM
On 2001-11-12 08:41, Conrad wrote:
Ha! A V2!
Our Daily Sport (which can broadly be described as a comic with bosoms, hardly a newspaper), revealed that a London bus had been found on the Moon!
Eat that, Werner, we got there *before* you!


I'm sure the Sport reported that the London Bus was found at the North Pole (complete with picture of said bus encased in an iceberg with interested penguins (yes, I know) looking on). They did have their own version of the "World War II Bomber Found on Moon!", though. I think their explanation of how it got there was that it was pulled by a 'passing black hole'.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Gas Giant on 2001-11-19 12:39 ]</font>

lpetrich
2001-Nov-20, 12:41 AM
One can easily tell that that bus picture is bogus, because penguins live in the Southern Hemisphere, meaning that that bus would have to have been in Antarctica, and not the North Pole.

Donnie B.
2001-Nov-20, 12:59 AM
On 2001-11-19 19:41, lpetrich wrote:
One can easily tell that that bus picture is bogus, because penguins live in the Southern Hemisphere, meaning that that bus would have to have been in Antarctica, and not the North Pole.


I think that's what Gas Giant meant with his parenthetical remark "yes, I know".

DEW
2001-Nov-20, 04:39 AM
[quote]
On 2001-11-17 23:16, lpetrich wrote:

The success of such suicide attacks, and Japan's losing many of its experienced pilots in battles like "The Great Marianas Turkey Shoot" inspired Japan's commanders to rather reluctantly start a deliberate program of airplane-as-cruise-missile suicide attacks, the Kamikaze Tokubetsu Kogekitai


Boy I hate to nit pick, but, one of the reason's that the "Great Marianas Turkey Shoot," was such a lopsided American victory was that Japan's pre-war supply of experienced pilots had already been consummed, primarily during the Solomons campaign. Other than that, good analysis.

Hey, maybe I should start a bad history site.




<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: DEW on 2001-11-19 23:40 ]</font>

Russ
2001-Nov-20, 05:15 PM
Guess I'll be the party pooper and mention that the V2 was not capable of reaching the moon. It remained within Earth's upper atmosphere, and took a lot longer than 4 seconds to come down (often tumbling) at supersonic speed...but you all know that.


Chip:

Your point above about the V-2's tumbling down, on Jolly Ol' England, begs another observation about the picture that went with the article.

Did you notice that the missle was fully in tact? Hardly a scratch let alone a dent or bent stabalizer fin. One would think that, after acquiring Earth escape velocity, then falling into the Moon's gravity well, that it would be scattered across the lunar landscape like a smashed pumpkin.

Call me a nit picker if you must but I think that photo was FAKED! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_rolleyes.gif

Kaptain K
2001-Nov-20, 05:49 PM
Call me a nit picker if you must but I think that photo was FAKED!
What! The WWN fake a photo? NAH! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif

DEW
2001-Nov-20, 10:50 PM
Russ writes:

"Call me a nit picker if you must but I think that photo was FAKED! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_lol.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_rolleyes.gif"

I have conclusive proof that the photo was faked:

1. Where are the stars?
2. Those shadows just cannot be right.
3. The radiation ... oh forget it

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: DEW on 2001-11-20 17:52 ]</font>