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htfdtw
2012-Jan-04, 03:27 AM
This has been puzzling me... if a black hole is spherical how can it have another side?

A

antoniseb
2012-Jan-04, 08:32 PM
This has been puzzling me... if a black hole is spherical how can it have another side?
I'm not a believer in wormholes, but the general idea would be that while the black hole's event horizon might be spherical in our three dimensions, that in higher dimensions, its shape could be (using a 3D allegory here) Cylindrical.

vasiln
2012-Jan-04, 09:07 PM
At least for casual usage, the 'other side' of a black hole probably refers to the inside versus the outside.

eburacum45
2012-Jan-05, 02:01 AM
A very good page with a clear movie of flight through a wormhole can be found here
http://www.spacetimetravel.org/wurmlochflug/wurmlochflug.html
I recommend viewing the longer version, as it shows what happens when you pause near the edge of the throat itself.

The cubical boxes are added for visualisation purposes, and allow you to see the way space-time deforms near the hole. From a distance there appears to be three concentric cubes of different colours, but the innermost cube magically becomes the outermost cube after you pass through. Note as well the way the red cube, which defines the 'throat' of the hole, deforms into an infinite plane when you are actually at the point of passing through the hole.

In short the wormhole is a spherical region of space which appears to briefly deform into an infinite plane (with a circular hole in it) as you pass through.

Using the wurmlochflug page as reference material, I've made an attempt to visualise the apperance of a wormhole in this image for Orion's Arm
http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs70/i/2011/308/6/3/wormhole_in_deep_space_by_eburacum45-d4f3ivg.jpg
(It's not quite right, but I'm getting there...)

Cougar
2012-Jan-05, 10:43 PM
if a black hole is spherical how can it have another side?

What do you mean? The Moon is roughly spherical. One side faces Earth; one side faces away from Earth. :confused:

pzkpfw
2012-Jan-06, 12:22 AM
What do you mean? The Moon is roughly spherical. One side faces Earth; one side faces away from Earth. :confused:

The context is in terms of "wormhole" - the idea of going into the black hole and back out somewhere else. (Note the thread title).

Without invoking other dimensions (as antoniseb covered it well) a person such as the O.P. would wonder how going into the black hole (from any direction) could lead anywhere else.

e.g. land on your Moon, near side, far side, whatever, and dig - you'll only end up inside the Moon.

Noclevername
2012-Jan-06, 01:30 AM
Wormholes and black holes are not the same thing. Hypothetically and depending on which equations you use, certain types of fast-rotating black holes might be able to generate wormholes, but that's as close a connection as they have.

htfdtw
2012-Jan-06, 02:22 AM
Thanks everyone for the replys. To eburacum im bout to watch movie.! Hopefully i learn a lot from it.

but yes my question is if spherical and you go through it how can you go anywhere but just another part of the hole. Put this fabric plane of the universe i didnt consider

Adamsavage
2012-Jan-14, 09:51 PM
This has been puzzling me... if a black hole is spherical how can it have another side?

A

I've always thought that "black holes" are not actually a hole in space, based on the explanation of a black hole, it's nothing more then a extremely heavy and dense star, that has so much gravity that not even light can escape it.

slang
2012-Jan-15, 12:21 AM
I've always thought that "black holes" are not actually a hole in space, based on the explanation of a black hole, it's nothing more then a extremely heavy and dense star, that has so much gravity that not even light can escape it.

Which explanation would that be? I don't think your description is accurate but it might be a context thing. I think others here are far better than me in explaining but I'll try if I have to.. :)

Adamsavage
2012-Jan-15, 12:24 AM
Which explanation would that be? I don't think your description is accurate but it might be a context thing. I think others here are far better than me in explaining but I'll try if I have to.. :)

Pretty much any show I've ever watched on Discovery, or National Geo that talks about them really..They basically say it's this literal hole that sucks everything into it.

whimsyfree
2012-Jan-17, 04:04 AM
Wormholes and black holes are not the same thing. Hypothetically and depending on which equations you use, certain types of fast-rotating black holes might be able to generate wormholes,

The opposite transition (e.g. Einstein-Rosen wormholes collapsing into blackholes as soon as something tries to transit them) seems to be much more commonly referenced in the literature.