PDA

View Full Version : Microlensing Study Says Every Star in the Milky Way has Planets



Fraser
2012-Jan-11, 08:30 PM
How common are planets in the Milky Way? A new study using gravitational microlensing suggests that every star in our night sky has at least one planet circling it. “We used to think that the Earth might be unique in our galaxy,” said Daniel Kubas, a co-lead author of a paper that appears this week [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/92531/microlensing-study-says-every-star-in-the-milky-way-has-planets/)

jfribrg
2012-Jan-11, 09:31 PM
I'm curious about this study. The explanation I saw was that it extrapolated the results of relatively nearby microlensing studies to the entire population of stars in the galaxy. Is that what they did or am I mistaken? I thought that it was impossible for stars in dense clusters (and those near the center of the galaxy) to have planets with stable orbits. Wouldn't this eliminate a huge number of stars from the extrapolation?

whimsyfree
2012-Jan-12, 11:24 AM
I'm curious about this study. The explanation I saw was that it extrapolated the results of relatively nearby microlensing studies to the entire population of stars in the galaxy. Is that what they did or am I mistaken? I thought that it was impossible for stars in dense clusters (and those near the center of the galaxy) to have planets with stable orbits. Wouldn't this eliminate a huge number of stars from the extrapolation?

I don't think stars in dense clusters are that close. However the original claim that every star "in our night sky" (we can take this to mean every star in the universe) is reckless. So there's not a single star in about 1022 around which planets failed to form for whatever reason, or formed and then were lost? Big call.

Trakar
2012-Jan-12, 06:34 PM
How common are planets in the Milky Way? A new study using gravitational microlensing suggests that every star in our night sky has at least one planet circling it. “We used to think that the Earth might be unique in our galaxy,” said Daniel Kubas, a co-lead author of a paper that appears this week [...]

More... (http://www.universetoday.com/92531/microlensing-study-says-every-star-in-the-milky-way-has-planets/)


“We used to think that the Earth might be unique in our galaxy”

Who thought this and when was this?

It certainly wasn't the Greeks, the Middle Ages philosphers, the earliest astronomers or anyone withn the last century or so? Sounds like a straw man designed to inflate and exaggerate the significance of their own rather "affirming the evident" finding.

Seriously?!

The paper deals with planets in general not Earth-like planets.