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kevin1981
2012-Mar-17, 03:34 PM
Recently, i was thinking about the fact that i could have a heart attack at any moment and die, it is a real possibility, even
though i am only 30 years old.

It frightens me a little to think this could happen. Then i was thinking about death and the fact i would not know i was dead, it
is a very bizzaire concept to try and wrap my head around.

Not sure where i am going with this to be honest. I was just wondering what people think about death and the fact that
we are aware of our own mortality, and does it frighten you at all ?

Solfe
2012-Mar-17, 03:45 PM
I am not afraid of dying, I am afraid of my children dying. That really bothers me.

I don't have most accurate and effective method of risk assessment at my disposal. I seem to be defective in that regard.

Buttercup
2012-Mar-17, 03:49 PM
No.

What does make me somewhat afraid is how I'm going to die.

Everyone wants to "go" peacefully and without pain. Many don't.

danscope
2012-Mar-17, 04:54 PM
As far as dying, there's no stopping it. The secret of life is to live each day as best you can , and when your time comes to pass, you will have no regrets.

Dan

profloater
2012-Mar-17, 04:56 PM
The acceptance of the inevitabilty makes it obvious that every day is important. As King Charles said (approximately) " the prospect of death in the morning concentrates the mind wonderfully" so the certain knowledge does nag at wasted time, but as someone else said the trick is to be sure at the end which was the wasted time. Tommorrow I may be myself with yesterday's seven thousand years.... so fill the cup that cheers- another mangled quote, that one from the Rubaiyat. as is... One thing is certain, that life flies, one thing is certain, the rest is lies. ... Reasons to be cheerful? Life is a great adventure.

slang
2012-Mar-17, 05:01 PM
I was just wondering what people think about death and the fact that
we are aware of our own mortality, and does it frighten you at all ?

I think it's just "the end", and don't fear that at all. I'm somewhat worried how my absence would affect others close to me.

And what Solfe and Buttercup said.

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-17, 05:02 PM
Recently, i was thinking about the fact that i could have a heart attack at any moment and die, it is a real possibility, even
though i am only 30 years old.

It frightens me a little to think this could happen. Then i was thinking about death and the fact i would not know i was dead, it
is a very bizzaire concept to try and wrap my head around.

Not sure where i am going with this to be honest. I was just wondering what people think about death and the fact that
we are aware of our own mortality, and does it frighten you at all ?

What you are experiencing is the extremely strong survival instinct humans have developed.

Romanus
2012-Mar-17, 05:13 PM
Dying itself? No.

Not fulfilling what I want to do in the time allotted: definitely.

parallaxicality
2012-Mar-17, 05:24 PM
I've contemplated suicide pretty much every day of my life since, oh I dunno, about 1985. I have gone over in my head every single conceivable method of ending a life, and envisioned every possible physical and emotional outcome. I haven't done it yet. I suppose that means I'm afraid of dying.

Solfe
2012-Mar-17, 05:36 PM
I would like to amend my statement after reading other peoples posts: Pain bothers me a lot; not getting things done bothers me.

Not getting all I want to do done, then pain ,then death would bother me. I try not to think about it much.

I used to play a game that when you died would send a message in response to attempted actions:
"You are dead, you must await rescue..."

If you tried too many times the messaging would change to:
"You are obviously bored and dead. It could be worse, you could be bored and in pain."

Gillianren
2012-Mar-17, 06:06 PM
I've contemplated suicide pretty much every day of my life since, oh I dunno, about 1985. I have gone over in my head every single conceivable method of ending a life, and envisioned every possible physical and emotional outcome. I haven't done it yet. I suppose that means I'm afraid of dying.

My personal suicidal ideation goes back almost that far; the fact that I haven't done it, I do not attribute to fear. I attribute it to the fact that I generally want to live more than I want to die. Not to mention the fact that, when I'm depressed enough to consider suicide, I'm usually too depressed to move. As others have said, it's pain that worries me, and the prospect of my daughter dying, and things along those lines. My own death doesn't scare me; I adjusted to the idea that it would happen in 1983, when my dad died and nothing I could do would change that. The only thing which really worries me about my own death is the impact it will have on those around me. Everything else is just fear of pain, which is healthy and natural.

Trebuchet
2012-Mar-17, 06:26 PM
I don't particularly fear dying. I do worry about getting old and infirm. My wife and I have spent the last seven years looking after elderly parents. We have no children. My wife's health is not very good so I'm likely to wind up looking after her. Who's going to take care of me?

HenrikOlsen
2012-Mar-17, 06:26 PM
Having witnessed death it isn't something I'm afraid of, how I die is a concern though.

Moose
2012-Mar-17, 06:45 PM
I'm not afraid to die. I'm afraid to live past my quality of life. I'm terrified to live beyond my ability to die on my own terms.

ravens_cry
2012-Mar-17, 06:51 PM
I'm not so much afraid of dying as saddened at the prospect of not seen more of the Story. Humanity could be on the cusp of some huge changes, changes that could potentially change in radical way what it means to be human, whether space will remain the final frontier or if it will be expanded into as a new home for humanity, or a new resource to be exploited.
I want to see how this all turns out.

Cougar
2012-Mar-17, 06:57 PM
Recently, i was thinking about the fact that i could have a heart attack at any moment and die....

I had that stark realization at one time, too. I learned that an occasional premature ventricular contraction was common and nothing to worry about. Serious heart malfunctions don't typically happen out of the blue. Unless there's a history of heart problems, it would be highly unlikely. Even if there are heart problems, medical and pharmaceutical technologies these days are pretty sophisticated...


I was just wondering what people think about death and the fact that we are aware of our own mortality, and does it frighten you at all ?

Well, yeah, i don't want to die. Life is the ultimate "trip." :) Death is something to be avoided. :hand: But everybody dies. That doesn't mean you shouldn't give death a reasonable fight. But it's not something to obsess about, either. Living is too valuable to waste it worrying about dying. ;)

danscope
2012-Mar-17, 07:14 PM
I take a vitamin called CoQ 10 each day. It is very good for your heart muscles. Be good to your body and prosper.
Dan

kevin1981
2012-Mar-17, 07:31 PM
I take a vitamin called CoQ 10 each day.
Thanks Dan, i will look into that. I do take daily vitamins so another can not do any harm !

Actually, i am not scared of death so much but as other people have mentioned, i do not want to be in pain. But as also mentioned above
i guess that is a natural thought process.

Swift
2012-Mar-17, 07:52 PM
I was just wondering what people think about death and the fact that
we are aware of our own mortality, and does it frighten you at all ?
Yes, I am extremely afraid of death; it is almost certainly my single greatest fear. It is the no-longer-existing that scares me the most. I have spent untold nights awake about it since I was in my early teens.

Buttercup
2012-Mar-17, 08:02 PM
But Swift, once we're no longer existing we won't know it.

Raven's Cry:
I'm not so much afraid of dying as saddened at the prospect of not seen more of the Story. Humanity could be on the cusp of some huge changes, changes that could potentially change in radical way what it means to be human, whether space will remain the final frontier or if it will be expanded into as a new home for humanity, or a new resource to be exploited.
I want to see how this all turns out.

I wouldn't want to see how it ALL turns out, but I am glad to have been young during the transition from the Space Age to the Digital Age.

I think of a handful of people my age who died, say, around 1993; they missed so much. And just barely missed it!

My one desire is to see a human mission to Mars before I die. I'll be very disappointed if that doesn't happen in my lifetime.

Otherwise? I'm ready to check out at a certain age.

publiusr
2012-Mar-17, 08:18 PM
My one desire is to see a human mission to Mars before I die. I'll be very disappointed if that doesn't happen in my lifetime.



We got folks working on that.

When young, I used to think that I was the only person who liked Star Trek. It was special in a pre-internet age. I once thought (in the pre-internet age) that a storm-chasing movie would be cool. Then we got blogs and the movie TWISTER.

Now, I know that if I pass on, I won't be missed. There are others who will have interests in the same things. It makes one less unique, yes--but it is comforting all the same...

Jim
2012-Mar-17, 08:24 PM
If someone knows an alternative, I'm all ears.

I'm not afraid of death, I just don't look forward to it. With any luck, it will come quickly and painlessly, although a little warning so I can say my goodbyes would be nice.

I hope there's an afterlife and I really want there to be a Rainbow Bridge. But if there's not, I'll never know.

astromark
2012-Mar-17, 08:53 PM
WE, thats you and I. Can not avoid the end of life we call death.

Not passing on, not going to the other side, not fading away.

DEATH. final and ending. A little honesty by all is apparent. None of are keen on the idea.

but, I am sure a understanding can be arrived at.

That a time comes for us all when life becomes such misery that death becomes a relief.

A failing hart or a advanced overaggressive cancer and many other predicaments can leed us to Death.

Accidental or deliberate death must be separated as life's the prevailing option I cherish..

I do not want for death. I enjoy life and living so much. However I can imagine as seen first hand the

prolonged suffering of the sick and dieing.. It can be very ugly. A want to avoid such is natural..

The final act of life is death. A may not like it., but its there and can not be avoided.

Except that, and enjoy as best you can, LIFE. Live it. Share it. Love it.

danscope
2012-Mar-17, 09:08 PM
There remains a subtle influence from the good side of the force which lingers after our passing unto those who would welcome it's influence. It may appear irrational and removed from scientific proof and certainly not universally understood.
But amoung those who love and those who have been loved, there are sometimes felt an influence we can't really explain. And to anyone else, remains meaningless, but within one's heart gives comfort and hope. There is more to the universe than is dreamt of in our philosophy, like the Bard said.
Best advice is to lose your hate and nurture your love and understanding of that which surrounds you.

" Michael Sullivan was my great friend,...... but I don't ever remember telling him that. "
.....from an obscure movie about a few friends in a land far,far away .

Buttercup
2012-Mar-17, 09:20 PM
I hope there's an afterlife and I really want there to be a Rainbow Bridge.

I have conflicted feelings about this. If there is a next life and it's NICE...yes.

Otherwise? Speaking only for myself of course, if once I'm dead "that's it," I wouldn't mind.

Probably a lot of individual hope vs apathy towards the concept of a next life has to do with how much the individual has enjoyed this one.

ravens_cry
2012-Mar-17, 09:30 PM
Raven's Cry:

I wouldn't want to see how it ALL turns out, but I am glad to have been young during the transition from the Space Age to the Digital Age.

I think of a handful of people my age who died, say, around 1993; they missed so much. And just barely missed it!

My one desire is to see a human mission to Mars before I die. I'll be very disappointed if that doesn't happen in my lifetime.

Otherwise? I'm ready to check out at a certain age.
Well, I've seen how 2001 and 2010 actually turned out and I could potentially live to see 2061, but it is unlikely I'll see 3001.
Am I selfish to want to?

Buttercup
2012-Mar-17, 09:35 PM
Well, I've seen how 2001 and 2010 actually turned out and I could potentially live to see 2061, but it is unlikely I'll see 3001.
Am I selfish to want to?

No, not at all.

LaurelHS
2012-Mar-17, 09:46 PM
Yes, I am extremely afraid of death; it is almost certainly my single greatest fear. It is the no-longer-existing that scares me the most. I have spent untold nights awake about it since I was in my early teens.
I have similar feelings. I have an anxiety disorder and I'm a naturally thoughtful person, so that's probably not surprising. For some reason, it makes me feel better to know that I'm not alone in worrying about death and feeling uncertain about what (if anything) comes after... all of humanity is in this together.

Gillianren
2012-Mar-17, 10:19 PM
Thanks Dan, i will look into that. I do take daily vitamins so another can not do any harm !

Not true. You can overdose on vitamins just like anything else, and most vitamins are better gotten from food than pills.

kevin1981
2012-Mar-17, 11:40 PM
Not true. You can overdose on vitamins just like anything else, and most vitamins are better gotten from food than pills. It is okay, I only take 1 multi vitamin a day :)

Chuck
2012-Mar-18, 12:15 AM
It seems that evolution by natural selection has designed me a brain that wants to keep its body alive, so of course I have an aversion to the idea of dying. I don't know if I'd call it being afraid, but then it doesn't seem to be looming in my immediate future. Maybe I'll feel differently on my death bed.

On a higher level, I realize that there will be no immortality for me no matter what. Even if ageing can be halted, diseases cured, war abolished, crime ended, and accidents avoided; the current me is still temporary. The things that make me who I am such as my beliefs, goals, desires, and opinions that change little from day to day will, over time, fade away until the person I am now no longer exists. There won't be any moment of death when it could be said that I ceased to exist, but the person I am now will some day be gone nonetheless. This has already happened to my ten year old self. He never died, but he's no longer with us. He gradually changed into me. The same thing will happen to the current me if I live long enough.

IsaacKuo
2012-Mar-18, 01:15 AM
When I was younger, I was deathly afraid of dying, without ever having had a romance.

Then I met the love of my life.

After being married and enjoying many wonderful experiences with her, I was no longer afraid of dying. I could die any time and be at peace with it. It's not like I'd ever welcome it--there's always more I'd like to do, and people who would be hurt if I left. But for myself, I am fundamentally satisfied. I've experienced what I wanted most in life. Everything else is gravy.

SeanF
2012-Mar-18, 03:54 AM
After being married and enjoying many wonderful experiences with her, I was no longer afraid of dying. I could die any time and be at peace with it.
Just out of curiosity, have you told your wife that, now that you're married, death doesn't seem so bad anymore? :)

I don't know about "afraid," but I very much do not want to die.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Mar-18, 04:31 AM
I've gotten to the point in life where my greatest fear is to not take the road less traveled by.

danscope
2012-Mar-18, 05:23 AM
My cardiologist has no problem at all with CoQ 10.

mike alexander
2012-Mar-18, 05:27 AM
Not afraid at all. Some days I rather look forward to it.

swampyankee
2012-Mar-18, 01:39 PM
Dying? I don't worry about it constantly, so I guess I'm not "afraid" of dying, although I tend to avoid walking on the edges of cliffs, crossing the street in front of taxicabs (these tend to be lethal in New Haven), or playing Russian roulette.

danscope
2012-Mar-18, 05:15 PM
I can tell you that I am constantly on the watch and look out for the "Cellphone Zombies" . :(
They will take you to your grave .

R.A.F.
2012-Mar-18, 05:41 PM
Death is inevitable. Why "fear" something that can not be changed?

Tinaa
2012-Mar-18, 06:14 PM
I've gotten to the point in life where my greatest fear is to not take the road less traveled by.

Me too. I recently reread the book, Who Moved my Cheese? In it a character asks, "What would you do if you weren't afraid?" I don't want to regret NOT doing something just because I'm afraid of failing, of looking foolish, etc.

Swift
2012-Mar-18, 06:15 PM
Death is inevitable. Why "fear" something that can not be changed?
You say that like our fears are under our voluntary control that we decide to fear something or not by a logical debate. Whether it is spiders or clowns or death, fears doesn't seem to be something we can control.

tnjrp
2012-Mar-19, 08:10 AM
Dying? I don't worry about it constantly, so I guess I'm not "afraid" of dyingIn that sense, me neither.

But I'm not at all enamoured of the idea of not existing any more some day. It's sorta Curious Electric (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQnd8wpScj0) for me.

I don't usually think about dying of course, I have my hands full trying to live instead of just being alive.

IsaacKuo
2012-Mar-19, 09:37 AM
Just out of curiosity, have you told your wife that, now that you're married, death doesn't seem so bad anymore? :)
Yes, she knows. She wants more, before she will have been satisfied--kids, family, etc. We're on it.

Fazor
2012-Mar-19, 01:45 PM
Short answers since I hate this topic - Fear death?

Do I walk around afraid that something could kill me at any moment? No
Am I terrified by the thought of dying? Yes. So I refuse to think about it. :-P

Paracelsus
2012-Mar-19, 01:57 PM
I have a severe peanut allergy, such that I may go into anaphylactic shock and die if I eat something with peanuts in it. I've had enough close calls with this allergy over the course of my life (since I was 13 months old) to become used to the idea of my death. I don't seek it, but it is an inevitable part of life. When it does come, the best one can do is meet it with courage and dignity.

SeanF
2012-Mar-19, 02:15 PM
Death is inevitable. Why "fear" something that can not be changed?
Besides what Swift said about being unable to control what we fear, why would it make more sense to fear something you can control than something you can't?



Just out of curiosity, have you told your wife that, now that you're married, death doesn't seem so bad anymore? :)
Yes, she knows. She wants more, before she will have been satisfied--kids, family, etc. We're on it.
I honestly can't tell if you got my joke or not. :think:

Jim
2012-Mar-19, 02:29 PM
I honestly can't tell if you got my joke or not. :think:

He obviously hasn't been married long enough. The gallows humour kicks in after the 4th or 5th year.

***

There's the story of the street corner preacher who gathered a crowd and started talking about death and what waited for them... the good place or the bad place. Surely they wanted to go to heaven, didn't they? He asked them to raise their hands if they wanted to go to heaven. About half did.

He saw his challenge, so be began some serious preachifying, telling them about the alternatives, heaven or that other place. He described both in great detail and then asked for another show of hands. How many wanted to go to heaven?

Almost all the hands went up. He went at it again, telling them of the punishment or reward that awaited each and every one of them. Surely they wanted the rewards of heaven, not the punishemnt of that other place. "Raise your hands if you want to go to heaven!"

Only one man did not raise his hand. The preacher addressed him directly. "Son, don't you want to go to heaven when you die?"

"Oh," said the man, "when I die, sure. But the way you were talking you were getting up a group to leave right away."

R.A.F.
2012-Mar-19, 03:45 PM
Besides what Swift said about being unable to control what we fear...

I just think this is not true for everyone....it certainly isn't "true" for me.



...why would it make more sense to fear something you can control than something you can't?


Allow me to clarify, "something you can control, but do nothing about". Might sound irrational, but IMO, living in fear of death is irrational.

The Backroad Astronomer
2012-Mar-19, 04:02 PM
What is this death you speak of? :-D

Tog
2012-Mar-19, 04:26 PM
I'm not afraid of dying as much as I am lingering. Also, I don't want to go in any way that the word "consumed" could be applied. No Fires. No coming in second in a battle for position on the food chain. Nothing involving a wasting disease or infection.

I tend to view suicide as a retirement plan for people living week to week. If there is no prospect for the future and no one left to be hurt by the action, the only real consideration is what kind of mess you leave behind.

My boss on the other hand call me every night to lament the fact that one day he'll be gone and no one will remember him. He checks some website that tracks the oldest people on earth to see if he's moved into a top spot. He refuses to do anything that might put his safety at risk, including confronting his wife's Chihuahua if he leaves his bedroom after dark. Personally, I don't see a point in living if that's what life is.

Swift
2012-Mar-19, 04:55 PM
What is this death you speak of? :-D
Or, as Steven Wright says "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly". :D

geonuc
2012-Mar-19, 05:15 PM
Because my father suffered a near-fatal heart attack at age 55, I spent a good portion of that year in my life afraid I was going to die. Not every day, mind you, but often enough.

It is the nothingness that I fear. Also the possibility of a long, bed-ridden, bank-account-draining illness leading eventually to death.

Gillianren
2012-Mar-19, 05:57 PM
I just think this is not true for everyone....it certainly isn't "true" for me.

Count yourself lucky, then. Most humans have at least a few fears that they can't control.

DonM435
2012-Mar-19, 06:12 PM
I plan to avoid death for as long as possible, but after it gets me, I won't be around to complain.

R.A.F.
2012-Mar-19, 06:36 PM
Count yourself lucky, then.

I do...and I know others don't feel the same, but that not my fault.


...and it's not like I've always felt this way. It was a long process of discovery.

Who knows, maybe I'll be terrified when the time comes...I just see no reason to be terrified now. So, yeah, I might be just ignoring the idea of death, but it has "worked" for me for a long time now, and I see no reaons to change. :)

Daffy
2012-Mar-19, 06:47 PM
Being dead doesn't scare me for a variety of reasons. However, the transition certainly does bother me.

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-19, 06:52 PM
When I look at it honestly, I realize that I do fear nonexistence. Yes, it's an irrational fear but seems to be tied up with our egos. I think that's the main reason the thought of an afterlife is so appealing to so many. But my respect for logic and science won't let me adopt that kind of belief.

I'm now at the age where I'm watching my health and vitality begin to ebb but I still control my life. I no longer get mad at myself for things I haven't done. I'm just happy for the things I can still realistically accomplish and for the fact that physical pain is not yet a constant companion.

In some old Twilight Zone episodes, Rod Serling seemed to obsess about people who were in denial of growing old. I found those stories depressing when I was 24 and still do, 50 years later. There was no uplifting aspect to them; they were just sad. I'm happy to have lasted as long as I have after doing so many dangerous things during my life that could have easily ended it and almost did a couple of times. I've always loved life, even when it was difficult, and still do.

Mike

danscope
2012-Mar-19, 07:07 PM
Be of good cheer. Consider so many other creatures who enjoy such a very short life, and then yourselves, who have been granted so much more in every way. You enjoy time and treasures far beyond the wildest dreams of avarice .
We shall be content and appreciate that which is granted.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Mar-19, 10:57 PM
... I tend to view suicide as a retirement plan for people living week to week. If there is no prospect for the future and no one left to be hurt by the action, the only real consideration is what kind of mess you leave behind. ...
I can see taking that option when there are people left behind that are hurt more by not doing so, Alzheimer's, senile dementia and similar are extremely hard on the close ones, often much harder than on the one suffering from it.
Opting out of those in exchange for a dignified end while I'm still capable of tying up lose ends and remembering to whom I want to say my goodbyes seems like a no-brainer.

Gillianren
2012-Mar-19, 11:39 PM
So to speak. But yes, I'm glad that, the last time I saw my grandmother, she was still capable of remembering who I am. That might not have happened, had I seen her a year or so later.

Swift
2012-Mar-20, 01:40 AM
When I look at it honestly, I realize that I do fear nonexistence. Yes, it's an irrational fear but seems to be tied up with our egos. I think that's the main reason the thought of an afterlife is so appealing to so many. But my respect for logic and science won't let me adopt that kind of belief.
Yes and yes. I seem to recall the term "ego death" to describe what you are describing.

mfumbesi
2012-Mar-20, 08:36 AM
I settled the fear death thing with myself when I was a teenager.
My conclusion was it will happen, I hoped all my close relations will find some peace (and recently with kids and all.... financial peace also).
All is just a free trip around the sun. All this talk about death and achieving your goal reminds me of: "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozymandias)

Buttercup
2012-Mar-20, 01:25 PM
Originally Posted by Luckmeister
When I look at it honestly, I realize that I do fear nonexistence. Yes, it's an irrational fear but seems to be tied up with our egos. I think that's the main reason the thought of an afterlife is so appealing to so many. But my respect for logic and science won't let me adopt that kind of belief


Yes and yes. I seem to recall the term "ego death" to describe what you are describing.

Another good reason to read Carl Jung. The ego is only part of the overall Self. Actually the ego's proper place is as a satellite to the Self; as if ego were Earth and Self the sun. The Self meaning wholeness; emotional and psychological health.

When individuation (maturation of the Self) is achieved the ego is in its proper place as *satellite*, and the Self doesn't fear death.

Argos
2012-Mar-20, 04:01 PM
Im not afraid of dying. I just regret not being here when the cool stuff happens [Fusion, Mars colonization, the cure of cancer, the first ET message and so on]. The current times are boring.

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-20, 05:26 PM
Im not afraid of dying. I just regret not being here when the cool stuff happens [Fusion, Mars colonization, the cure of cancer, the first ET message and so on]. The current times are boring.

I get your point. I frequently lament that I may not be here when certain scientific breakthroughs happen.

But current times boring? That depends on what you're into. To people working in nanotech, genome or robotics fields, this is hardly a boring time, whereas for manned-space enthusiasts, we're in a frustrating lull. Overall, I think as many groundbreaking discoveries are in process now as most times in the past, and with today's efficiency of communications, we are more aware of them as they happen than people were in the past.

If we are bored by not receiving the first ET message, we may be bored for a long long time.:lol:

kevin1981
2012-Mar-20, 05:41 PM
I have thought about this too. I would love to see how the future will develop and i wonder what the world will be like in 500 years time.
It is frustrating to know i will not see any of this !

Argos
2012-Mar-20, 05:43 PM
Luckmeister, that was partly tongue-in-cheek. :)

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-20, 05:53 PM
Luckmeister, that was partly tongue-in-cheek. :)

Yeah I kinda figured that. We need a good TIC smiley. The wink or roll-eyes don't quite cut it.

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-20, 06:02 PM
I have thought about this too. I would love to see how the future will develop and i wonder what the world will be like in 500 years time.
It is frustrating to know i will not see any of this !

Just adopt a religion that believes in reincarnation and that won't be a problem (insert proposed tongue-in-cheek smiley here).

Trebuchet
2012-Mar-20, 06:06 PM
Im not afraid of dying. I just regret not being here when the cool stuff happens [Fusion, Mars colonization, the cure of cancer, the first ET message and so on]. The current times are boring.

Me too. But I'm glad I was here, watching, when (a) man first took one small step on the moon. I'd like to think that in the 25th century, if we make it that long, that'll be pretty much the only event from the 20th to be remembered.

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-20, 06:13 PM
Me too. But I'm glad I was here, watching, when (a) man first took one small step on the moon. I'd like to think that in the 25th century, if we make it that long, that'll be pretty much the only event from the 20th to be remembered.

Nope, they're bound to remember your pumpkin being the first to reach one mile. :)

ETA: Oh wait -- that'll be the 21st century.

Chuck
2012-Mar-20, 06:25 PM
Just adopt a religion that believes in reincarnation and that won't be a problem (insert proposed tongue-in-cheek smiley here).
Good idea, plus I'll have myself frozen as a backup. Of course, both might work resulting in legal problems later.

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-20, 06:31 PM
Good idea, plus I'll have myself frozen as a backup. Of course, both might work resulting in legal problems later.

Just remember to will all your possessions to yourself.

Argos
2012-Mar-20, 07:06 PM
Theres just gotta be a 'like' button here, hehe.

BigDon
2012-Mar-20, 07:16 PM
About 18 years ago my liver crashed hard over the course of three days and I really thought I was on the the exit ramp of the Highway of Life. Never really got the illusion of immortality back quite the same way. And the two times I was mistakinly diagnosed with a terminal condition, which wasn't counter diagnosed for weeks, if not months later, I got really calm after an intial two or three days of angst.

On the other hand, and I never knew this until it happened, I'm the kind of man who'll curse you until the air is blue if you stick a loaded .45 Bisley in my face. Of course I was already mad at him and he probably did the right thing as I was about to descend upon him like the Wrath of God. (The coward!) Shoot, I was still going for him but I had three big movers holding me back, one on each arm and one around my neck, because they saw the trouble coming.

I'm getting mad just thinking about it again.

Torsten
2012-Mar-20, 07:25 PM
I'm not afraid of death, but I have a concern, or even a fear, of the method.

I've had to assess the hazards in how I make my living, and I really do not want to be killed by any of the following:
Traffic accident,
Mauling by bear or cougar,
Impaled by stumbling and falling onto a hard, dry, pointy limb,
Drowning by falling into raging stream,
Being struck by a falling tree (windy today, and thus I stayed at home).

Every day when I go to the field I think about what might go wrong and prevent me from getting home safely.

And I'd be really angry if I were diagnosed with a terminal disease at this point in my life.

Buttercup
2012-Mar-20, 07:40 PM
I'm not afraid of death, but I have a concern, or even a fear, of the method...
And I'd be really angry if I were diagnosed with a terminal disease at this point in my life.

I have two distinct fears of how I'd go, but don't want to even list them. :(

I'm thinking of the teenager in Florida who was recently shot and killed by a stupid and over-zealous "neighborhood watch" idiot. That's an unspeakable tragedy, senseless and so stupid...and it's "always someone else" the victim. But it could be you or me. :(

When I do kick the bucket, I hope it's via (quick/relatively painless) natural cause or (quick/painless) accident. For someone else to get all judgmental and decide I deserve to die because they're stupid or bigoted/whatever...that makes me angry, just thinking of it. We like to think we're so in control of our lives; well that might be arbitrarily "given" to someone else. :(

BigDon
2012-Mar-20, 07:41 PM
Torsten, I honestly think you would persevere over a cougar.

In California we don't hunt them and the cougars forgot why they should be afraid of us. Now they eat one or two old ladies on bird watching hikes every year or so. Point Reyes and Monterey and Santa Cruz counties.

This concerns me so I read the reports.

On the other hand I'm assuming you're a male of at least 200 pounds...

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-20, 08:13 PM
Theres just gotta be a 'like' button here, hehe.

Ask and ye shall receive. Just click on the link.

LIKE (http://home.comcast.net/~mcluster/fb.jpg)

Trebuchet
2012-Mar-20, 08:54 PM
I'm not afraid of death, but I have a concern, or even a fear, of the method.

I've had to assess the hazards in how I make my living, and I really do not want to be killed by any of the following:
Traffic accident,
Mauling by bear or cougar,
Impaled by stumbling and falling onto a hard, dry, pointy limb,
Drowning by falling into raging stream,
Being struck by a falling tree (windy today, and thus I stayed at home).

Every day when I go to the field I think about what might go wrong and prevent me from getting home safely.

And I'd be really angry if I were diagnosed with a terminal disease at this point in my life.

To me, almost any of those would be better than lingering for a long time in a near-vegetative state, in pain, and with nothing you can do about it.

Chuck
2012-Mar-20, 08:55 PM
Oops, wrong thread.

Torsten
2012-Mar-20, 09:05 PM
I'm thinking of the teenager in Florida who was recently shot and killed by a stupid and over-zealous "neighborhood watch" idiot. That's an unspeakable tragedy, senseless and so stupid...and it's "always someone else" the victim. But it could be you or me.

"Carrying a bag of Skittles and an ice tea." Could have been anyone's kid. Senseless and stupid, for sure, and very difficult to remain calm upon hearing that.


Torsten, I honestly think you would persevere over a cougar.

You're probably right. I've read a few reports of people being attacked and chasing off the cat, and in one case of an older man killing the animal with a knife. I just imagine it somehow going wrong, but I'm sure I wouldn't go down without a fight unless it came out of a tree and got me down first. But the bigger hazard for me in this part of the world are bear encounters.


On the other hand I'm assuming you're a male of at least 200 pounds...

Yep, back to a few pounds either side of it. Managed to trim off 25 pounds in the last year, mostly by reducing portions and cutting out snacks in the evening.

Torsten
2012-Mar-20, 09:14 PM
To me, almost any of those would be better than lingering for a long time in a near-vegetative state, in pain, and with nothing you can do about it.

One of the reasons I'd be angry of the terminal illness: the thought of it ending that way.

I think part of the reason for the workplace hazards being on that list is that they stem from the effort to make a living (most of my driving is work related).

BigDon
2012-Mar-20, 10:59 PM
Yep, back to a few pounds either side of it. Managed to trim off 25 pounds in the last year, mostly by reducing portions and cutting out snacks in the evening.

You can never tell. :)

I've met quite a few female foresters in my day who were perfectly snack sized.

For cougars, that is. (Myself, I haven't eaten anybody in over ten years.)


On the other hand, how is it I wouldn't have nearly the same level of confedence in a leopard encounter? Leopards only average a little heavier than cougars but are a whole other smoke.

John Mendenhall
2012-Mar-21, 12:46 AM
My apologies, I've said this before. We will probably all die. But our children may not. And our children's children almost certainly will not.

Keep up that medical research. And population control. And nuclear non-proliferation. And go for extra terrestial colonies.

If we can leave this legacy, I fear not.

Trebuchet
2012-Mar-21, 12:48 AM
I'm from Montana. What is this "cougar" of which you speak? Is it anything like a mountain lion?

R.A.F.
2012-Mar-21, 02:08 AM
We will probably all die.

Probably????


But our children may not. And our children's children almost certainly will not.

The only reason immortality appeals to people is because of the existance of death...

R.A.F.
2012-Mar-21, 02:13 AM
I just regret not being here when the cool stuff happens [Fusion, Mars colonization, the cure of cancer, the first ET message and so on].

That is only one "side of the coin". There will be lots of un-cool stuff happening too, and I don't regret missing any of that.

Jim
2012-Mar-21, 02:30 AM
One of the reasons I'd be angry of the terminal illness: the thought of it ending that way.

Prostate cancer. It usually hits older men, and most of them die from other causes.

I used to have this fantasy that at the age of 95 I would be shot to death by the jealous husband of a 20-yo. By mistake.

Luckmeister
2012-Mar-21, 03:55 AM
Prostate cancer. It usually hits older men, and most of them die from other causes.

I used to have this fantasy that at the age of 95 I would be shot to death by the jealous husband of a 20-yo. By mistake.

A lingering painful death can result from a gunshot wound. I'd prefer a grand piano dropped from 10 stories up where all I'd experience is the beginning of a very discordant crescendo.

Gillianren
2012-Mar-21, 04:16 AM
My apologies, I've said this before. We will probably all die. But our children may not. And our children's children almost certainly will not.

I really don't think this is true. In fact, I really don't think this is possible.

danscope
2012-Mar-21, 05:45 AM
Why worry about our passing. Life truly is a gift we shall appreciate , share and when it is time, we shall step aside
as others press on. Our grace in living will be a remembrance to those after us. It is enough and we shall be content.

It is the way of things.

tnjrp
2012-Mar-21, 06:35 AM
I really don't think this is true. In fact, I really don't think this is possible.Indeed as I often say, in this universe much given to entropy, dark energy and whathavewe true immortality is (almost) certainly just a pipedream.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Mar-21, 07:14 AM
My apologies, I've said this before. We will probably all die. But our children may not. And our children's children almost certainly will not.
Keep up that medical research.
You're not been keeping up with medical research if that's what you think. The low hanging fruit's been picked and the rate of new successful drugs have been dropping steadily for the last half century, with the total cost for developing each rising steadily as well.

ETA: Counting money used on researching drugs that fail, which is necessary to get the true cost of finding a new successful drug, the prize is on average 8 billion dollars and rising. Fast.

If this goes on, your grand children may live forever, but with dementia which is still untreatable.

danscope
2012-Mar-21, 06:13 PM
Do we wonder at the costs of drugs ....what with the extraordinary amount of totaly useless advertising on television and radio and magazines. I surmise that it just lines the pockets of some people at our severe expense.

R.A.F.
2012-Mar-21, 06:24 PM
...your grand children may live forever, but with dementia which is still untreatable.

That would be a living hell I most definitely would fear.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Mar-21, 06:32 PM
Do we wonder at the costs of drugs ....what with the extraordinary amount of totaly useless advertising on television and radio and magazines. I surmise that it just lines the pockets of some people at our severe expense.
That's the cost of research including trials, not of marketing.

megrfl
2012-Mar-22, 07:14 AM
Tuesday, March 20, 2012 was my Dad's 69th birthday! Tuesday, March 20, 2012 his 97 yr. old mother died.

Spring - birth - death. In a way, it is lovely, in a way, it is not.


I've been so sick, that I've wanted to die. I've been so happy/healthy, that I never wanted to die. Things change rapidly.

I know that when I am dying, literally dying, I'll want to die.

For now, I'm trying, that's all I can do.



"Death is but a door. Time is but a window. I'll be back." ~ Ghostbusters II

mfumbesi
2012-Mar-22, 09:11 AM
......
I used to have this fantasy that at the age of 95 I would be shot to death by the jealous husband of a 20-yo. By mistake.
You, me and half of the male population share this fantasy.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Mar-22, 01:51 PM
Except in my fantasy it's not by mistake. :D

SeanF
2012-Mar-22, 02:11 PM
You, me and half of the male population share this fantasy.
Only half? :)

Argos
2012-Mar-22, 04:30 PM
Ask and ye shall receive. Just click on the link.

LIKE (http://home.comcast.net/~mcluster/fb.jpg)

Cool, hehe. :)

Argos
2012-Mar-22, 04:32 PM
That is only one "side of the coin". There will be lots of un-cool stuff happening too, and I don't regret missing any of that.

Well, yeah, you have a point.

Swift
2012-Mar-22, 06:17 PM
A little bit of a derail...

Since this thread started, I've had a tickle in my brain about some appropriate quote having to do with busy living and busy dying, but I couldn't put it together. I finally did, from The Shawshank Redemption:


Andy Dufresne: Get busy living, or get busy dying.

Tog
2012-Mar-22, 06:23 PM
I think it was actually Red that said it first.

mike alexander
2012-Mar-22, 07:31 PM
I thought Red said, "Keep your stick on the ice."

LaurelHS
2012-Mar-22, 07:44 PM
Quando omni flunkus moritati.

Gillianren
2012-Mar-22, 07:48 PM
I think it was actually Red that said it first.

Yup. And then Andy repeated it after [major event in the story] to let him know that he was moving on with his life.

danscope
2012-Mar-22, 09:41 PM
Borrowed and inspired by Bob Dylan .... " It's alright, Ma " .

" He that's not busy being born is busy dying. "

swampyankee
2012-Mar-24, 02:34 AM
Only half? :)

The other half is doing the shooting.

DonM435
2012-Mar-24, 03:40 PM
"Die? That is the last thing I shall do!"

SkepticJ
2012-Mar-25, 04:49 AM
I really don't think this is true. In fact, I really don't think this is possible.

"Forever and ever" immortality, maybe not*. But this universe is, so far as we know, going to last forever--though eventually it'll be matter-less and with a locally uniform distribution of photons. For many billions of trillions of years, for as long as there are energy gradients and matter to make things with, life can exist.

*I'm not brave enough to say impossible. Theoretical physics suggests that it's possible to create other universes using particle accelerators. If it's possible to not only do this, but somehow transfer information from our universe down into them, and repeat the process in the new universe, over and over again, down, down, down, forever, then what is this, but immortality? This may not be possible, but it's way too early to dismiss it. We simply don't know.

As to the OP: no, not really. There was a time before I existed, and there will be a time after I'm gone. What's so scary about that? I'd like to live forever, being alive is pretty cool, but I may have been born too early for this. If so, when the Grim Reaper comes, I'll kindly salute him with my middle finger and cease metabolic processes.

profloater
2012-Mar-25, 04:20 PM
As Woody said, I have no trouble about Dying I just don't don't want to be there when it happens.
However it does now colour my thoughts a lot of the time but I find not in a depressing way, it's more about the bucket list and trying to keep in contact with friends, not assuming they will always be there. Some of them are not there.

Inclusa
2012-Mar-26, 04:25 AM
Probably I will refuse to commend YET; of course we can challenge aging, not to extend life span, but to promote quality of life.
I would say: To do researches on both regeneration medicines and body mechanics; if one day the mechanical body is superior to the biological body both in durability and functions, keeping the biological body seems beyond the point.

Gillianren
2012-Mar-26, 04:40 AM
I went to a funeral today. The memorial service for an old teacher. If I can inspire half the wonderful memories Dave Hitchens did, that's enough.

P Timmy
2012-Mar-26, 06:12 AM
Yes, I am extremely afraid of death; it is almost certainly my single greatest fear. It is the no-longer-existing that scares me the most. I have spent untold nights awake about it since I was in my early teens.

What do you imagine the worst thing about "no-longer-existing" could be.???

profloater
2012-Mar-26, 01:06 PM
I agree it is hard to properly imagine the "completeness" of no longer existing even though sleep comes very close so we do get to know the absence of feeling etc. And while it is easy to talk about it, coming to terms is hard work. The wish for continuation underlies so many superstitions and religions which turn the fear of death into life dogmas. Surely the best plan is to be clear about what you want to do while you can.

Noclevername
2012-Mar-26, 02:55 PM
Dying is the thing I am most afraid of. In a sense it's the only thing I'm afraid of. I've endured physical and emotional pain and mental illness, but when I started having suicidal urges it was the most frightening time in my life.

Death has taken away far too many friends, relatives and loved ones, and it's always there waiting for me and everyone else I know. I hate it and I wish it would go away.

cran
2012-Mar-26, 03:54 PM
I can echo much of what has been said here already. Having come close to dying (the old "clinically dead" call) three times in my 50 plus years, I believe I can face the inevitable without fear - preferably, without pain.

My father died on December 31, 2011, peacefully and in the end willingly because his quality of life had deteriorated to complete dependence upon machines and nursing staff.

My mother died on March 10, 2012 - I've just returned home from the funeral and sorting out her personal effects. In her last conversation with me, only hours before the end, she said, "I am afraid of dying, but I do not want to continue living like this." She died in the same way, and from the same body-wasting cancer, as my Dad.

I hope to remember them as they were - when life filled them and laughter a part of their daily routine, and death was little more than an intellectual exercise; something we all knew was coming, but which was not yet on the horizon.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2012-Mar-29, 02:15 PM
yes and no....curious about what comes after though....hopefully I'll get a do-over...

tnjrp
2012-Mar-30, 04:21 AM
There is nothing wrong with dying per se. It's just that you'll be stiff as heck the next morning.

blueshift
2012-Mar-30, 03:47 PM
When I sleep or pass out I cannot make measurement. That is why I set the alarm in the waking life. I don't set some alarm in my dream because I cannot perceive time in a dream. When I die time will not exist again and will not permanently. When I was quite young I was more puzzled by what things felt like before I was born. Uncles and aunts would gather and discuss what happened 30 years prior and I would get a sinking feeling, wondering "How come I can't remember 30 years before my birth? I have only been in this place for 6 years so why can't I remember those other 24 years? They sure outnumber the 6, don't they?" Then I went to history class when I was older and really wondered where all that missing duration's events went. So the after life doesn't bring anywhere near a puzzle to me as the prior life does.

My fear of dying is the abandoning of my autistic son. He is 39 years old and lives with me and will not go on any travels anywhere without me, despite being high functioning. I have been very lucky to have such wonderful company.