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View Full Version : Dutch scientists mapped enormous impact craters...



kucharek
2004-Aug-20, 06:44 PM
...under Antarctic ice sheet.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3580230.stm


The craters may have either come from an asteroid between 5 and 11km across that broke up in the atmosphere, a swarm of comets or comet fragments.
...
Professor Frans van der Hoeven, from Delft University in the Netherlands, told the International Geographical Union Congress in Glasgow that the biggest single strike seared a hole in the ice sheet roughly 322km (200 miles) by 322km.

Squink
2004-Aug-20, 06:54 PM
The strike took place only 780,000 years ago! If it had hit elsewhere we could've all been killed.

Donnie B.
2004-Aug-20, 07:00 PM
The strike took place only 780,000 years ago! If it had hit elsewhere we could've all been killed.
Maybe we were.

George
2004-Aug-20, 09:13 PM
Hmmm....The approximate date of Yellowstone's eruption was around 630,000 years ago.

aurora
2004-Aug-20, 10:18 PM
Hmmm....The approximate date of Yellowstone's eruption was around 630,000 years ago.

However, Yellowstone is on top of a hot spot that has migrated from eastern Washington, across southern Idaho, to its current location (or should say that North America has drifted across the location of the hot spot).

So if you were implying that this discovered impact in in Antartica caused the Yellowstone hot spot, then I wouild say the dates don't match up.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2004-Aug-21, 12:22 AM
Hmmm....The approximate date of Yellowstone's eruption was around 630,000 years ago.

Yeah

There is some question whether Impacts can Trigger Volcanic Eruptions, like what happened on Callisto and Mercury.

The Earth is probably Too Big, but Chixilub and The Deccan Traps, are Far Too Close, in Age, to keep from Bolstering the Theory.

George
2004-Aug-21, 04:10 AM
Another point is the apparent regularity of the eruptions. About every 600,000 years. If the impacts in the antarctic were to have similar regularity, well, maybe there's a connection.

The comets would seem to be in a peculiar orbital inclination and would have to be large in number. Is it reasonable to say they would continue to hit around the antartic region due to the limited range of the precesion of the equinox if such a group of comets existed?

You see how easy it is to come up with a cute little crackpot theory. :) This one may be worth some study, however.

Thanks aurora, I assumed most the U.S. plate was headed west. I am not familiar with current plate tectonic theory. I understand there are about 8 or 10 large and about 20 smaller ones.

I would assume impacts would send tremendous hydraulic shock waves which create nodes of great and weak intensity at various crust locations.

George
2004-Aug-21, 04:15 AM
BTW, what would you call a group of comets. A swarm, a flock, a herd, a bunch?

[Edit: the article did say "swarm", so, this might be official. I dunno?]

George
2004-Aug-21, 04:36 AM
Of course, it took no effort to find someone has already cracked the pot....
here (http://www.barry.warmkessel.com/barry/YELLOWSTONE.html)
Verbose and fun for any Vulcan-ologist. Planet X is in there a little, too. :roll:

milli360
2004-Aug-21, 04:49 AM
Another point is the apparent regularity of the eruptions. About every 600,000 years.
700,000 years. And there were three, so we're only talking about two periods of approximately the same length. A regular old faithful. :)

Maksutov
2004-Aug-21, 07:38 AM
Of course, it took no effort to find someone has already cracked the pot....
here (http://www.barry.warmkessel.com/barry/YELLOWSTONE.html)
Verbose and fun for any Vulcan-ologist. Planet X is in there a little, too. :roll:

Definitely woo with a capital "W" ("It's tha big Dubbya, I tell ya!").

I suspect the whole article is some kind of put on or send up, considering, for example, the first author's name is "Warmkessel" (the English translation is obvious), and this is a "study" of Yellowstone blowing off steam. :lol:

George
2004-Aug-23, 03:58 PM
Another point is the apparent regularity of the eruptions. About every 600,000 years.
700,000 years. And there were three, so we're only talking about two periods of approximately the same length. A regular old faithful. :)
Thanks for that correction. I used Bill Bryson's information (Short History of Nearly Everything). Even his time periods are a little short. :)

I am also pleased to hear 700,000 years since the last one was, supposedly, 630,000 years ago, albeit, only 250x Mt. St. Helen's energy. :o

milli360
2004-Aug-23, 05:14 PM
George:
Thanks for that correction. I used Bill Bryson's information (Short History of Nearly Everything).
Yeah, I finisihed Bryson's book a couple months ago. I found many basic errors--and I'm so sure that there are more that I didn't catch, I wouldn't use his book as a primary source.

Brady Yoon
2004-Aug-23, 06:08 PM
Maybe we were.

What's that mean? :o Wouldn't Antarctica be a relatively safe place for asteroids to hit?

George
2004-Aug-23, 06:25 PM
George:
Thanks for that correction. I used Bill Bryson's information (Short History of Nearly Everything).
Yeah, I finisihed Bryson's book a couple months ago. I found many basic errors--and I'm so sure that there are more that I didn't catch, I wouldn't use his book as a primary source.
[I posted many of his errors in the BAD TV,etc. forum]. I still like his work. It would be better if some articulate astronomer did a cd set (hint). :)

milli360
2004-Aug-23, 06:48 PM
George
[I posted many of his errors in the BAD TV,etc. forum].
Found 'em (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=313974#313974), from a couple weeks ago, but it doesn't look like you're close to listing all the errors. :)

But, as I told soup (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=294618#294618), I don't think I wasted the time that I spent reading the book.

Dutch Knowledge
2008-Nov-07, 09:56 PM
However, Yellowstone is on top of a hot spot that has migrated from eastern Washington, across southern Idaho, to its current location (or should say that North America has drifted across the location of the hot spot).

So if you were implying that this discovered impact in in Antartica caused the Yellowstone hot spot, then I wouild say the dates don't match up.


I would say that, considering the idea of latitude around 45 degrees being a candidate of a perfect 'expression' on the Hyper Dimensional Cube latitude, Mount St helens to be replaced by yellowstone would a potential candidate ( with offshore Hokaido as second best), 'overdue' by now and reverse continental drift would pinpoint at Yellowstone. ( getting momentum from far below the surface, already off spot at surface level. I would say timing at Hyper Dimensional Cube, location at HD cube spot( around November 17, 2010, Yellowstone).keep it in mind, I will make sure you won't miss it

Swift
2008-Nov-07, 10:19 PM
Hi Dutch Knowledge, welcome to BAUT.

Uh... "Hyper Dimensional Cube latitude"???? What does that mean?

ToSeek
2008-Nov-07, 11:19 PM
Dutch Knowledge has been banned as a sock puppet of Dutch.

sabianq
2008-Nov-08, 01:25 AM
Yeah

There is some question whether Impacts can Trigger Volcanic Eruptions, like what happened on Callisto and Mercury.

The Earth is probably Too Big, but Chixilub and The Deccan Traps, are Far Too Close, in Age, to keep from Bolstering the Theory.

and Mars too?
does this data show that Tharsis volcanoes Ascraeus Mons, Pavonis Mons, Arsia Mons and Olympus Mons "H" may have been created by the impact that created Hellas Impact Crater "L" ?

http://geology.com/articles/mars/map-of-mars.jpg

See the martian crustal dichotomy..

http://today.caltech.edu/today/story-display?story_id=30142
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2007/pdf/2209.pdf
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2008/pdf/1980.pdf