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Swift
2012-Apr-11, 09:00 PM
From R&D magazine on-line (http://www.rdmag.com/News/2012/04/Information-Tech-Communications-First-message-transmitted-via-neutrinos/)

A science fiction dream come true, but not quite ready for your cell phone

Scientists have for decades contemplated communicating via neutrinos when other methods won’t do. For the first time, physicists and engineers have successfully transmitted a message through 240 m of rock using these ghost-like particles.

...

He collaborated with scientists of the MINERvA collaboration at DOE’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, who use a 170-ton particle detector and a powerful, pulsed accelerator beam to produce neutrinos and measure their interactions with matter. Based on Stancil’s proposal, scientists were able to manipulate the pulsed beam and turn it for a couple of hours into a neutrino telegraph. “It’s impressive that the accelerator is flexible enough to do this,” said Fermilab physicist Debbie Harris, co-spokesperson of the MINERvA experiment.

For the actual test, scientists transmitted the word “neutrino.” The MINERvA detector decoded the message at 99 percent accuracy after just two repetitions of the signal.

Tensor
2012-Apr-11, 09:08 PM
A science fiction dream come true, but not quite ready for your cell phone


....who use a 170-ton particle detector and a powerful, pulsed accelerator beam to produce neutrinos and measure their interactions with matter.

Yeah, it just misses fitting into the back pocket of my jeans.

Trebuchet
2012-Apr-12, 01:16 AM
But did it get there faster than light?

Jens
2012-Apr-12, 02:00 AM
But did it get there faster than light?

They were a bit late in publishing it. The answer arrived in 1913.

Also, I wonder how you can read the word "neutrino" with "99% accuracy." It's only got 8 letters in it, so missing one letter would be like 89% accuracy. Maybe it forgot to dot the "i"?

Romanus
2012-Apr-12, 08:51 AM
^
LOL, true. Maybe the original article really meant that the signal was good overall to a 99% confidence level.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Apr-12, 12:43 PM
They were a bit late in publishing it. The answer arrived in 1913.

Also, I wonder how you can read the word "neutrino" with "99% accuracy." It's only got 8 letters in it, so missing one letter would be like 89% accuracy. Maybe it forgot to dot the "i"?
8*8=64 bits, plus error correction bits to compensate for a very noisy signal can easily get to 100 bits. if they got one wrong, but it was corrected, then you'd have 99% accuracy..

Squink
2012-Apr-12, 02:14 PM
Also, I wonder how you can read the word "neutrino" with "99% accuracy." It's only got 8 letters in it, so missing one letter would be like 89% accuracy.Likely they encoded message in ASCII or some such. Send twice at 64 bits per sending and missing one bit will take things down to 99% accuracy.
There's no mention of baud rate in the article. I expect my 80's vintage 300bps modem was faster.

publiusr
2012-Apr-13, 07:20 PM
Well, I hope the thing stays huge. If this could be shrunk down--there goes the launch vehicle market right there.

SkepticJ
2012-Apr-13, 11:24 PM
No it wouldn't, because there'd still be a need for weather and other science satellites, spy satellites, space probe launches, and people would still want to colonize space.

Don't Farnsworth–Hirsch fusors give off neutrinos as well as neutrons? They can be made significantly smaller than 170 tonnes, more like tabletop size.