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pghnative
2004-Aug-30, 04:50 PM
Has anyone seen this?

http://www.news10.net/storyfull1.asp?id=7864

Seems to be a hoax, but I suppose it could be an actual meteorite with the observations ("When we saw it at 5:30 or so, the smoke was still coming out of this one,") exaggerated to make the story sound more interesting.

George
2004-Aug-30, 05:12 PM
Has anyone seen this?

http://www.news10.net/storyfull1.asp?id=7864

Seems to be a hoax, but I suppose it could be an actual meteorite with the observations ("When we saw it at 5:30 or so, the smoke was still coming out of this one,") exaggerated to make the story sound more interesting.


The biggest piece weighs 137 grams, or about 4.5 ounces, and is the sizeof a grapefruit.
That seems to be about .37g/cc which puts it in a special class of objects - "fesites". The common term is - "cow patties". :wink: :) I assumed an average diameter of 3.5 inches based on a hand size and amount of hair on the arm. :)

Pumice might have this density. Any volcanoes noted recently in the California area? :)

Most meteroites range in density from 2 g/cc to 4 g/cc.

Hopefully, someone less clownish can handle this question better.

R.A.F.
2004-Aug-30, 05:40 PM
It "arrived" monday night. The next afternoon it was "hot and smoking"????

I would say that's a pretty good indication that what they have is not a meteorite. Though I agree with George, that part could just be exaggeration.

It sounds like someone's Bar-B-Q exploded. :)

Jerry
2004-Aug-30, 05:50 PM
Has anyone seen this?

http://www.news10.net/storyfull1.asp?id=7864

Seems to be a hoax, but I suppose it could be an actual meteorite with the observations ("When we saw it at 5:30 or so, the smoke was still coming out of this one,") exaggerated to make the story sound more interesting.The density is very odd. I'll vote for space debris.

George
2004-Aug-30, 08:39 PM
It "arrived" monday night. The next afternoon it was "hot and smoking"????
Maybe grass would smolder but not the rock. Their grass looks way too green to smolder. Also, the area does not look charred as from fire. The roots and grass tips don't look right for having been burned.

George
2004-Aug-30, 08:49 PM
There is a video clip link at the bottom of the article. It made tv news.

They show surprising optimism it is from Mars. :-?

George
2004-Aug-30, 09:07 PM
Hmmmm...Turlock isn't too far from Sonoma State where some astronomer resides, I think. :)

Swift
2004-Aug-30, 09:12 PM
Has anyone seen this?

http://www.news10.net/storyfull1.asp?id=7864

Seems to be a hoax, but I suppose it could be an actual meteorite with the observations ("When we saw it at 5:30 or so, the smoke was still coming out of this one,") exaggerated to make the story sound more interesting.


The biggest piece weighs 137 grams, or about 4.5 ounces, and is the sizeof a grapefruit.
That seems to be about .37g/cc which puts it in a special class of objects - "fesites". The common term is - "cow patties". :wink: :) I assumed an average diameter of 3.5 inches based on a hand size and amount of hair on the arm. :)

Pumice might have this density. Any volcanoes noted recently in the California area? :)

Most meteroites range in density from 2 g/cc to 4 g/cc.

Hopefully, someone less clownish can handle this question better.
Looking at the photo I don't think it is a sphere 3.5 inches in diameter. It doesn't look round, more potatoe shaped, and it might not be rounded around the backside. So maybe that puts the density more in the 0.7-0.8 g/cc range - but that is still very light!

crazy4space
2004-Aug-30, 09:14 PM
It sounds like someone's Bar-B-Q exploded. :)[/quote]

I love the last line - How often do you find an ASTEROID in your back yard? ASTEROID :o

George
2004-Aug-30, 09:53 PM
Looking at the photo I don't think it is a sphere 3.5 inches in diameter. It doesn't look round, more potatoe shaped, and it might not be rounded around the backside. So maybe that puts the density more in the 0.7-0.8 g/cc range - but that is still very light!
I like your numbers a little better. I looked at the News 10 video clip and a 3.5" sphere may be too large in comparison. It doesn't look very flat, however, so I will guess .5 to .8 g/cc. Interestingly, this is in the range of pumice.

The recipients are taking it well calling it magical and a miracle. Assuming it was a meteor, glad they aren't having to patch their roof. :)

George
2004-Aug-30, 09:56 PM
The news reporter on the video clip said the rock is at Lawrence Livermore but they can not confirm whether it is a meteorite until a scientist inspects it.

The Bad Astronomer
2004-Aug-30, 10:17 PM
It doesn't look like a meteorite to me. But these thigns are very, very rarely meteorites. They are usually meteorwrongs (http://home.earthlink.net/~magellon/wrongs1.html).

The Bad Astronomer
2004-Aug-30, 10:33 PM
By the way, I talked to the reporter on the phone. He said he'll let me know if/when he finds out anything more on the analysis.

George
2004-Aug-30, 10:39 PM
By the way, I talked to the reporter on the phone. He said he'll let me know if/when he finds out anything more on the analysis.
8) . Surely they have the weight wrong. A meteorite that floats?

Your link was great as I was not aware of the streak test for iron and hematite.

pghnative
2004-Aug-31, 11:37 AM
Your link was great as I was not aware of the streak test for iron and hematite.


The couple's nephew did a little investigating on the Internet and believes the rock has characteristics in common with ones from Mars.

I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that the nephew, despite the internet search, isn't aware of the streak test either. :D Especially since the tests don't indicate planet of origin!

John Kierein
2004-Aug-31, 11:45 AM
I grew up in the midwest. We would go to Lake Michigan and pick up "meteorites" on the shore that would float ashore. I know they were meteorites because my mother said they were and she grew up in Manistee and spent a lot of time on the shores of Lake Michigan. They looked suspiciously like coal cinders to me.

Moose
2004-Aug-31, 12:01 PM
"Still felt hot" the next day?

Aren't meteors cool to the touch by the time they hit the ground (and certainly after 12 hours of radiating any excess heat they might still be retaining from entry?)

George
2004-Aug-31, 12:28 PM
"Still felt hot" the next day?

Aren't meteors cool to the touch by the time they hit the ground (and certainly after 12 hours of radiating any excess heat they might still be retaining from entry?)
Two family members used the terms "miracle" and "magic" to describe the fortuitous event happening in their back yard. These terms might also be applied to the surprising heat.

Apparently, the fire department rendered the threat harmless.

We still don't have a scenario to explain the event. There is a teenager involved...hmmm....I wonder if all their local wheat fields already have crop circles and....? :)

Wally
2004-Aug-31, 01:07 PM
Hmmm. Looked like "dog droppings". Felt "hot to the touch". Weighs less that one would expect for a stone of its size?

. . . anyone happen to notice a great dane trotting away from the scene???

8-[

Captain Kidd
2004-Aug-31, 02:05 PM
Or look up and see if there's any planes flying overhead.

"It's the peanut that gives it away."
"That's a space peanut."

Sorry, caught the meterorite scene in Joe Dirt couple days ago. 8-[

[Edited about a thousand times. :x ]

beskeptical
2004-Sep-01, 05:28 AM
...Maybe grass would smolder but not the rock...Not from the meteorite. A newly fallen meteorite can be warm to the touch but that is as hot as it gets once it is on the ground.

pghnative
2004-Sep-01, 05:36 PM
A few more details are in this article.

http://www.turlockjournal.com/news/newsview.asp?c=120427

A couple strange quotes, including:


... Then I had family friend who works at Lawrence Livermore Lab take a look at it ...
“The man from the lab said the pigment on the stone is referred to as blueberries so that’s what leads us to believe that it is from Mars,”

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe the Mars "blueberries" are called that due to pigmentation, but rather due to their shape.

George
2004-Sep-01, 06:05 PM
A few more details are in this article.

http://www.turlockjournal.com/news/newsview.asp?c=120427

A couple strange quotes, including:


... Then I had family friend who works at Lawrence Livermore Lab take a look at it ...
“The man from the lab said the pigment on the stone is referred to as blueberries so that’s what leads us to believe that it is from Mars,”

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe the Mars "blueberries" are called that due to pigmentation, but rather due to their shape.
Yes. All blueberries are from Mars. Had some Martian cereal just yesterday

George
2004-Sep-01, 06:37 PM
...Maybe grass would smolder but not the rock...Not from the meteorite. A newly fallen meteorite can be warm to the touch but that is as hot as it gets once it is on the ground.


It is not that heavy at all and it smells like sulfur,” she said.
Hmmmm....Mars is known for sulphur content. It would help explain the smoldering.....nahhhhh, what are the odds. Ya reckon Beagle 2 hit with more bite than bark? :)

[Edit...on that note...someone did mention dog droppings.... :lol: ]