PDA

View Full Version : how many ways are there to be 'intelligent'?



plant
2012-Apr-23, 06:31 AM
I'm thinking that our robots/cylons (not meat) will eventually colonise all of space ... presumably vast distances wouldn't matter if you could switch your brain off or slow it down for 100,000,000 years... you'd wake up and be at the other side of the galaxy.

I'm wondering if our sentient machines will be similar to alien sentient machines in terms of neural architecture..

Would our cylons' brains look like the alien-cylon brains?

Will we make many different 'types' of intelligences?

eburacum45
2012-Apr-23, 09:11 AM
Absolutely. There is a concept known as 'mind space' which attempts to imagine the innumerable different types of mind that may be possible. Another term sometimes used is 'toposophy', a word invented by Stanislaw Lem which means 'the shape of wisdom'.

Here's an image by Eliezer Yudkowsky which shows what a map of mindspace might look like.
http://lesswrong.com/static/imported/2008/06/24/mindspace_2.png
The space inhabited by human minds is shown as a crimson circle; augmented human minds (which he calls 'transhuman minds) might occupy the orange ellipse, which fully posthuman minds (entities that are way beyond humanity, but which have some or all of the qualities of human minds) occupy the dark blue ellipse.

Random AI mindtypes (givebn the arbitrary lables 'gloopy', 'freepy' and 'bipping') occupy different regions of the sphere, which represents the phase space of all possible mind types. Of course the extent and shape of this space, and of most of the others, is not known. We can only begin to guess at the shape of human mindspace. let allone try to imagine what non-human minds would be like. But perhaps the study of animal minds might give us a few clues as to the unknown territory.

mutleyeng
2012-Apr-23, 09:47 AM
yep, quite an interesting thought.
I would suspect there might be more than intelligence required to have an artificial "Mind".
Perhaps the mind, if such a thing is possible, is where the way one thinks would vary, not the processing power.

eburacum45
2012-Apr-23, 02:27 PM
I agree with this too.

Neanderthal brains probably had more processing power than H.sapiens brains, but they appear to have thought in a different way to H.sapiens, possibly a less efficient or a less adaptable way.

Gomar
2012-Apr-24, 01:54 AM
you'd wake up and be at the other side of the galaxy.
I'm wondering if our sentient machines will be similar to alien sentient machines?

sounds good. However, where are the alien robots? Yes, it wouldnt matter if a machine were to fly for 100m years from one
to another galaxy. Thus, a few of them should have gotten here by now. Same with probes, or signals, or warp drive,
or inter-dimensional travel... someone or something would've arrived on Earth by now.