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Jeff Root
2012-May-06, 09:46 PM
Gee, that'd be great!


It is universally agreed that the trick to cooking eggs
properly is to avoid overcooking them. But...

Does that mean cooking them quickly and getting them
off the heat as soon as possible, even though it requires
cooking them at a higher temperature, or cooking them
very gently and slowly even though it requires cooking
them for a longer time?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Moose
2012-May-06, 10:14 PM
A bit lower for a bit longer. If you raise the heat, you'll scorch the egg white.

Van Rijn
2012-May-06, 10:35 PM
Gee, that'd be great!


It is universally agreed that the trick to cooking eggs
properly is to avoid overcooking them. But...


But one person's "overcooking" is another person's "undercooking." I don't eat eggs often these days, but when I do, I want them cooked. I don't like super-soft eggs - I want them on the dry side.

Van Rijn
2012-May-06, 10:39 PM
A bit lower for a bit longer. If you raise the heat, you'll scorch the egg white.

I want egg-white a bit scorched if I'm going to eat an egg that way, but I usually eat whole-egg omeletts with some other stuff worked in if I'm going to eat egg at all.

Jeff Root
2012-May-06, 11:35 PM
Well, now I *have* to tell my sister's story.

She was somewhere in the southern US. I think it was
New Orleans. On vacation. She went to a restaurant
for breakfast, and told the waitress that she wanted
eggs.

"How would you like them done?"

"Solid."

"What kind of salad you want, honey?"


-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Romanus
2012-May-06, 11:38 PM
Low heat for longer. I tend to keep the heat high, though, because I'm impatient.

pzkpfw
2012-May-07, 08:51 AM
Well, now I *have* to tell my sister's story. ...

For that matter, the title of this thread makes me wonder why someone wants their eggs repaired!

Nick Theodorakis
2012-May-07, 11:27 AM
I like fried eggs with the yolk runny, so for me, it's high heat, and then turn over very briefly just to set the white on top but leave the yolk runny. But this weekend I made a feta cheese and spinach omelet for my daughters.

Nick

Solfe
2012-May-07, 11:41 AM
I make my kids scrambled eggs "firm with a touch of brown", with a low heat. Once you have a touch a brown, they are done.

No one at my house likes Sunny Side Up, which is good because I always squish the yokes getting them on the plate. Maybe that is reason no one likes them.

HenrikOlsen
2012-May-07, 12:00 PM
I make my kids scrabbled eggs
Cut into the shape of letters or covered with writing?

Solfe
2012-May-07, 12:23 PM
Cut into the shape of letters or covered with writing?

Ugh... I am in speed mode. I can't type to save my wife this week.

LookingSkyward
2012-May-07, 12:36 PM
All the king's horses and all the king's men...

grapes
2012-May-07, 01:03 PM
Fixed!

I just told my wife the story of a friend of mine who went to Mexico forty years ago, and tried to ask for eggs. Everywhere she went, they laughed at her. I guess it would be like asking a teenage clerk at Walmart if they had balls.

Wasn't it Nero Wolfe who said eggs were to be cooked "slowly"? Slow scrambled=small creamy curd

Trebuchet
2012-May-07, 02:21 PM
Poached for me. Whites firm, yolks runny. I detest raw egg white. It's like eating mucus!

Of course, if you happen to set the perfectly poached egg atop a hunk of Canadian bacon, atop an English muffin, and cover it with Hollandaise sauce, that's even better. And very international.

Cougar
2012-May-10, 01:27 PM
Over easy isn't cooked enough. Over hard is cooked too much. But if you ever order over medium, you get over easy. From my experience, there's no such thing as over medium. :sad:

danscope
2012-May-11, 04:28 AM
Patience will be rewarded. I hate tupperware eggs. Plastic consistency reflects non-talent when cooking eggs.
Get a good HEAVY DUTY non-stick pan and Keep it for eggs "And Nothing Else".
I have a small one for single breakfast and larger for doing dual breakfast. A slight pre-heat and then a little butter. Break eggs into a bowl. If the egg falls apart, it is not a good or fresh egg.
The eggs go in all at once. They cook slowly, but it really doesn't take That long. A shake of the pan confirms that they are no sticking. Homefries or grits take much longer. Time to make toast or english muffins or bagels . The plates are already in the counter top oven at 200°.
" Hot Food..... Hot Plates !" Graham Kerr
It is easy to flip the eggs in the pan for 'over easy' . One minute and out on the second side.
A little celery salt, fresh cracked pepper and a little dill weed make a tasty fried egg.
Pour the grits on a warm plate and place eggs on top. Meat optional.... sigh.
Ah.... some sour dough toast or pumpernickel , or perhaps a nice seeded rye.
Some days ... it's oatmeal with sauteed apples and walnuts w/cinnamon. Unnn doggies.

Now .... for soft scrambled eggs, I add a little water and a little half n half after I've beaten them and seasoned . This wants a larger non-stick pan with a heavy bottom ( needs the mass to transfer heat ). Medium high heat... add butter ( a plastic fork works well for this).
Pour eggs into pan without delay or burning butter. Scramble with plastic fork. This happens fast.
The added moisture turns to steam and permeates the eggs, making them soft and fluffy.
A little fresh cracked pepper, dash of dill and into the plate. Done. Ready for succeeding batches.
Sometimes with addition of smoked salmon (chopped) or even a little sauteed onion.
Omlets are a small variation on technique. Watch Jacque Pepin. He is a genuine master.

Poached are done slowly, never boiled. I keep a towel handy , quarter folded with a folded paper towel on top of that. Eggs are removed with a plastic spyder and drained, then laid against the paper towel ( removes vinegar and water) and then plated. Simple and delicious.
Ah... for the corned beef hash, but that's another show.
Best regards,
Dan

pzkpfw
2012-May-11, 04:52 AM
Best regards,
Dan

Two questions:
1. What are grits?
2. What's your physical location and what time(s) are you home? (I'll bring eggs).

HenrikOlsen
2012-May-11, 06:02 AM
1. What are grits?
Imagine porridge made from ground maize.

Jeff Root
2012-May-11, 12:04 PM
Break eggs into a bowl. If the egg falls apart, it is not a
good or fresh egg.
You mean, if the shell crumbles? Thirty-five or forty years
ago I could crack eggs open on the edge of a bowl with one
hand. Now they always crumble, so I use a knife. I think it
is because the hens don't get as much calcium as they did
in the olden days.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

SeanF
2012-May-11, 01:14 PM
Imagine porridge made from ground maize.
My people call it "corn". :)

mike alexander
2012-May-11, 01:29 PM
My people call it "corn". :)

Showin' your age.

HenrikOlsen
2012-May-11, 01:39 PM
My people call it "corn". :)
I deliberately chose a word that doesn't have different meanings depending on who reads it.

grapes
2012-May-11, 01:40 PM
Over easy isn't cooked enough. Over hard is cooked too much. But if you ever order over medium, you get over easy. From my experience, there's no such thing as over medium. :sad:Weird. In my experience, if you order over easy you get over medium! It wasn't until just a few years ago that I even discovered there was an over medium. :)

SeanF
2012-May-11, 01:41 PM
Showin' your age.
Yeah, I know. And with Pzkpfw being from New Zealand and Henrik being from Denmark, I'm probably showing my culture (such as it is), too. :)

EDIT: See what I mean?

I deliberately chose a word that doesn't have different meanings depending on who reads it.
I realize that, Henrik. It was a joke, but only people with a good memory of 1970s-era US television commercials would get it. :)

mike alexander
2012-May-11, 08:02 PM
I made an egg sandwich for breakfast. Fry two eggs until the whites are just done. Break the yolk onto a slice of toast and spread it around, then put the rest on top.

danscope
2012-May-11, 08:07 PM
Hi PZKPFW, Ah... Grits. It's a kind of hard corn meal which when cooked is transformed into a
fine side dish. Takes about twenty minutes. Needs a non-stick sauce pan and a glass lid, and a flat wooden spoon so as to scrape the bottom cleanly. Take a cup and a quarter of water, bring to a boil; stir in a little less than a 1/4 cup of grits( I'll refine this later) and a small pinch of saltand 2 pats of butter. This helps with the sticking.
Stir , cover and reduce heat to low .The grits should be slightly bubbling, but not at a fast boil. Set timer to 5 minutes. Every 5 minutes, scrape and stir the grits. They will try to stick a little the first time. Grate some cheddar ( 2 or 3 ounces ) and stir that in. A teaspoon of bacon fat tastes great, but you can live without it. After 15 minutes, season with fresh cracked pepper. If at any time, the grits seem too thick, add a little hot water...sparingly and stir. They should be smooth
and silky. Serve warm with eggs.
There's not much to go wrong except too much heat or no timer to remind you to stir.
That wooden flat end spatula won't hurt your pan and it will do a clean job of stirring your grits.
Let me know if you like them. It's really a southern dish. I was on a diesel submarine with a bunch of southern guys who needed grits to survive. :)
Best regards,
Dan
ps: Don't waste your money on 'instant grits' . Wretched stuff. Not the same at all.

Cougar
2012-May-11, 08:41 PM
Weird. In my experience, if you order over easy you get over medium! It wasn't until just a few years ago that I even discovered there was an over medium. :)Apparently North Carolina is in a completely different Universe than the Wild West, you know, with different physical constants and everything. And here I thought the multiverse was going to be really hard to prove...

HenrikOlsen
2012-May-11, 10:16 PM
Apparently North Carolina is in a completely different Universe than the Wild West, you know, with different physical constants and everything. And here I thought the multiverse was going to be really hard to prove...
Recent evidence indicates you're right.

danscope
2012-May-12, 01:49 AM
Hi, I weighed the grits out at 50 grams. This makes enough for two people.
The Quaker ( oats) company make grits.
Down south they put a tablespoon of butter right on top of those grits and then the sunny side eggs. I tend to go a little leaner, saving my butter for the toast or the muffin. I put some in the cooking though.
Best regards,
Dan

grapes
2012-May-12, 02:26 AM
No, not just North Carolina. I spent most of my life in Wyoming, and a good chunk of it in Colorado. I'd never heard anyone even mention over medium until I ordered over easy in Florida and they came back, well, over easy. My server asked how things were (I wasn't complaining, I've eaten raw eggs many times), and she said O you wanted over medium. I almost laughed, but instead I looked it up.

I always thought that over easy just meant don't break the yolk.

ravens_cry
2012-May-12, 02:56 AM
Over . . .whatever, so they are golden brown and crunchy on both sides, but still gooey in the yolk.
Difficult, but delicious when done right.

swampyankee
2012-May-15, 01:11 AM
Over easy.

Gemini
2012-May-15, 01:15 AM
Shaken, not stirred.

Jeff Root
2012-May-15, 01:39 AM
Somebody told me he made eggnog that way once.
He said it worked. I doubt that, but I haven't tested
it myself to find out.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

billslugg
2012-May-17, 10:52 PM
When you grind dried corn in a stone mill, the output contains a coarse component that is sifted out of the corn meal. This product is comprised mainly of the germ of the seed. It is harder and does not want to turn into flour. It was considered an inferior food for poor people. By soaking and boiling it is made palatable. My state, Georgia, appointed grits as the state Prepared Food in 2002.

mike alexander
2012-May-17, 10:55 PM
After further thought, I realized I like my eggs prepared by someone else.

Trebuchet
2012-May-17, 11:39 PM
It's just occurred to me that if you make boiled eggs, you are fixing something that isn't broken, even though you intend to break it later!

grapes
2012-May-18, 12:55 AM
You're suggesting we should make an exception to BAUT's motto? If it ain't broke, don't fix it, except boiled eggs? I'll add it to the agenda for this summer's mod meeting in São Tomé (they're thinking of re-naming Pico Cão Grande to the Great Mod Peak).

nosbig5
2012-May-18, 02:37 PM
After further thought, I realized I like my eggs prepared by someone else.

Amen to that, brother!

I rarely eat eggs unless we go out for breakfast.


Over . . .whatever, so they are golden brown and crunchy on both sides, but still gooey in the yolk.
Difficult, but delicious when done right.

This is the perfect way to eat a fried egg. I like most of my hot foods to be a little "singed."


To paraphrase Dos Equis, "I don't always eat eggs, but when I do I prefer over-hard"

weatherc
2012-May-18, 03:08 PM
It depends on how I want my eggs that day.

Scrambled? Low heat with a lot of stirring/agitation while cooking; best when mixed with a little milk or half-and-half before pouring into the pan. The trick with scrambled eggs is to take them off the heat before they're completely done, and allow for some carryover cooking. Done correctly, they turn out slightly fluffy.

Omelet? Medium to medium-high heat, cooked until a little brown.

Over easy? Medium to medium-high heat, a little brown on the bottom, flipped over for just a few seconds.