PDA

View Full Version : To Nook/Kindle or to NOT Nook/Kindle?



Buttercup
2012-May-08, 10:26 PM
Well fiddle-dee-dee. :(

I'm discovering some book titles I'd probably like to read ... which are only available in ebook format.

I prefer old-fashioned books: Nifty covers, made of paper, turn the pages with your hand!

Don't want to spend $150 or so on a contraption to read "books." Especially as I'm a picky reader. I also don't want to be gawking at yet another screen (get enough of a computer screen in my work).

But apparently I'm going to lose out on reading some "books" if I don't buy a Nook or Kindle.

Hmmmm. :(

Advice?

Rhaedas
2012-May-08, 10:30 PM
Have you gone to one of the stores and tried them out? I think it's one of those things that you'll either learn how to use it comfortably, or you'll never like it. Best way to find out is to play around with one. That's actually true with a lot of things...

Buttercup
2012-May-08, 10:38 PM
Have you gone to one of the stores and tried them out? I think it's one of those things that you'll either learn how to use it comfortably, or you'll never like it. Best way to find out is to play around with one. That's actually true with a lot of things...

Not yet, because I've only discovered *today* a series of titles I might want to read (of a particular genre).

I'm sure I could easily become comfortable with it. However:

1. Will "just about any" ebook play on either device? If I buy a Nook, I don't want to then discover many ebooks only play on Kindle (or vice versa).

2. How many of these ebooks (which were never formally paper published) are any good? Did they pass the same sort of muster a paper book must pass (via agent, publishing house, etc.)?

I'd want to make sure I get my money's worth.

HenrikOlsen
2012-May-08, 10:50 PM
You can get an e-book reader for your pc and read them on that screen without investing in a proprietary device.

I use Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com) but there are likely lots of others as well. It also has the ability to convert between a huge amount of formats so if a book is only available for one device, you can convert to another format to fit another device.

I expect DRM'ed content aren't easily converted though, but that would probably mostly be a problem with Amazon and the kindle.

Van Rijn
2012-May-09, 12:35 AM
Not yet, because I've only discovered *today* a series of titles I might want to read (of a particular genre).

I'm sure I could easily become comfortable with it. However:

1. Will "just about any" ebook play on either device? If I buy a Nook, I don't want to then discover many ebooks only play on Kindle (or vice versa).


The Kindle and Nook use different ebook formats. If you use one of the specialized devices you have to check if your ebook is available on the hardware you buy. Often ebooks are available for both Kindle and Nook but not always. Don't just look at Amazon or B&N either - depending on the ebook, it might be available elsewhere.

If the book isn't DRMed, it is usually possible to convert formats with the right software, but a lot of publishers insist on DRM. Also, a format conversion sometimes leaves artifacts.

I consider DRM incredibly stupid, because it makes the ebooks almost useless for my purposes (I collect books and ebooks, I don't buy them just to read and toss). I avoid DRMed ebooks. I was happy recently when Tor said they are officially moving away from it, but many publishers are not.



2. How many of these ebooks (which were never formally paper published) are any good?


How many of the paper publised ones are any good? Anyway, I'd probably avoid anything unless there were either reviews from someone who has similar tastes or a sample so I can get an idea about the writing.

By the way, I usually get ebooks because I don't have room for paper versions, not because there is no paper version. I suspect that will be changing though (the publishing trend is clearly towards more ebooks, fewer paper books).



Did they pass the same sort of muster a paper book must pass (via agent, publishing house, etc.)?


It depends. Sometimes they do, often they do not. I'd recommend researching it for whatever you're interested in. If you can't find anything with a quick search, I'd assume no outside review was done.

schlaugh
2012-May-09, 02:02 AM
Another option, just to further confuse the issue; buy an iPad and download the Kindle and Nook apps. A new iPad new is s more expensive than the readers, but more versatile. And you can probably find a used iPad-1 for about the price of the Kindle Fire.

PetersCreek
2012-May-09, 03:53 AM
I have both the Nook Mk I and the Nook Tablet. In fact, I'm posting this using the latter. I went with the Nook platform, in part, because it isn't limited solely to the B&N ebook format. It also supports the EPUB format which is offered at a number of third party ebook sites and it's even available for loan at many public libraries. It also supports the PDF format.

I like the feel of a paper book, too but I also like the convenient portability of an entire library of ebooks, references, and a handful of emags to which I subscribe...and nothing in the Nook EULA says I have stop buying paper!

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2012-May-09, 03:56 AM
How much do you care about presentation? The most common e-book formats* are ultimately derived from web standards, so currently, an e-book isn't actually an approximation of a book, but rather an approximation of a web browser's crude simulacrum of a book.

So if you might be bothered by things like little-to-no support for proper hyphenation and justification of text, the chance of a nearly-blank page before an image, poor handling of endnotes (and no footnotes), tables and captions that spill onto the next page, the occasional book with blank lines between paragraphs instead of indentation†, etc., then you should probably hold off on getting an e-reader for a decade or two. By then, the W3C should be nearly finished with creating the CSS3 specification, so there's a (small) chance the e-book formats in use at that time will finally have a properly defined model for displaying paged media.


* Not counting fixed-page formats like .pdf, which are even more inconvenient on e-readers than they are on computers.

† This one can sometimes be fixed, but only if the e-book isn't protected by DRM.

Van Rijn
2012-May-09, 04:49 AM
How much do you care about presentation? The most common e-book formats* are ultimately derived from web standards, so currently, an e-book isn't actually an approximation of a book, but rather an approximation of a web browser's crude simulacrum of a book.

So if you might be bothered by things like little-to-no support for proper hyphenation and justification of text, the chance of a nearly-blank page before an image, poor handling of endnotes (and no footnotes), tables and captions that spill onto the next page, the occasional book with blank lines between paragraphs instead of indentation†, etc., then you should probably hold off on getting an e-reader for a decade or two.


Application probably matters here. I usually use my Kindle 3 to read fiction, and I have very little trouble with formatting that's inherent to the device software. I do notice spelling errors substantially more often than in paper books, but that's a file creation issue, often from somebody doing a cheap conversion of a paper book. Footnote handling on the Kindle 3 could be better, but that's partly due to the clunky keyboard interface. Still, I don't have many ebooks with footnotes, so it's not a big issue to me.

GeorgeLeRoyTirebiter
2012-May-09, 06:11 AM
Application probably matters here.

To a certain extent, yes, but even non-illustrated fiction will have some of these problems (like no proper H&J). Not everyone will be bothered by, or even notice, such things, but for those of us who do, e-books can be rather annoying at times. The current reality of e-reading falls far short of its potential.

Perikles
2012-May-09, 06:32 AM
Well, the Kindle has transformed our household. I'm very resistant to any change, and was very sceptical about a new method of reading. But the kindle is a good alternative to a book with pages, with added features like built-in dictionary and search functions. The passive screen display is much less tiring on the eyes than a computer screen.

My wife is a compulsive serial reader, and it would cost a fortune feeding her habit by adding to our books which are crammed into our tiny house. A kindle has reduced the cost and space requirements to a minimum (fortunately, her taste is for e-books which are free or very cheap). One real advantage is when living in a cultural desert with no bookshop within reach. You search Amazon, press a button on the computer, and a whole book is downloaded onto the kindle before you have had time to look away from the computer - a book that will keep the wife happy for a whole week. Magic.

Tog
2012-May-09, 07:33 AM
1. Will "just about any" ebook play on either device? If I buy a Nook, I don't want to then discover many ebooks only play on Kindle (or vice versa).
This depends on a LOT of factors. The publisher that picked up my first story formats every manuscript for several different readers. There is a Nook format version, a Kindle version, a Smashwords version, and a few others. if you buy the books from the publisher's site, you can select from four different versions, but you have to to download it through a cable from your computer.

If I were to self publish a story through Amazon's store, it would only be available on a Kindle. I could choose to publish it on another format, but nothing says I'm required to.


2. How many of these ebooks (which were never formally paper published) are any good? Did they pass the same sort of muster a paper book must pass (via agent, publishing house, etc.)? Sturgeon's Law. 90% of everything is crap.

For my publisher, there is no agent. I submit my story directly to them. They review it and decide to take it on, or not. If they do, It goes through two editors, one for content and one for typos/grammar, then to a cover artist. When the entire things is complete, I get a galley copy to look over and spot any mistakes that made it through all the other passes. Once I approve that, it's set in stone.

Print publishing follows a similar format, with one big exception. If I sell to an e-publisher, I don't get money up front. I'm selling my book on commission, and everyone gets a cut. I get 40%. The editors get some of it, the cover artist gets some, and the publisher gets the rest. I'm paid nothing up front. My story sells for $2.50, so I get $1 for every sale.

If I had sold that same story to Alfred Hitchcock or Ellery Queen Magazine, I would have gotten 5 cents per word, or about $350, before it ever saw print. For novels, the author will get a royalty, but that comes out of the authors advance before they get any more money. If I sell a novel and get a $50,000 advance, but I only qualify for $40,000 in royalties, I'll probably get dropped as a bad investment.

What does this mean? It means that an e-publisher can afford to take a few more chances when it comes to quality and standards. With print, there is the cost of actually printing the book to take into account, after the author is paid and before the first copy is ever sold. With an e-book, there is no limit to the number of sales that are possible. Once the initial cost to get the cover art is paid, and the time spent editing and formatting it all is done, there are no further costs.

If a paper publisher tried to operate that way, they'd go under fairly quickly because the payments for advances and purchases would quickly outpace the revenue those stories generated.

E-publishers MAY have the same quality standards as print publishers, and the upper levels of both will be roughly the same, but the lower levels for e-pubs will generally be lower than with print.

Unless it's self published.

One of the rallying cries of the "indie fiction" or self publishing movement is that it gives the common person a way to bypass the Gategeepers. Gatekeepers being the publishing industry. If I write something that is totally unintelligible dreck, no one will touch it. Nothing prevents me from self publishing it, so I can do that. In my deluded state, I know I don't to waste money on an editor, and what's the point of a pretty cover? "The Gatekeeprs" can be thought of as a form of peer review for fiction. They may block the occasional great book from getting published, but far more often, they keep the bad stuff out.

There are some self published books that are very good. Most are not. If the book has gone through a publishing house, look them up on Preditors and Editors (http://pred-ed.com/) to get some idea of their reputation in the industry. That can get give some idea of the general quality, but the error bars are wide.

I'd want to make sure I get my money's worth.[/QUOTE]

For what it's worth, I love my Kindle. I went with the cheapest one (with the ads) and can find few things I don't like about it. I'd like a real keyboard, and the storage space is half that of the other versions, but the ads only appear on the "closed" cover and one small pop up on the main menu screen. They never appear while you read.

You can also find a lot of books for free.

HenrikOlsen
2012-May-09, 10:50 AM
I would add that just as there are good authors and bad authors, there are good self publishing companies and bad self publishing companies.

For the budding author who decides to go the self-published route, picking the wrong publisher can easily break a career. The bad ones can't get their books listed on Amazon or B&A, while the good ones can, and spent their time promoting themselves rather than their authors.

The hallmark of a good, legit self-publishing company is that their website is used for selling the books of their authors rather than on selling their own publishing services.

Buttercup
2012-May-09, 12:41 PM
Thanks for replies. I can't buy something to read on this computer, as it is owned by the company I'm employed with (despite working in my home). I might opt for an iPad, as Schlaugh suggests:
Another option, just to further confuse the issue; buy an iPad and download the Kindle and Nook apps.

To answer Tog, regarding quality of publication (or not), I'm concerned some of these ebooks might be the equivalent of fan fic. I can read fan fic in various forums (for free). Some are good, most are not. True -- a lot of (old-fashioned) published stuff isn't good either; but a publishing house does put its $$ behind the product. Whereas if just anyone can write and "publish" an ebook that I'll have to pay to read...

Extravoice
2012-May-09, 12:51 PM
I'll add my 2¢ to the discussion. I have a Kindle 2 that I received as a gift about two years ago, and I like it a lot. I've definitely read more since getting it, especially stuff I wouldn't have read otherwise (such as the complete Sherlock Holmes series, and short stories of Edgar Allan Poe). I really like the built-in dictionary that allows you to look-up words in-line (handy for Victorian era stories) and the variable font size. On the downside, I find the display contrast lacking (improved since the Kindle 2) and the rendering of pictures is "fair" at best. The most annoying thing is that it is hard to tell how far it is to the next chapter or end of a story. I like to read before bed, and sometimes it would be nice to know if I should push a little further to get to a break-point.

The quality of e-books varies widely. At the low end, there are tables of contents with link errors, formatting mistakes, spelling errors, and funny characters. I think some cheap books are just optically scanned without review. But they are not the only offenders. The first book I bought for the Kindle was "Death from the Skies" and it was awful (the rendition, not the content). Number formats were wrong, and anything in scientific notation was a mess of numbers. Anything with a negative exponent became a positive exponent! Non-standard characters (i.e. Greek letters) were translated wrong. It was so bad that I complained to the author. He seems to be a nice guy ;), and told me he would contact the publisher. I later saw that it was removed from the Kindle store but has since reappeared. Maybe they fixed it.

Most books are formatted fairly well, and I even have a Linux technical reference that is easier to search than the paper copy.

My daughter has a newer Kindle with the touch screen, but I actually like the older keyboard and joystick interface better.

Paul Beardsley
2012-May-09, 05:33 PM
I am evangelical about the Kindle. I utterly love it. After 35 years of being fascinated by books almost to the point of obsession, my relationship with the printed medium has changed radically.

What I like about the Kindle:

The display is so pleasant on the eye! Buttercup, I urge you not to get an iPad for this purpose (although it might serve you well in other areas). In bright sunlight, the Kindle display is more comfortable to read than paper. If you are feeling tired, you can make the font bigger. On some models, you can even get it to read to you.

I can buy books that take up no physical space. My impulse book purchasing was made less enjoyable by having to find space for it.

The range of books seems to be vastly increased. For the last couple of decades, every book seemed to be a fatty. Nobody seemed to be publishing books under 200 pages - or even 400 pages. Most of the time I want one-night stands with books - I don't want to marry them! But that is how the market was.

Now, the lack of constraints on publishing means you can pretty much get anything you like. Now, I understand the concern about buying fanfic, but generally, unknown authors charge £0.77 (about a dollar) for their books. On Amazon, if the book is any good, it has probably been reviewed. But best of all, you get to read a free sample. When you get to the end of the sample, you either think, "Good grief, he calls himself an author when he can't even spell!" or you think, "Argh! Where's the rest? I want that book NOW!"

Purchases on Amazon take seconds. You can have more than one Kindle signed up to an account so you and your partner/spouse/friend can be reading the same book at the same time. (Clare and I are both reading a self-published piece called Extinction Point by Paul Jones. It averaged 5 stars from 23 reviews. It's short and very enjoyable.)

At one time, if you wanted an obscure, out-of-print or just not particularly popular book, you had to search new and second hand bookshops. Now, you can get it very quickly, if it's been released on Kindle. (As time goes on, more and more will be available that way, including some very hard to get books.)

A lot of classics are free.

It surprises the heck out of me to say this, but I prefer the feel of the Kindle to that of a book. It's lighter than most books, and you don't have to reposition yourself when you change from odd to even pages.

The dictionary is useful. You can also search, which is helpful if you can't remember when Millicent Gubbins first appeared.

In my experience so far, Amazon are good people. I am happy with my relationship with this company.

Downside:

Most of what Extravoice said, although my newer Kindle seems less prone to some of those problems. Pictures are generally not as good - if you want colour pictures, go with a paper book. "How far to the end of the chapter?" is a pain - although with some books you can press the right arrow, look at the page number (with Menu), then press the back button.

There are many books in my house that I will never read.

Buttercup
2012-May-09, 05:41 PM
I am evangelical about the Kindle. I utterly love it. After 35 years of being fascinated by books almost to the point of obsession, my relationship with the printed medium has changed radically.

What I like about the Kindle:

The display is so pleasant on the eye! Buttercup, I urge you not to get an iPad for this purpose (although it might serve you well in other areas). In bright sunlight, the Kindle display is more comfortable to read than paper. If you are feeling tired, you can make the font bigger.

That's good to know! Thanks. :)


On some models, you can even get it to read to you.

Yes, I've just found that out via a member of an E-group of mine, who said he pastes and copies my text -- and his Kindle reads it aloud. :confused: I had no idea he was able to do this, was doing it! Cool. :D


I can buy books that take up no physical space. My impulse book purchasing was made less enjoyable by having to find space for it.

Not so much an issue; however, I think my husband is tired of the mounting pile ... Lol!!

I priced the iPad; yikes. :( Looks wonderful and I'd love to have one (of those too!) ... but I could put that $500 against a credit card, or even take a mini-vacation with it (vacation? what's a vacation??).

Really appreciate all the feedback on this. :)

slang
2012-May-09, 05:45 PM
I've got a cheap old'ish Android tablet PC that I use for reading Ebooks, and I'm a fan of FBreader (http://www.fbreader.org/). Calibre (link in Henrik's post) is great to convert to EPUB, but FBreader supports several other formats as well. And it's free. :) The downside of using a cheap tablet is that I can't use it outside.. due to glare and contrast issues. I hear current tablets are a lot better at that.

PetersCreek
2012-May-09, 06:20 PM
What I like about the Kindle:

The display is so pleasant on the eye! Buttercup, I urge you not to get an iPad for this purpose (although it might serve you well in other areas). In bright sunlight, the Kindle display is more comfortable to read than paper. If you are feeling tired, you can make the font bigger. On some models, you can even get it to read to you.

This is the very reason I kept my Nook Mk I after stepping up to the Nook Tablet. While most of my reading is indoors, I do occasionally enjoy reading a book on the deck.

antoniseb
2012-May-09, 06:27 PM
I'm slow to adopt... I don't have a Nook/Kindle, probably won't ever have one... because I got an Android based tablet a week ago, and will use that. I use it now for reading product documentation at work. I'll probably add intended-fiction to my reading on it in a week or two.

Van Rijn
2012-May-09, 07:40 PM
The range of books seems to be vastly increased. For the last couple of decades, every book seemed to be a fatty. Nobody seemed to be publishing books under 200 pages - or even 400 pages. Most of the time I want one-night stands with books - I don't want to marry them! But that is how the market was.


That's an interesting point (lots of interesting points in this thread, I really liked Tog's post, for instance). Just to add to that, I've read 600 page books that would have been far better if they had been 200 pages long - far too much filler material. I avoid some authors these days because they have too much filler (I don't mind a long book if it's good, but too many aren't).



On Amazon, if the book is any good, it has probably been reviewed.


But beware that those reviews might be from friends. I've seen great reviews on incredibly bad stuff. I like to do a quick google as well.



But best of all, you get to read a free sample. When you get to the end of the sample, you either think, "Good grief, he calls himself an author when he can't even spell!" or you think, "Argh! Where's the rest? I want that book NOW!"


That usually works well. If it's really bad, I can usually tell in a screen or two.

Paul Beardsley
2012-May-09, 07:49 PM
I've read 600 page books that would have been far better if they had been 200 pages long - far too much filler material. I avoid some authors these days because they have too much filler (I don't mind a long book if it's good, but too many aren't).

This might be worth its own thread. I remember reading Dune when I was 15 (same age as the main character who was also called Paul) and I could understand why it was so long. But in my experience, only a minority justify their length. SF books often work best when they explore an idea... but they're also better when they leave you wanting more, rather than feeling as if you've just read an entire reference book about an object oriented programming language through some distorted sense of duty.


But beware that those reviews might be from friends. I've seen great reviews on incredibly bad stuff. I like to do a quick google as well.

Oh, granted. There was one I tried which was borderline illiterate, with the author determined not to use the word "said" when telling us what each character said.


That usually works well. If it's really bad, I can usually tell in a screen or two.

Yes, so far the sample has proven an excellent guide. Of course you can't tell if the plot twists are going to be lame, but at least you can tell if s/he has mastered English.

Van Rijn
2012-May-09, 07:50 PM
Yes, I've just found that out via a member of an E-group of mine, who said he pastes and copies my text -- and his Kindle reads it aloud. :confused: I had no idea he was able to do this, was doing it! Cool. :D


A couple of limitations: Some ebooks with DRM make that unavailable. Also, the rhythm of the speech is wrong. I don't use it because I much prefer reading.

Solfe
2012-May-09, 11:59 PM
I should be studying, but I have a Kobo Touch, $79 Kindle, Coby Kyros and a Fire.

If you aren't interested in the Fire, then the $79 Kindle is the best of the next three. The Coby Kyros is slow to respond, it is basically a large cell phone with no phone. The Kobo is good, but has a funny reaction to wind/sun/cold - they make the touch screen unresponsive. I like the Kindle for the buttons. The response from a mechanical button may not be any faster or better, but you never wonder if you clicked something. The Kindle screen seems sharper than the Kobo, but both are better than the Kyros.

I also use Calibre for all of my books on the Kobo and Kindle. (My wife as claimed the Fire and my son the Coby. My son is all wireless and free books, so no computer is needed. I am not sure what my wife does with the Fire.) One thing I do advise is that you install the software as per the directions on the product. This will unlock features and update the product. After that, I would stop using it and switch to Calibre.

crosscountry
2012-May-10, 02:18 AM
You can get an e-book reader for your pc and read them on that screen without investing in a proprietary device.

I use Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com) but there are likely lots of others as well. It also has the ability to convert between a huge amount of formats so if a book is only available for one device, you can convert to another format to fit another device.

I expect DRM'ed content aren't easily converted though, but that would probably mostly be a problem with Amazon and the kindle.

I use Calibre also. It is a fantastic program, enough so that I donated money to their group. I have had no trouble converting kindle format to my nook.


The Nook is great. Small, longer battery life, expandable memory, and touch screen. I couldn't be happier, and with all of the free classic books, I've got plenty to read.

Scriitor
2012-May-10, 02:27 AM
You can get an e-book reader for your pc and read them on that screen without investing in a proprietary device.

I use Calibre (http://calibre-ebook.com) but there are likely lots of others as well. It also has the ability to convert between a huge amount of formats so if a book is only available for one device, you can convert to another format to fit another device.

I expect DRM'ed content aren't easily converted though, but that would probably mostly be a problem with Amazon and the kindle.

Irresponsible rumour has it that, with the right unofficial but easily found plug-ins, Calibre is easily able to strip DRM from ebooks, including those from Amazon.

Tog
2012-May-10, 07:48 AM
I think I'm seeing a little bit of confusion about a few things. Right now, there are three main groups as far as publishing goes. There's a fourth, but it's practically dead, and was never all that relevant in the first place.

1. Traditional print publishers are those that make paper books you find in stores. These are the big names that have been around for ages. They want marketable* things.

2. E-publishers are similar to traditional publishers, except they don't work with paper. Top levels of quality can be as high as traditional publishing, but the lower levels may not be a high. That said, I've read some really bad stuff recently that came out 60 years ago, it it was considered good enough to get a series.

3. Self publishing is mostly ebooks and can range from the top levels of quality to the incoherent babbling of the average YouTube comment page. One member of my writing forum self pubbed a novel and ended up getting contacted by an agent hoping to represent her. That's the opposite of how it normally works. Her book was well written and well marketed, which means it did very well at it's peak, and continues to do "not bad."

3a. Self publishing can also have printed books. A lot of these are Print on Demand (POD), and most of the services have gone over to eformats now. These were also some of the most common places to find scams.

Just because it's an Ebook doesn't mean it's a self published one. They are two different classes of publishing.

*Marketability is driven mainly by the publishing industry for print books, and one of the factors is word count. My stories tend to come out in the 15,000 to 30,000 word length. In print format, these are novellas, and no one will touch them. To sell that 15,000 word story to a print publisher, I'd need to expand it out to 60,000 to 80,000. That's where your filler comes in.

Some think ebooks will bring back the novella as a popular length, since publishers won't have to do a hardbound version that's only half an inch thick. My epublisher will accept any length from 3,000 up, and anything over 40,000 is eligible for printing on paper.

The problem is readers don't seem to care all that much about it at this point.

A recent study based on 6 months of data-mining at Smashwords showed that the best selling stories had the higher words counts, 120,000 at the top and trailing off evenly from there.

The data is in a slideshow at the bottom of the article (http://blog.smashwords.com/2012/04/can-ebook-data-reveal-new-viral.html).

Scriitor
2012-May-10, 10:18 AM
Interesting article, thanks.

HenrikOlsen
2012-May-10, 02:29 PM
As one datapoint, one of the best current Danish horror writers (as indicated by both sales and critics) is in category 3a, i.e. self published dead-tree books.
I think the scams were a large part of what has killed this segment.

profloater
2012-May-10, 02:43 PM
I have no commercial connection of course but I am also a converted Kindle fan even after breaking my screen by sleeping on it during a flight. All my books were available for my replacement one. All the classics are free or very cheap. You can set any font size, read in sunlight, annotate pages, dip into several books and keep the bookmarks effortlessly, downloads take a few seconds per book. You can put a thousand titles in your pocket for a holiday, Why be a Luddite?

sirius0
2012-May-12, 03:52 PM
Istarted my e-book affair with an old palm (25$ off ebay). I had the plucker app on it. I could read in sunlight etc because of the old LCD technology. Now I have a kindle (3 i think), love it. Has a bigger screen better than paper contrast for outdoors. Free 3G web browsing, I even get to my gmail. (note that the touch has limited browsing on 3g to amazon and wikipedia unless you are in a wifi hotspot so get the older models with 3G if browsing is important [the safari browser is a bit limited though cant open another tab etc]) I have bought two ebooks from amazon ther are many MOBI format books for free on Gutenburg (http://www.gutenberg.org) (mobi is a kindle compatible format). I print some journals to PDF and read them on the kindle; just a little tricky as the PDFs are actually pictures but works well one the right zoom is chosen. A strategy I use too is to get a sample, read it then if the full version is too expensive I go to abe (http://www.abebooks.com) and get the paper version cheap.

Buttercup
2012-May-12, 04:00 PM
Thanks again for all the input. :) I've since discovered 2 books I'd thought were only published electronically ARE available in print (their first form of publication). Yay! :D Will delay buying a gadget for now.

Ara Pacis
2012-May-20, 07:03 AM
As soon as they come out with an ebook with color e-ink and solar cells built in so that it can be solar powered just like regular books, I'm in.

jlhredshift
2012-May-20, 10:47 AM
My kindle has text to speech and I thought, "this is cool", but for some reason listening to a voice similar to how Stephen Hawking sounds, puts me to sleep.

Extravoice
2012-May-20, 12:40 PM
One more data point. My daughter has a newer touch-screen Kindle, and likes my older one better. The response of the touch screen is slow, and she says that she is often unsure if it is responding to her input. The buttons give a positive tactile feedback, even if the device takes a moment to respond. BTW: I just checked, and non-touch screen models are available, but cost more than the touch-screen version.

crosscountry
2012-May-29, 07:20 PM
One more data point. My daughter has a newer touch-screen Kindle, and likes my older one better. The response of the touch screen is slow, and she says that she is often unsure if it is responding to her input. The buttons give a positive tactile feedback, even if the device takes a moment to respond. BTW: I just checked, and non-touch screen models are available, but cost more than the touch-screen version.

While reading, the nook has buttons on the side to flip pages. Typing is easy on screen. Sometimes I 'double hit' the screen and have to back up.