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canopuss
2012-May-31, 02:53 AM
How accurate are allergy tests (prick test) ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skin_allergy_test

Number of years ago when I did it, it showed as if I am allergic to nuts, I eat nuts every days and don't have a problem with it.

Recently when my daughter did it, it showed as if she is allergic to soy milk, but she is not.

However, it did show other items which we are allergic to such as pollens.

ShinAce
2012-May-31, 03:21 AM
It was good for me. Found out I was allergic to hamsters and horses. Also oak and ragweed pollen. So I got rid of my hamster. My sinuses have been thanking me ever since.

My allergies aren't food allergies, they were asthma type allergies.

swampyankee
2012-May-31, 12:20 PM
I had a scratch test a number of years ago (I'm allergic to house dust, which probably means dust mite excrement). There is some subjectivity involved in grading the reactions to these tests, but it could be that some of the food allergens that are being used in the scratch test may be degraded by the digestive tract.

Swift
2012-May-31, 01:59 PM
I had the blood test version about a year ago and it was pretty worthless. My years of experience, my regular general practioner, and even the ENT who had the tests done tell me I have seasonal allergies to pollen, but the tests didn't show that. The ENT did explain some reason why the tests might not show anything, but I don't recall the reasons.

redshifter
2012-May-31, 07:33 PM
The tests worked great for me! I had severe allergies for years/decades to dust, various pollens, and mild allergies to dogs/cats. They got so bad that I needed nasal surgery a few years back (I won't go into the gory details...). After that I went on shot therapy. I've been pretty much 'cured' since completing the shot therapy a couple years ago.

DoggerDan
2012-Jun-04, 08:38 AM
How accurate are allergy tests (prick test)?

I never bothered, as I hate... Well, you get the idea. :)

On a more serious note, I'm sure I'm allergic to something. I've found if I try and isolate myself (closed windows, A/C on all the time), my allergies get worse. If I maintain an ongoing exposure, such as using windows for cooling -- open at night, closed when outside temp climbs past indoor temp -- my allergies drift into the background. I've read people who grow up and live in higher-allergen rural areas tend to have fewer allergies, so I'm thinking mere exposure or pollen counts aren't the entire picture.

I've also noticed if I'm eating a lot my allergies are worse, but while fasting they largely subside. Makes me think that food allergies may be the source of the "feed a fever; starve a cold" saying.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Jun-04, 08:46 AM
This would actually be entirely consistent with low-level allergy to something in your home, which gets concentrated when you closed it up and diluted when you have lots of air replacement.

DoggerDan
2012-Jun-05, 04:03 AM
This would actually be entirely consistent with low-level allergy to something in your home, which gets concentrated when you closed it up and diluted when you have lots of air replacement.

It would if the flare-ups occurred inside the home. No, they occur only when I step out after I've been couped up for days or weeks. I have no allergies while couped up inside, and provided I (myself, not my home) have regular exposure to the outdoors, my allergies subside.

Paracelsus
2012-Jun-05, 03:17 PM
I had the blood test version about a year ago and it was pretty worthless. My years of experience, my regular general practioner, and even the ENT who had the tests done tell me I have seasonal allergies to pollen, but the tests didn't show that. The ENT did explain some reason why the tests might not show anything, but I don't recall the reasons.

I had a scratch test, I think, and I agree that they are worthless. I was being tested for food allergies. I already know that I'm severely allergic to peanuts. This test also told me that I was highly allergic to eggs, even though I've never had a reaction to them, and also listed the following foods to which I was supposedly moderately allergic: wheat, corn, lettuce, tomatoes, strawberries, gluten, rye, oats, oranges, milk, chocolate, and a bunch of others. If I had taken this list seriously, I would have been reduced to eating nothing but poi. I threw the list in the trash instead.