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skwirlinator
2004-Sep-20, 10:10 AM
I really like the site on this url and I was wondering how accurate the information is.


This web page is designed to give everyone an idea of what our universe actually looks like. There are nine main maps on this web page, each one approximately ten times the scale of the previous one. The first map shows the nearest stars and then the other maps slowly expand out until we have reached the scale of the entire visible universe.


http://www.anzwers.org/free/universe/



This map attempts to show the entire visible Universe. The galaxies in the universe tend to collect into vast sheets and superclusters of galaxies surrounding large voids giving the universe a cellular appearance. Because light in the universe only travels at a fixed speed, we see objects at the edge of the universe when it was very young up to 14 billion years ago.



* Number of superclusters in the visible universe = 10 million
* Number of galaxy groups in the visible universe = 25 billion
* Number of large galaxies in the visible universe = 350 billion
* Number of dwarf galaxies in the visible universe = 3500 billion
* Number of stars in the visible universe = 30 billion trillion

http://www.anzwers.org/free/universe/universe.html


This web page created by Richard Powell. Last updated: 11 Nov 2003
Visits since 1 Aug 2000: [Site Meter]

* 30 Jul: I added pages about the Virgo II Groups, the Leo II Groups, and the Virgo III Groups.
* 16 Jul: I added pages about the Virgo Cluster, the Ursa Major Groups, and the Fornax Cluster.


Is this just more wishful thinking or did I find real astronomy?

The Universe


* The Sloan Digital Sky Survey aims to plot the positions of a million galaxies out to several billion light years.
* The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey has plotted the positions of 250 000 galaxies in two directions to about 3.5 billion light years.


He Gives these two links for the above

http://www.sdss.org/

AND

http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS/

Is there an up-to-date site that has a "real" map of the universe?
If mankind can percieve 14bly out from Earth wouldn't that make the known universe 28 bly wide? Some other maps I've seen picture the universe like a skwashed ball. (you like how I spelled squashed) :D

http://www.maths.bris.ac.uk/~maadb/research/topics/nd/s3foliation/

This next one is complicated
Shape of Universe (http://www.objectssearch.com/pedia/get.jsp?page=/wiki/Universe#Shape_of_the_Universe)

I have also heard of the universe being a....torus?

A Thousand Pardons
2004-Sep-20, 10:43 AM
I have also heard of the universe being a....torus?
Not sure, lot of stuff there, but I seem to remember that some people think it's a scorpio

skwirlinator
2004-Sep-20, 11:01 AM
:lol: I get it lol

Spaceman Spiff
2004-Sep-20, 02:40 PM
I really like the site on this url and I was wondering how accurate the information is.


This web page is designed to give everyone an idea of what our universe actually looks like. There are nine main maps on this web page, each one approximately ten times the scale of the previous one. The first map shows the nearest stars and then the other maps slowly expand out until we have reached the scale of the entire visible universe.


http://www.anzwers.org/free/universe/



This map attempts to show the entire visible Universe. The galaxies in the universe tend to collect into vast sheets and superclusters of galaxies surrounding large voids giving the universe a cellular appearance. Because light in the universe only travels at a fixed speed, we see objects at the edge of the universe when it was very young up to 14 billion years ago.



* Number of superclusters in the visible universe = 10 million
* Number of galaxy groups in the visible universe = 25 billion
* Number of large galaxies in the visible universe = 350 billion
* Number of dwarf galaxies in the visible universe = 3500 billion
* Number of stars in the visible universe = 30 billion trillion

http://www.anzwers.org/free/universe/universe.html



The information presented in this set of pages represents well the current state of knowledge about the structure of the observable universe. Only the last view (http://www.anzwers.org/free/universe/universe.html) is largely speculative (and in fact, as presented, is likely not possible). With the 2dF (now complete) and especially SDSS (about half complete) galaxy surveys, our census of galaxies out to 1 billion light years (http://www.anzwers.org/free/universe/superc.html) will be in fine shape, with the exception of the dwarf galaxies which are difficult to spot at great distances due to their low luminosities and surface brightnesses. The numbers of dwarf galaxies at great distances are largely (but not exclusively) based on extrapolations of their relative number in the "local" universe.

There is a growing body of evidence that galaxies in all of their characteristics (stellar populations, star formation rates, sizes, mophologies, etc) have been evolving over time. Even the clustering of galaxies has apparently changed. For example, the hierarchy known as "superclusters" (the largest structure within known universe) is apparently a relatively recent phenomenon. Thus, looking very far away means looking far enough back into time that the universe looks very different than it does now. If what I've just described continues to hold up to observational scrutiny, then we will not observe superclusters upon superclusters of galaxies out to the lookback limit, as shown in that last view (http://www.anzwers.org/free/universe/universe.html).

Russ
2004-Sep-20, 03:11 PM
Not to be picking nits but..... you left "All Of THe Above" off your list of options. :)

skwirlinator
2004-Dec-20, 10:31 AM
Not to be picking nits but..... you left "All Of THe Above" off your list of options. :)

LOL I guess I did! We will just chock your observation up to a vote for all of the above then! LoL

Good eye, You an astronomer or something?