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View Full Version : The thickness of Venus' surface atmosphere, how thick is it?



potoole
2012-Jun-13, 12:42 AM
If an astonaut was protected by proper space gear (protective apparal), How would the heavy atmosphere feel as he/she moved along the surface? Would it be similar to moving underwater, in deep diving gear, here on earth? :confused:

Thank you,
Patrick

cjameshuff
2012-Jun-13, 01:36 AM
If an astonaut was protected by proper space gear (protective apparal), How would the heavy atmosphere feel as he/she moved along the surface? Would it be similar to moving underwater, in deep diving gear, here on earth? :confused:

It's nothing like water...about 1/15th the density, and a compressible gas with no hydrogen bonds...likely 10-100 times less viscous. At about 60 times the density of air, drag would be about 60 times as strong as in Earth's atmosphere. In a protective suit, you probably wouldn't be moving fast enough to notice.

potoole
2012-Jun-13, 04:24 AM
Would one sense a thickness in the atmosphere?

Thanks for the answer,
Patrick

potoole
2012-Jun-13, 08:20 AM
Asking too many questions, I presume.

Jeff Root
2012-Jun-13, 12:31 PM
No, the questions are fine. You just need people to come
along who can answer them.

The answer that cjameshuff gave was close to what I would
have guessed, but I could only have guessed without doing
some research.

Certainly if you drop a light object you would notice its
lower terminal speed due to the greater air density.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

NEOWatcher
2012-Jun-13, 02:29 PM
I was thinking if we can equate it with some kind of foam like soap bubbles or fire fighting foam or something like that.
I tried googling to see if I can get any kind of clue about the various densities of various foams but came up empty handed.

I know elasticity would come into play, but as a rough "feel" for what it would be, maybe someone can come up with something.

potoole
2012-Jun-13, 09:55 PM
Thanks for the answers. :)

Patrick