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View Full Version : Was Earth a "single-biome" planet at one point?



PlutonianEmpire
2012-Jun-28, 12:12 AM
While it most certainly was at one point or two in the past four and a half billion years, for the purposes of this question, I mean it to be in the past half billion years or so when Earth had full scale ecologies, instead of just single cell life like the four billion years prior to that.

The reason for this question is that I read somewhere that at one point, all the Earth's land was covered in tropical jungles, with the average temperature being significantly hotter, and a whole lot more humid, an event which allegedly is what created most of the world's fossil fuels. Is there any truth to that?

Of course, technically speaking, since we have oceans, Earth would've been more of a "dual-biome" planet, is my guess.

So, might Earth have been a single-/dual-biome planet in the times since the Cambrian explosion?

Ara Pacis
2012-Jun-28, 05:14 PM
I think the Earth had mountains back then too, possibly even rivers and lakes.

PlutonianEmpire
2012-Jun-28, 11:56 PM
That's true, I forgot to take them into account. :lol:

BigDon
2012-Jun-29, 10:14 PM
The closest to what you are thinking about occured "soon" after the K-T extinction event.

Plants took time to adapt to the fact that the dinosaurs were gone and so maintained their pre-extinction growth rates dispite no more large grazers for several million years. Inertia, go figure.

So for first five to seven million years post dino-holocaust, the Earth was covered in pretty much a global forest.

Then mammals started to increase in size and make a difference.

PlutonianEmpire
2012-Jun-29, 10:31 PM
The closest to what you are thinking about occured "soon" after the K-T extinction event.

Plants took time to adapt to the fact that the dinosaurs were gone and so maintained their pre-extinction growth rates dispite no more large grazers for several million years. Inertia, go figure.

So for first five to seven million years post dino-holocaust, the Earth was covered in pretty much a global forest.

Then mammals started to increase in size and make a difference.
Maybe similar such plant re-growth occurred after other extinction events too?

BigDon
2012-Jun-30, 12:44 AM
Maybe similar such plant re-growth occurred after other extinction events too?

It would seem that the situation would have to be set up with a similar ecology beforehand