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Paul Beardsley
2012-Jul-20, 08:21 PM
...even though it probably shouldn't.

The way escalator handles more slightly faster than the bit you stand on.

Once, back in the days of VHS video, Clare and I were watching an episode of Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased). The phone rang (or perhaps it was the doorbell) so I pressed the Rewind to go back a few seconds before pressing Stop. It so happened that a car had just come over a hill into view. When I pressed rewind, the car went into reverse and backed rapidly out of sight. Clare giggled.

I'll think of more. Probably.

Gillianren
2012-Jul-20, 08:55 PM
The Reduced Shakespeare Company's Hamlet quotes the line "a couch for incest."

In their version, one of the guys follows that with, "Insects!"

And the third says, "A couch!"

I laugh every time. More than it deserves.

redshifter
2012-Jul-20, 11:31 PM
When I come home from work in the PM and the children that live on our little street have drawn all over it with 'sidewalk chalk'. I always get a kick out of that.

publiusr
2012-Jul-21, 04:46 PM
I'm all the time picking up those same rocks from the street--because--kids being kids--they'll be through my window the next chance.

Gillianren
2012-Jul-21, 05:31 PM
I wouldn't say that's kids being kids. I never threw anything through someone's window, and neither did any kid I know.

Hornblower
2012-Jul-21, 06:12 PM
I was more than amused once while participating in a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The first salute cannon fired a fraction of a second after a nearby spectator audibly passed some gas. I nearly split a gut trying not to laugh while standing at attention. I think my uniform stayed at attention, but I was wiggling and jiggling inside it.

Buttercup
2012-Jul-21, 06:26 PM
Gonk Droid at Twitter.

Posts "Gonk" absolutely randomly, lol! Only that -- "Gonk".

KaiYeves
2012-Jul-23, 02:18 PM
I have to write letters in response to letters my office recieves, and it amuses me greatly when the letter-writers have given or surnames that make me think of space or astronomy. (Example, a letter I read this morning from a woman named "Marietta".)

Jim
2012-Jul-23, 04:42 PM
My dog. Every night I take him outside to do his business before coming back in and bedding down. I stand by the door and call him. He gets up from the floor, walks across the room, then stops and goes back to his water dish, where he happily laps away while I wait and wait and wait.

I used to think only children pulled that stunt.

weatherc
2012-Jul-23, 05:32 PM
When I'm inside an elevator, I like to stand with my nose inches from the doors. This really freaks out the people that try to push their way into an elevator without letting people leave it first.

weatherc
2012-Jul-23, 05:35 PM
When I'm stuck in heavy traffic, I always chuckle when I pass the guy that's been weaving in and out of traffic while thinking he's getting somewhere faster. And then I chuckle when I pass him again a mile or two later. And then again a mile or two after that...

Paul Beardsley
2012-Jul-23, 05:49 PM
When I get my students to give me a question in English, I write it on the board but put a full stop instead of a question mark, e.g. "Does Susan drive a car." I then ask them, "What's the mistake?" They come out with, "Does Susan drives" and "Do Susan drive" and so on. When I eventually tell them they groan, especially if I've done that one to them before. I have one student who is wise to it now.

DonM435
2012-Jul-24, 05:22 PM
When I get my students to give me a question in English, I write it on the board but put a full stop instead of a question mark, e.g. "Does Susan drive a car." I then ask them, "What's the mistake?" They come out with, "Does Susan drives" and "Do Susan drive" and so on. When I eventually tell them they groan, especially if I've done that one to them before. I have one student who is wise to it now.

That reminds me of a gripe that I have with the MS Word grammar-checker. If you choose an unusual word order, it is fooled into thinking a declaration should be a question. I.e., you write "Thus did she make her memorable appearance," and it seizes upon the "did" and wants to add a question mark.

schlaugh
2012-Jul-24, 06:17 PM
Even after a bajillion flights as a passenger, I still get a kick out of take-off.

Gemini
2012-Jul-24, 06:48 PM
I always enjoy seeing the Saturn V and Saturn I on the way to and from my university.

Noclevername
2012-Jul-24, 11:06 PM
I was putting my food points on the weght watchers website, and I accidentally typed "snadwiches" instead of "sandwiches". For some reason that made me chuckle.

starcanuck64
2012-Jul-24, 11:46 PM
I don't know if you'd call it trivial but kids on the bus make me smile. It's an amusement ride for the younger ones and it's fun to watch them enjoying themselves.

Solfe
2012-Jul-25, 02:55 AM
I love the way my kids crack up when they see something go "wrong". My daughter called me Mom this morning and I replied "No, George, I'm Dad."

I love the way my younger son is so observant AND honest: "Dad, if you didn't have that little bit of hair... um... right here, you would be completely bald."

I love making the perfect airplane. (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/117284-More-true-life-comedy!?)

Gillianren
2012-Jul-25, 05:54 PM
There is Something very interesting outside our back porch. I didn't see it when I looked, but the cats are fascinated. I took a peek over Malcolm's head, and he glanced up at me and went back to staring. Given how skittish he is, it must be something very interesting indeed.

Trebuchet
2012-Jul-25, 06:15 PM
I sometimes think cats stare at nothing just to bug us!

Torsten
2012-Jul-26, 05:32 AM
I love making the perfect airplane. (http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/117284-More-true-life-comedy!?)

I liked that story. I should have said so at the time.

Today I was on one of the ferries from the BC mainland to Vancouver Island. The best seats on one of the decks are at the bow, and they have a fantastic view. They are arranged in rows, and groups of people who want to sit together will often place items on them to ensure their spot is kept if they head off for a stroll. I'd spent most of the trip on the top sundeck, since the weather was so nice, but at one point I went for a walk around the vessel and in this area at the bow I spotted a whole row of empty seats. "Great", I thought, "I'm going to park myself on one of those for a while." And then I noticed that the whole row was "reserved" with a single chocolate bar or other snack placed on each seat. I laughed out loud. "Must be kids."

Trebuchet
2012-Jul-26, 02:52 PM
Auugh! Add that to the list of trivial things that bug me: People "reserving" seats in public places while not actually occupying them. I'd have been tempted to eat the candy bars and sit down.

Gillianren
2012-Jul-26, 06:32 PM
Whenever there's a parade in Olympia (or Tumwater), there are people who will leave lawn chairs and things on a patch of sidewalk starting the day before to "reserve" their place. With no one in them. Just you try that for parades Back Home--someone would steal your lawn chair, and someone else will sit in your spot after they've done it. Or else they'll just sit in your lawn chair and point out that reserving pieces of sidewalk for a parade isn't a thing unless you're in it.

Noclevername
2012-Jul-26, 06:43 PM
It amuses me when people mix up the "Stuff That Bugs You" thread with the "Stuff That Amuses You" thread. ; )

Siguy
2012-Jul-26, 07:42 PM
The thermostats in my house are the iconic round Honeywell-type. I love how, by adjusting the temperature, you're actually adjusting the angle of a coiled metal spring. The spring expands and contracts, and when it becomes too cold, it tilts a little glass vial of mercury with two electrical contacts in it, so that mercury closes the circuit and the heater turns on. It's a very clever little mechanism, I think.

Also, the fact that every smoke detector in my house, and almost every house, contains an entirely man made radioactive element is pretty fascinating to me.

Sometimes I'll flick a bic lighter really quick, and watch little rings of smoke ascend from it. I find it sufficiently amusing to watch. As well as lighting matches, often two or three at the same time.

Gillianren
2012-Jul-26, 07:43 PM
It amuses me when people mix up the "Stuff That Bugs You" thread with the "Stuff That Amuses You" thread. ; )

The chair thing amuses me almost as much as it bugs me.

Torsten
2012-Jul-26, 08:10 PM
The chair thing amuses me almost as much as it bugs me.

I was in a really good mood (after recovering from a few days of illness) and found it amusing. Just something about using snacks - and the fact that no one took them - made me smile.

Buttercup
2012-Jul-26, 08:25 PM
Misogynists. All of them (I'm certain) would have dozens of wives and concubines ala the patriarchs of the Old Testament, if allowed. :-p

KaiYeves
2012-Jul-26, 08:27 PM
Oh, and this just happened...

Caller: "Hello, I would like to speak to (person in our office.)"
Me: "Sure. Who may I ask is calling?"
Caller: "Arthur Clark."
Me: "I bet you hear a lot of science fiction jokes."
Caller: "I do."
Me: "Okay, I'll go get her."

Paul Beardsley
2012-Jul-26, 08:34 PM
Hmm. I would have resisted. Not only will poor Arthur Clark have heard a lot of science fiction jokes, he will have heard a lot of comments that begin with "I bet you hear a lot of science fiction jokes."

Oh who am I kidding. I would not have resisted, but I would at least have felt a bit bad about it afterwards.

I do remember working in a team when we were joined by someone from another department called Ian Curtis. I said, "Oh, as in..." and he said, "Yeah yeah, I faked my death after recording Love Will Tear Us Apart." The funny thing is, I wasn't really a Joy Division fan until later. I'd have been much more amused then.

Trebuchet
2012-Jul-26, 11:05 PM
<nitpick> That's Clarke. </nitpick>

Noclevername
2012-Jul-26, 11:12 PM
<nitpick> That's Clarke. </nitpick>

No, that's the other guy. ;)

KaiYeves
2012-Jul-27, 02:28 AM
<nitpick> That's Clarke. </nitpick>

I know the writer was Arthur Clarke, the guy who called our office didn't spell it that way, though.

Solfe
2012-Jul-27, 02:32 AM
Misogynists. All of them (I'm certain) would have dozens of wives and concubines ala the patriarchs of the Old Testament, if allowed. :-p

Do you have any idea of how expensive that would be? I saw a formula for that some place. http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/icons/icon12.png

Van Rijn
2012-Jul-27, 09:43 AM
The thermostats in my house are the iconic round Honeywell-type. I love how, by adjusting the temperature, you're actually adjusting the angle of a coiled metal spring. The spring expands and contracts, and when it becomes too cold, it tilts a little glass vial of mercury with two electrical contacts in it, so that mercury closes the circuit and the heater turns on. It's a very clever little mechanism, I think.

Back in the '70s, I replaced just about all of the mechanical light switches in the family home at the time with silent mercury switches.

Jim
2012-Jul-27, 12:07 PM
It amuses me when people mix up the "Stuff That Bugs You" thread with the "Stuff That Amuses You" thread. ; )

Does it really amuse you, or does it bug you?

Jim
2012-Jul-27, 12:10 PM
Oh, and this just happened...

Caller: "Hello, I would like to speak to (person in our office.)"
Me: "Sure. Who may I ask is calling?"
Caller: "Arthur Clark."
Me: "I bet you hear a lot of science fiction jokes."
Caller: "I do."
Me: "Okay, I'll go get her."

One of my projects just got a new scheduler, last name Tribble.

I told him I'd avoid making any Star Trek references and he thanked me.

LookingSkyward
2012-Jul-27, 12:11 PM
Bugs are amusing... If developers did clean work I wouldn't have a job!


(Systems Operations Engineer)

SeanF
2012-Jul-27, 01:17 PM
One of my projects just got a new scheduler, last name Tribble.

I told him I'd avoid making any Star Trek references and he thanked me.
You said you'd avoid making any Star Trek references "after this one," right? <grin>

Speaking of names, when I was working for the city and doing some transcription, I once typed up a letter addressed to one Felipe Eduardo O'Brien. I found that name amusing.

LookingSkyward
2012-Jul-27, 01:21 PM
Once worked with a fellow with the last name of Gross. After we got to know each other, he asked that since I was a known smart-aleck, why I hadn't made a crack about his name.... I had to admit that I didn't think I was smart enough to come up with something he hadn't heard yet. Got a grin :>

Solfe
2012-Jul-27, 03:28 PM
I worked with three people with the initials CB, DC and DD.

One day, CB jumps out her seat and walks away saying "Some people... I have to walk away from this." It was a little out of character to say the least.

About 20 minutes later, DC hops out his chair raging. He received an email that clearly offended his email etiquette sensibilities. He was so angry, he could barely explain what the issue was. He was spluttering about "Idiots".

While DC is trying to explain the problem to me, DD fires off a steady stream of cuss words and calls someone on the phone.

The problem? A new employee received a chain email. The text of the email was something to the effect of "if x number of people forward this email to everyone they know, <insert famous person here> will pay a certain child's medical bills." This newbie tried to send this email to everyone in the company address book. The companies contact list was massive, so there was a safeguard in place to prevent this from happening by accident. She came up with a new plan and spent the entire morning selecting all of Aa names then the Ab names and so on, so the software wouldn't reject the email. She did the same for the B's, the C's, the D's, and by the time DD called her, she was working on the E's.

Later, DD and DC asked me how I dealt with such when I was in their position. I pointed out that my last name ended in V, it was unlikely that anything so foolish would ever get to me.

Siguy
2012-Jul-27, 05:02 PM
The fact that Being John Malkovich would likely have been Being Steve Buscemi had they been unable to get Malkovich for the role. A lot of things become amusing if you imagine Steve Buscemi in place of someone else.

Trebuchet
2012-Jul-27, 05:10 PM
Google's Doodle today is a very generic "Hurray for Sports" image. On the opening day of the London Olympics. I suspect they're making a subtle dig at the insane copyright protection the games have been doing. If so, good for them!

Buttercup
2012-Jul-27, 05:14 PM
The mayor of London yesterday, in an interview; holding/sloshing around a glass of water as if it were as interesting as anything he had to say. As if it were a prop.

Frankly I found the glass of water more interesting than him.

DonM435
2012-Jul-27, 06:09 PM
I know the writer was Arthur Clarke, the guy who called our office didn't spell it that way, though.

Isaac Asimov wrote that the first time he heard the term "Clark Orbit" he couldn't figure out for whom that was named. When it was explained as his well-known colleague Arthur, he responded "No fair! You didn't pronounce the silent 'e' in his name!"

Gillianren
2012-Jul-27, 07:20 PM
Graham's last name is Berry. As you can imagine, he has suffered through a lot of food-related jokes in his life. The only one which I've been around for which was ever funny was our coworker who decided that Graham needs his own breakfast cereal: Graham Berry's Berry Grahams. In and of itself, not funny. The coworker demonstrating what the trading cards would look like? Hilarious. They were all essentially the same; it was Graham giving the camera a thumbs-up and a big, cheesy grin. "Graham drawing a picture" was one hand holding a pen while the other did the thumbs-up gesture. "Graham answers a call," similar. "Graham poses for trading card picture," both thumbs up. Things got very weird on the call floor after all the highers-up in the company went home for the day.

Trebuchet
2012-Jul-27, 08:13 PM
When I got drafted, two of the Drill Instructors were Sgt Lilly and Sgt Berry. A fruit and a flower. Which they decidedly were not!

swampyankee
2012-Jul-28, 02:35 PM
The way my dog loves to go swimming. She pulls me to a spot of shore which is not beach and walks in until she floats and then just swims back and forth, parallel to shore.

Solfe
2012-Jul-30, 02:51 AM
Austin is back at his grandmother's for the summer. Now it appears he can make his own airplanes.

This isn't exactly trivial, but funny none the less.

When I was in my mid-teens, my sister gave me a very average looking hamster. In my mid twenties, the hamster got sick so I took him to the vet. The vet told me he was doomed, they simply don't live that long. Or course, the hamster passed away within a few days.

I called my sister in Toronto to let her know my pet died. She was very fond of him for some reason. In response, she asked about my room mate. Perplexed, I answered "he's away with the national guard." She told me it was my room mates fault, she and my friends had been replacing the hamster for years.

Tobin Dax
2012-Jul-30, 06:53 AM
Solfe, that's awesome.

LookingSkyward
2012-Jul-30, 07:34 AM
Agree with awesome - immortal hamster!

DonM435
2012-Jul-30, 01:36 PM
There was this fellow I worked with back circa 1980, a fellow computer programmer. But he was eccentric, whereas I'm not, of course.

He had these reference notes for our system clipped into a black, three-ring binder on his desk, and referred to it often. What I found odd was that there was a neatly-printed label stuck on the cover that bore one word: "Front".

He explained: "Well, the book looks the same front and back, and I got tired of picking it up and opening it and finding it was upside down, so I labeled the front."

I suspect that most of us would have done one of the following things:

(1) Industrious solution. As you're going to take the trouble to type or print a label that says "Front," go the extra distance and put the title of the bloody book on there.

(2) Lazy solution: As you only need to identify the front side, well then, stick any old thing at all (odd piece of tape, postage stamp, blank label) on there and be done with it.

(3) Real Lazy solution: Do nothing at all. (So the universe is unfair. You have a 50% chance of getting the right side up, and therefore a 75% chance of getting the wrong side, according to Murphy’s Law. Live with it.)

(A really dumb solution might be to put a "Front" sticker on one side and a "Back" sticker on the other -- please get them correct! That would be dumb because you'd not only have to note the sticker, but take the time to read it as well.)

But how many of you would prepare a label that just says "Front"? I don't know, maybe he had a whole sheet of "Front" labels to cope with similar situations.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Jul-30, 02:03 PM
I think the described solution is a perfectly logical way of fixing a minor otherwise repeated annoyance and at the same time an indication that he was in possession of that most undervalued but indispensable virtue of a programmer, laziness..

swampyankee
2012-Jul-30, 02:13 PM
Austin is back at his grandmother's for the summer. Now it appears he can make his own airplanes.

Is he in Texas?



This isn't exactly trivial, but funny none the less.

When I was in my mid-teens, my sister gave me a very average looking hamster. In my mid twenties, the hamster got sick so I took him to the vet. The vet told me he was doomed, they simply don't live that long. Or course, the hamster passed away within a few days.

I called my sister in Toronto to let her know my pet died. She was very fond of him for some reason. In response, she asked about my room mate. Perplexed, I answered "he's away with the national guard." She told me it was my room mates fault, she and my friends had been replacing the hamster for years.

I told the story to one of my daughters. She had a very odd expression when she said "that's awful" about the hamster exchange program.

Jim
2012-Jul-30, 02:16 PM
There was this fellow I worked with back circa 1980, a fellow computer programmer. But he was eccentric ...

Ah, Unix.

Trebuchet
2012-Jul-30, 02:33 PM
He had these reference notes for our system clipped into a black, three-ring binder on his desk, and referred to it often. What I found odd was that there was a neatly-printed label stuck on the cover that bore one word: "Front".

I'm afraid I'd have been sorely tempted to print out another "Front" label and stick it on the back.

swampyankee
2012-Jul-30, 03:04 PM
I'm afraid I'd have been sorely tempted to print out another "Front" label and stick it on the back.

I think I'd just remove his "Front" label and replace it upside-down.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Jul-30, 03:21 PM
Agree with awesome - immortal hamster!

I don't normally say "awesome" but... thirded!

DonM435
2012-Jul-30, 03:27 PM
Ah, Unix.

We didn't do much Unix in those days. We were supposed to manage data bases via Cobol extensions. This guy could write in Assembler code for the IBM 360 without thinking about it too hard.

swampyankee
2012-Jul-30, 03:46 PM
Do you have any idea of how expensive that would be? I saw a formula for that some place. http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/icons/icon12.png

It's easy. You just make sure that you take everybody else's money. How do you think monarchy and nobility got started?

DonM435
2012-Jul-30, 03:56 PM
I think I'd just remove his "Front" label and replace it upside-down.

I guess the most subtle change would be the nastiest.

Several years ago, one woman in our office took a three-week vacation, something that gave the pranksters nearby a lot of time.

What they did was to introduce very subtle changes to her desk and surroundings. Swap some books on the shelves. Reproduce her desk blotter down to the last doodle or scrawl carefully, but with small differences. Rewrite the various sticky notes. Type up new copies of lists she'd tacked up, but not quite the same. They even replaced the photograph of her dog with one of a similar mutt.

It was a really brilliant gag (they did store the original stuff safely), but I never did learn how itr played out when she got back.

Noclevername
2012-Aug-02, 12:28 AM
Really trivial-- night before last I was up late and went on to BAUT, just as I hit "refresh" the clock ticked from 11:59 to 12:00, and all the "today" last-posting times turned into "yesterday" all at once.

Siguy
2012-Aug-02, 04:08 AM
The Feynman point (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feynman_point). It's a mind-boggling yet trivial coincidence, but the idea of Feynman using it to convince people that pi is rational is just endlessly amusing. And the fact that that the digits which follow make up the infinitesimally small difference between pi and a rational number.

It's also true that all decimal places of pi, after the first couple dozen or so, are themselves quite trivial, as the number of digits stored within your calculator are probably enough for any engineer on Earth.

Lurking Nerd
2012-Aug-02, 06:26 PM
Killing the crosswalk button. Some of the buttons you press at a crosswalk to get the walk light make a beep to let you know it has been pressed. I've found that if I press them quickly, several times, the beep gets quieter and then complete ends with a little squel. Don't know why but making it beep several times and die just amuses me.

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-02, 06:41 PM
If I was designing the crosswalk system, I'd probably be tempted to set it up so every push after the first extends the interval before the light changes.

Swift
2012-Aug-02, 07:14 PM
I'm afraid I'd have been sorely tempted to print out another "Front" label and stick it on the back.
At a place I worked at we had a large set of metal shelves we stored our samples on. They were all put in these small white boxes, and the ends of the boxes were labeled with the sample number(s).

Our boss, Bob, always seemed to have a terrible time finding any sample he was looking for, even though you just had to look for the number, and they were pretty much in order. One day, on a lark, a co-worker, Ed, and I picked one of the sample boxes and put a post-it note on it saying "Bob, this is the one you want".

A couple of weeks later, Bob was looking for a sample and asked us to help him find it. Sure enough, it was the box we had put the note on. We were almost hysterical with laughter.

Ed also one day purchased this huge bag of plastic toy ants, just about the size of real ants. He would secretly put little piles of these ants all over the place (desk draws, on top of equipment, behind things, etc., etc.). For years after Ed left the company we would still occasionally find his little piles of ants.

Swift
2012-Aug-02, 07:20 PM
I guess the most subtle change would be the nastiest.

Several years ago, one woman in our office took a three-week vacation, something that gave the pranksters nearby a lot of time.

What they did was to introduce very subtle changes to her desk and surroundings. Swap some books on the shelves. Reproduce her desk blotter down to the last doodle or scrawl carefully, but with small differences. Rewrite the various sticky notes. Type up new copies of lists she'd tacked up, but not quite the same. They even replaced the photograph of her dog with one of a similar mutt.

It was a really brilliant gag (they did store the original stuff safely), but I never did learn how itr played out when she got back.
I found this website (http://www.weirdomatic.com/funny-office-pranks.html) devoted to photos of office and cubicle pranks, including wrapping everything (aluminum foil, wrapping paper, etc.) and filling cubicles with things (styrofoam packing, balloons, etc.).

Gillianren
2012-Aug-02, 08:32 PM
If I was designing the crosswalk system, I'd probably be tempted to set it up so every push after the first extends the interval before the light changes.

When I was a kid, the crosswalks in my neighbourhood only triggered walk lights if you pressed the button at very specific times. I got in the habit of pushing the button too many times in the hopes of getting it just right, and it's taken years to break myself of it.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Aug-02, 08:32 PM
I guess the most subtle change would be the nastiest.

Several years ago, one woman in our office took a three-week vacation, something that gave the pranksters nearby a lot of time.

What they did was to introduce very subtle changes to her desk and surroundings. Swap some books on the shelves. Reproduce her desk blotter down to the last doodle or scrawl carefully, but with small differences. Rewrite the various sticky notes. Type up new copies of lists she'd tacked up, but not quite the same. They even replaced the photograph of her dog with one of a similar mutt.

It was a really brilliant gag (they did store the original stuff safely), but I never did learn how itr played out when she got back.
Just hope she wasn't borderline psychotic, as that sounds like a perfect trigger.

swampyankee
2012-Aug-02, 08:42 PM
I found this website (http://www.weirdomatic.com/funny-office-pranks.html) devoted to photos of office and cubicle pranks, including wrapping everything (aluminum foil, wrapping paper, etc.) and filling cubicles with things (styrofoam packing, balloons, etc.).

One of the people I worked with wrapped his cubicle every Christmas. Were I to try that, I'd start using the wrapping paper to take notes.

Solfe
2012-Aug-02, 09:02 PM
I worked in an office that would upgrade computers every five or so years. If no one was sitting in a workstation, they would not update that computer. Often they would leave the old computer in place or remove it for recycling; it struck me that they tossed a coin to choose which to do.

My friend received a brand new computer with a tiny case about two week before the rest of us received an upgrade and he would rub it in every chance he got. To get even, I found a very old PC that was going to be recycled and took the case. I put my friends new computer inside the old case and ran the wires out the back. Then we waited to see his reaction.

After three days one of my coworkers commented on the old case and his lack of reaction. He shrugged and told us he liked it better this way, then he showed us how he taped the front plate like a hinge so he could press the power button on the computer inside.

Jim
2012-Aug-02, 10:54 PM
If I was designing the crosswalk system, I'd probably be tempted to set it up so every push after the first extends the interval before the light changes.

I saw a photo where someone obviously had an opinion about crosswalk buttons. Over the button was a neatly lettered sign that read, "REBOOT UNIVERSE."

iquestor
2012-Aug-03, 12:17 AM
We have a newscaster here named Richard Belcher. Every time they introduce him I flash back to the Eighth Grade; as my ScienceTeacher is calling role.
"Belcher?"
and he belches out " HHHHHHHHEEEEEEEeeeeerrrrrrrrreeee!!!"

I giggle every time.

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-03, 12:24 AM
When I was a kid, the crosswalks in my neighbourhood only triggered walk lights if you pressed the button at very specific times. I got in the habit of pushing the button too many times in the hopes of getting it just right, and it's taken years to break myself of it.

When I was on strike, a dozen or so years ago, my picket location was at a busy intersection which was the main entrance into the office part of the plant. Either there wasn't a button, or it didn't work. One of the guys brought in a large steel plate he'd toss on the traffic sensor coil to trigger the light when people wanted to cross, or just if he felt like stopping the traffic for a couple of minutes.

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-03, 02:17 AM
We have a newscaster here named Richard Belcher. Every time they introduce him I flash back to the Eighth Grade; as my ScienceTeacher is calling role.
"Belcher?"
and he belches out " HHHHHHHHEEEEEEEeeeeerrrrrrrrreeee!!!"

I giggle every time.
On my way to work, I walk past the office of a Congressman named Jerry Lewis, with that name on a plaque out front. It always makes me giggle.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-03, 02:50 PM
I can't believe nobody has mentioned this source of amusement. (Surely someone has somewhere?)

When looking up people's names in Wikipedia, Amazon or Google, I like to see how few letters I have to type before their name is suggested. This is especially amusing if it's someone I'm a fan of but who I don't think is well known outside a niche.

In Wikipedia I only have to type "H.P" to get H.P. Lovecraft, "Gary" to get Gary Numan.

Torsten
2012-Aug-03, 04:21 PM
Yes, that is a source of amusement. To help explain a phenomenon at work, I suggested that a friend might find both understanding and comic relief by googling "Dunning-Kruger". She said that the suggestion list showed it after typing the first four letters.

Gillianren
2012-Aug-03, 04:45 PM
It's especially fun to me if I'm looking up a person on Rotten Tomatoes. At first, when you start typing, it splits your choices between people and movies; it interests me to see how long it takes before it knows you want just a movie or just a person.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-04, 03:54 PM
Footnotes that generate further footnotes sometimes amuse me, sometimes bug me, depending what's demanded of me at the time and what mood I'm in.

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-05, 01:32 AM
I can't believe nobody has mentioned this source of amusement. (Surely someone has somewhere?)

When looking up people's names in Wikipedia, Amazon or Google, I like to see how few letters I have to type before their name is suggested. This is especially amusing if it's someone I'm a fan of but who I don't think is well known outside a niche.

In Wikipedia I only have to type "H.P" to get H.P. Lovecraft, "Gary" to get Gary Numan.
I like doing this, although sometimes Google alters it based on my previous searches so that what I'm looking for comes up sooner, which rather ruins the fun.

Gemini
2012-Aug-05, 02:39 AM
I did this one Friday night: Stand on the center of a bridge that goes over a railroad while a train goes by, it looks really surreal.

Solfe
2012-Aug-05, 03:05 AM
My children's reaction to water polo players with beards. They giggle like mad.

Jim
2012-Aug-05, 03:36 PM
Dogs drinking water. I find that endlessly amusing.

Hunting dogs usually have what are called "soft mouths" or "loose lips." This allows them to retrieve prey without damaging it. It also means they "leak" when they drink. Our Lab leaves a trail of water across the floor.

I also watch the dogs at the dog park. I bring a cooler filled with water and set it out for them. Some dogs are dainty drinkers. Others plunge their snouts into the water, mouths wide open, attacking it. Some put a paw into the cooler, I guess so it can't get away while they drink. Some put both paws in and "dig" in the water. I watched one shepherd with a tennis ball in his mouth, that he did not want to give up. He stood looking perplexed for a moment, then dropped the tennis ball into the cooler where it floated. He took his drink, then retrieved his ball, like dunking for apples.

Torsten
2012-Aug-06, 06:08 AM
I bring a cooler filled with water and set it out for them.

I both admire and am amused by this.

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-06, 12:03 PM
My kid's lab mix actually jumps in to the stock tank to drink. If the water is low enough, she lays down in it. I find it amusing... Our big lab, who has a nose the size of a coffee can (almost), will load his lips with about 4 gallons of water and slobber-dump on the cat (if she's not already on top of the bookshelf).

swampyankee
2012-Aug-06, 12:43 PM
That the forum software doesn't quote quotes when quoting posts.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-06, 12:59 PM
My kid's lab mix actually jumps in to the stock tank to drink. If the water is low enough, she lays down in it. I find it amusing... Our big lab, who has a nose the size of a coffee can (almost), will load his lips with about 4 gallons of water and slobber-dump on the cat (if she's not already on top of the bookshelf).

Wow, I had trouble parsing this!

I took "lab mix" to be "laboratory mix", even though that made no sense so I had to work out if "mix" was a typo for "minx" meaning cat... and once I'd worked that out, "Our big lab, who has a nose the size of a coffee can..." I thought, how big is a coffee? And what can he do?

Not making this up. But it all makes sense now.

Swift
2012-Aug-06, 01:03 PM
Wow, I had trouble parsing this!

I took "lab mix" to be "laboratory mix", even though that made no sense so I had to work out if "mix" was a typo for "minx" meaning cat... and once I'd worked that out, "Our big lab, who has a nose the size of a coffee can..." I thought, how big is a coffee? And what can he do?

Not making this up. But it all makes sense now.
I found the description of your confusion amusing. <smile>

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-06, 01:08 PM
LOL :>

SeanF
2012-Aug-06, 01:32 PM
I was breaking down a cardboard box this weekend for recycling, and noticed that the company had printed on the box, in big letters, "Congratulations, you are our 5000th customer, roughly"

DonM435
2012-Aug-06, 02:24 PM
Here’s a game that you can play almost anywhere when you’re hanging around with nothing to do.

Grab the nearest phone book. Access the “yellow pages.” You know how these are arranged, right? Alphabetically by subject, with guide words at the top of the page, referencing the first and last items on the page. Often it’s just one word if an entry goes on for many pages (e.g., “Hotels”).

The trick is just to look for the pages with two words. You ignore the hyphen and make a phrase out of the two words. Often it’ll be something boring, like “roofing sandblasting,” but a surprising amount of the time it’ll be something mildly amusing. It’s rare to find something really hilarious, but I’ve rarely been disappointed.

(Of course the range varies with the size of the book's coverage, but I've tried it in big cities and small towns, and it works.)

Some examples (I stopped halfway through):

YELLOW PAGES
BellSouth for Cocoa Beach/Cocoa Apr 2004-05
Advertising air
Alzheimer’s antiques
Asphalt assisted
Banquet bathroom
Beauty bibles
Billiard blood
Blood boat
Boat bowling
Cancer carpet
Child chiropractric
Chiropractic churches
Coffee computers
Cosmetics court
Credit crematories
Dock doors
Electric employee
Financial fire
Fire fishing
Floor florists
Furniture games
Glass golf
Income insulation
Investment janitors
Limousine liquor
Martial massage

DonM435
2012-Aug-06, 02:27 PM
When I was a kid, the crosswalks in my neighbourhood only triggered walk lights if you pressed the button at very specific times. I got in the habit of pushing the button too many times in the hopes of getting it just right, and it's taken years to break myself of it.

You are aware that the more times that you press the "up" or "down" button in the lobby, the faster the elevator will arrive to pick you up. As everybody's behavior seems to indicate that they believe this, it must be true, right?

Gillianren
2012-Aug-06, 03:02 PM
I both admire and am amused by this.

At faire, we set out a bowl in the front of the booth for dog water. This weekend, it was most appreciated.

Personally, I am both amused and annoyed by all the people we get who expect us to remember them from one year to the next--or further. "I bought a pin from you six years ago at the old site. [We're on our second site since then.] Remember me? Which one did I get? [There are hundreds of little pewter pins with sayings on them.]"

Swift
2012-Aug-06, 03:23 PM
Personally, I am both amused and annoyed by all the people we get who expect us to remember them from one year to the next--or further. "I bought a pin from you six years ago at the old site. [We're on our second site since then.] Remember me? Which one did I get? [There are hundreds of little pewter pins with sayings on them.]"
My wife and I had the opposite experience many years ago.

There is a local arts and craft festival called the Cain Park Art Festival. One year we were looking at one of the booths, a vendor who made these 4 to 6 foot totem poles out of styrofoam that we rather liked. He came up to us and did a big double-take; turned out that my wife looked a lot like his sister-in-law, and he thought it was her at first.

The following year we saw the same vendor and he did the exact same thing. He remembered we had come by the previous year, and said if he did the same double-take the next year, we'd get some big discount.

Of course, he didn't display the third year. <shrug>

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-06, 04:00 PM
At faire, we set out a bowl in the front of the booth for dog water. This weekend, it was most appreciated.

Personally, I am both amused and annoyed by all the people we get who expect us to remember them from one year to the next--or further. "I bought a pin from you six years ago at the old site. [We're on our second site since then.] Remember me? Which one did I get? [There are hundreds of little pewter pins with sayings on them.]"

Hey, I was able to walk into a booth after two years and one of the workers recognized me!

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-06, 04:21 PM
Advertising air [etc]

I am embarrased at how funny I found that list. I mean, come on, it isn't funny, and the fact that I laughed helplessly is not evidence to the contrary.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-06, 04:23 PM
Personally, I am both amused and annoyed by all the people we get who expect us to remember them from one year to the next--or further. "I bought a pin from you six years ago at the old site. [We're on our second site since then.] Remember me? Which one did I get? [There are hundreds of little pewter pins with sayings on them.]"

I remember going into a shop that sold cuddly toys. I wanted to get a new penguin for my wife Clare. I picked one up, and was about to pay for it when the assistant, a pleasant young woman, said, "She's already got that one." She was right, too.

DonM435
2012-Aug-06, 04:45 PM
I am embarrased at how funny I found that list. I mean, come on, it isn't funny, and the fact that I laughed helplessly is not evidence to the contrary.

It's surprising how often the phrase that you find works, to some extent. I suspect that the incidental alliteration provides some appeal that a list of random pairs of words would not.

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-06, 05:26 PM
Martial massage

I initial read that one as "marital massage". Oops!

Gillianren
2012-Aug-06, 05:52 PM
Hey, I was able to walk into a booth after two years and one of the workers recognized me!

It was the shirt, of course.

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-06, 06:51 PM
I am embarrased at how funny I found that list. I mean, come on, it isn't funny, and the fact that I laughed helplessly is not evidence to the contrary.
The mental images some of them produce ("Glass golf") are pretty funny to me.

Something that amuses me-- everybody at working asking if the temporary NASA insignia tattoo I put on my arm last night for the Curiosity landing was permanent... despite the fact that they have seen me in short sleeves multiple times before when it wasn't there.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-06, 07:54 PM
The mental images some of them produce ("Glass golf") are pretty funny to me.

Well yes, granted, but I've been killing myself laughing at things like "boat bowling", "investment janitors" and "dock doors". As in, I was trying to read them to my wife but was laughing too much to get it out. I mean, okay, the first two evoke amusing images, but why in the name of sanity am I finding "dock doors" funny???


Something that amuses me-- everybody at working asking if the temporary NASA insignia tattoo I put on my arm last night for the Curiosity landing was permanent... despite the fact that they have seen me in short sleeves multiple times before when it wasn't there.

They might think you had it done last night. Hmm, where can I get a temporary tattoo that looks permanent?

And how come "tattoo" more or less rhymes with "lasso" when the latter only has one O?

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-06, 08:04 PM
We got the Yellow Pages a few days ago. It was waiting to be put in the recyc bin (what do we need Yellow Pages for? this is the 21st century!) but I just grabbed it, brought it into the lounge, ripped the cover off, and started flicking through it.

Clare went, "Oh no!"

But it doesn't do that thing with the hyphens. I got excited for a moment when I saw "Microwave Ovens - Repairs" but then realised it's just a subset.

So I chucked it on the floor.

That's the most banal story I've told for a while.

Noclevername
2012-Aug-06, 08:09 PM
Something that amuses me-- everybody at working asking if the temporary NASA insignia tattoo I put on my arm last night for the Curiosity landing was permanent... despite the fact that they have seen me in short sleeves multiple times before when it wasn't there.

Maybe they thought you got it after some wild party last night.

Torsten
2012-Aug-06, 10:06 PM
And how come "tattoo" more or less rhymes with "lasso" when the latter only has one O?

Too, to, two? And the end of "moss", sounds like Chaos (http://ncf.idallen.com/english.html).

Jim
2012-Aug-07, 01:52 AM
And how come "tattoo" more or less rhymes with "lasso" when the latter only has one O?

'Cause you're pronouncing it wrong? It's "lass-oh," long O.

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-07, 02:26 AM
'Cause you're pronouncing it wrong? It's "lass-oh," long O.

Or "lariat".

Noclevername
2012-Aug-07, 01:12 PM
Or "rope".

Strange
2012-Aug-07, 01:19 PM
I wanted to get a new penguin for my wife

Not a phrase you hear every day.

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-07, 01:26 PM
Not a phrase you hear every day.heh... maybe you don't! THAT amuses me :>

ToSeek
2012-Aug-07, 02:37 PM
We got the Yellow Pages a few days ago. It was waiting to be put in the recyc bin (what do we need Yellow Pages for? this is the 21st century!) but I just grabbed it, brought it into the lounge, ripped the cover off, and started flicking through it.

Clare went, "Oh no!"

But it doesn't do that thing with the hyphens. I got excited for a moment when I saw "Microwave Ovens - Repairs" but then realised it's just a subset.

So I chucked it on the floor.

That's the most banal story I've told for a while.

There was great excitement in my home town when someone realized there was a page captioned "Lawyers - Lie".

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-07, 02:48 PM
There was great excitement in my home town when someone realized there was a page captioned "Lawyers - Lie". now that IS funny!

Swift
2012-Aug-07, 02:58 PM
Originally Posted by Paul Beardsley I wanted to get a new penguin for my wife
Not a phrase you hear every day.
LoL That amuses me.

I wonder if their old one, on top of the TV, exploded?

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-07, 03:07 PM
LoL That amuses me.

I wonder if their old one, on top of the TV, exploded?

I do have a t-shirt with a picture of a penguin on a TV; the penguin has an alarmed look as THAT announcement is made by the announcer:

http://www.penguin-place.com/apparel/monty-python-penguin-on-the-tele-t-shirt

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-07, 07:17 PM
I just returned from donating blood. They give you a rubber block to squeeze on and put it inside a surgical glove for sanitary purposes. About halfway through the draw I happened to look over at my hand and discovered that every time I squeezed, one finger of the glove would inflate with air and point out across the room. After two or three cycles I was cracking up and had to turn my head and attempt to think about something else.

While on the topic of giving blood: If you're able, please do it. My late mother owed the last 2-1/2 years of her life to transfusions at the rate of two units about every two weeks. That's around 130 units that some wonderful person donated. At one unit every eight weeks, it'll take me 20 years to make up for all that. I'm about five years in now and will keep it going as long as they'll have me.

Swift
2012-Aug-07, 07:58 PM
About halfway through the draw I happened to look over at my hand and discovered that every time I squeezed, one finger of the glove would inflate with air and point out across the room. After two or three cycles I was cracking up and had to turn my head and attempt to think about something else.

Hmmm... I wonder which finger it might have been..... ;)

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-07, 08:34 PM
Hmmm... I wonder which finger it might have been..... ;)

I was avoiding going there, but since you've brought it up...I couldn't really tell! I think it was probably the index finger, however.

Noclevername
2012-Aug-07, 08:40 PM
Maybe it was giving you a "thumbs up"!

HenrikOlsen
2012-Aug-07, 11:08 PM
Having donated some 28 times over the years, I agree with Trebuchet.
Those 3.7 gallons was the easiest way to help people I've yet found.
Had to stop when I started on hypertension drugs, they're not good for other people to get, so 28 times is all I get to do.

As for amusing things about it, I had a friendly competition with a friend to see who'd get to 25 first, after about 10 years we ended up donating our 25th portion less than a week apart.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-08, 05:13 AM
I agree with Trebuchet too, but whenever I donated I found I was very run down a day or too later, and ended up taking a day's sick leave each time. I explained this to the transfusion service people and they told me, quite nicely, that it might be best if I stopped donating.

Jim
2012-Aug-08, 12:03 PM
Our plant had regular blood drives and I almost always participated. One time, we had a summer hire in our Unit - a very charming and intelligent engineering student - who decided she wanted to donate. So she did.

And passed out afterward.

Scared the bejeebers out of us, but she was fine after a short nap.

NEOWatcher
2012-Aug-08, 12:07 PM
I got to about 8 gallons (over 60 pints) before I was forced to stop due to health issues.

At one point, I was called for a local drive and didn't think twice about the call because I was planning on donating anyway. When I got there, I was whisked in front of everyone else, and it was explained to me that my blood was going directly for pediatric use with a hint of what the patient was suffering from. (I wish I could remember). It really reinforced the idea of donating, especially knowing my O- is considered a universal donor.

DonM435
2012-Aug-08, 12:51 PM
There was great excitement in my home town when someone realized there was a page captioned "Lawyers - Lie".

I have to wonder who would advertise under "Lie."

Buttercup
2012-Aug-08, 01:14 PM
When little kids mispronounce proper names, like "Noomi" for "Snoopy" (the Peanuts character) -- my nephew, when he was little. Or they do spontaneous things like toddle past with a nap blanket draped over their heads (a friend's 1-1/2 year old son recently).

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-08, 01:19 PM
When my oldest was a toddler, we saw her try to sneak down the hall into the kitchen... When she spotted my wife and me she held up her blankie... like 'you can't see me, just my blankie out for a snack...' thanks for calling that to mind, Buttercup! And she called berries "Binjies"

ToSeek
2012-Aug-08, 02:27 PM
I have to wonder who would advertise under "Lie."

Lie Detectors, as I recall.

ToSeek
2012-Aug-08, 02:31 PM
I just returned from donating blood. They give you a rubber block to squeeze on and put it inside a surgical glove for sanitary purposes. About halfway through the draw I happened to look over at my hand and discovered that every time I squeezed, one finger of the glove would inflate with air and point out across the room. After two or three cycles I was cracking up and had to turn my head and attempt to think about something else.

While on the topic of giving blood: If you're able, please do it. My late mother owed the last 2-1/2 years of her life to transfusions at the rate of two units about every two weeks. That's around 130 units that some wonderful person donated. At one unit every eight weeks, it'll take me 20 years to make up for all that. I'm about five years in now and will keep it going as long as they'll have me.

I used to give regularly until for some reason I tested positive for HIV. It was a false positive, but at the time they still didn't let you donate with that result. They finally relaxed the rule, and I started donating again, but then I had some problems with blood clots that put me on anticoagulants, and they don't want my blood any more. Think I put in four or five gallons before I had to stop.

Swift
2012-Aug-08, 02:40 PM
I donated regularly from about the age of 18 till around the age of 50; for most of that time 4 to 6 times a year, so I was in the multiple gallons range. They start rejecting me for occasional high blood pressure (why that would be grounds for rejection, I never understood). With my current schedule it is pretty hard for to carve out the time for it anyway, so I just kind of gave up. I'll now do it once in a great while if there is a particularly convenient one.

primummobile
2012-Aug-08, 02:45 PM
I've donated more or less regularly for the last twenty years. About ten years ago I was on a medication for about a year that raised my blood pressure and they wouldn't take my blood then. I think the rule about blood pressure is more to protect the donor rather than the blood supply.

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-08, 02:52 PM
When my oldest was a toddler, we saw her try to sneak down the hall into the kitchen... When she spotted my wife and me she held up her blankie... like 'you can't see me, just my blankie out for a snack...' thanks for calling that to mind, Buttercup! And she called berries "Binjies"

She obviously mistook you for The Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_races_and_species_in_The_Hitchhiker's_Guid e_to_the_Galaxy#Ravenous_Bugblatter_Beast_of_Traal )!

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-08, 02:55 PM
LOL!

Gillianren
2012-Aug-08, 04:02 PM
The bus only goes by our donation center every hour. When I'm without a car, as I am now, it's really inconvenient. And I am inclined, if I have missed the bus, to just start walking downtown--it's probably about a mile and a half to the transit center. There are other bus lines which have stops between downtown and the donation center, but I never think, "Oh, I'll walk six blocks and catch the 13 instead." It's always the whole walk, and I'm concerned about passing out, though I never have.

My sister did once, though. We were in high school, and they had a Halloween blood drive. It was her senior year, the first time she was eligible to donate. I was a freshman. People came running up to me to tell me that she'd passed out. She had dressed as a vampire that day . . . .

SeanF
2012-Aug-08, 07:58 PM
'Cause you're pronouncing it wrong? It's "lass-oh," long O.
I was going to make the same comment, but then I looked it up in the dictionary and found that apparently "lass-oo" is an accepted pronunciation. Who knew?

Buttercup
2012-Aug-09, 04:10 PM
Snarky: Patients who resist and resist having a necessary surgery (gangrene infection, ruptured cyst, etc.), only finally to go through with it after delaying and making it worse; who would, if it were cosmetic surgery, be knocking down the OR doors and flinging themselves onto the table.

And this applies to both genders.

Jim
2012-Aug-09, 06:08 PM
... apparently "lass-oo" is an accepted pronunciation. ...

Not where it matters, it's not.
:indignant smiley:

Swift
2012-Aug-09, 06:30 PM
Yeah...that was the "problem"...I can't make a "by hand" patty to save my life.
Not making fun of R.A.F. (I use the expression too), but ".... to save my life" is a funny expression. As if, in this example, somehow making a hamburger patty would save your life. "If only he had learned to make a patty, he might still be with us". Or like a madman would run up to you and demand you make a patty or he'd kill you. :D

ShinAce
2012-Aug-09, 07:28 PM
I always get a chuckle out of people who set their windshield wipers to all-out when heavy rain suddenly hits, and then ten minutes later when there isn't even a drop on the car, the wipers are still going. I've seen it dozens, maybe hundreds of times, and I still get that abdominal workout type laughter.

Buttercup
2012-Aug-09, 08:54 PM
Seems there's hardly any shoppers in the grocery store, until you go to checkout: Everyone else is there too, and quite a few! ;-)

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-09, 09:06 PM
Seeing how crazy the Internet has gone over MSL controller Bobak Ferdowsi's hairdo.

SeanF
2012-Aug-10, 12:03 AM
Not where it matters, it's not.
:indignant smiley:
Well, yes, there is that. ::laugh::

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-10, 08:53 AM
Watching my cat fall off the chair not paying attention, and trying to pretend she did it on purpose. That cracks me up :>

Jim
2012-Aug-10, 11:33 AM
Years ago I had two cats - Big Cat and Little Cat... yeah, no imagination - who loved chasing each other. One time LC was chasing BC around the house. BC ran into the living room, headed for the TV stand, jumped onto the cabinet, onto the TV, and onto the hinged top of a trash container. He promptly dropped out of sight.

There was no sound for a good 30 seconds. Just as I was starting to get worried, I heard a soft and plaintive "Mew" from inside the container. So I pulled him out.

LC - who had broken off the chase when BC made that first jump - just sat and watched.

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-10, 11:44 AM
Also long ago, and the cats are no longer with us…
3 cats, Kiri and the twins – couldn’t tell the twins apart at the speed of the story…

Kiri sleeping on the seat of the bentwood rocker… twins in a chase thru the house…
Twin one leaps and hits the back of the rocker, which goes about half way back and is just starting to come forward as twin 2 hits it.

The rocker goes all the way over, launching a very confused Kiri … apex at about 3 feet, and the look on her face was priceless… “I don’t remember launching into the aIIRRRRR!”…

Swift
2012-Aug-10, 12:47 PM
Watching my cat fall off the chair not paying attention, and trying to pretend she did it on purpose. That cracks me up :>
We had a cat, Doris, when I was growing up. I believe Doris was brain damaged, she was the only cat I've ever known that was a klutz. She would routinely run into walls and fall off of things. She liked to sleep on top of the TV, big old console with all the tubes inside was nice and warm when it was on. Only problem is that she would roll over in her sleep and crash to the floor, not waking up till she hit. She would look around a little dazed, jump back up on the set, and go back to sleep.

DonM435
2012-Aug-10, 12:53 PM
Seems there's hardly any shoppers in the grocery store, until you go to checkout: Everyone else is there too, and quite a few! ;-)

Mrs M. causes those pileups. Often I'm waiting in the front of the store for her to finish shopping, chatting idly with the decidedly un-busy cashiers. As she makes her slow path up the last aisle, pausing to consider things, everybody else in the store lines up ahead of her. Honest.

Noclevername
2012-Aug-10, 01:29 PM
Seeing how crazy the Internet has gone over MSL controller Bobak Ferdowsi's hairdo.

17394
McKayla is not impressed by his hair.

NEOWatcher
2012-Aug-10, 02:01 PM
McKayla is not impressed by his hair.
I thought it was Gabby with the hair controversy.

Noclevername
2012-Aug-11, 11:10 PM
Amusing: The "Site News And Administration" section just went to:

Threads: 0
Posts: 0

Last Post: Never

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-12, 06:16 AM
Not making fun of R.A.F. (I use the expression too), but ".... to save my life" is a funny expression. As if, in this example, somehow making a hamburger patty would save your life. "If only he had learned to make a patty, he might still be with us". Or like a madman would run up to you and demand you make a patty or he'd kill you. :D

I, too, use the expression sometimes, but it amuses me for a different reason.

Person A says, "I am not very good at playing the violin." Meaning he's had lessons but hasn't reached a high standard yet, or he simply doesn't have the aptitude. Person B responds with, "I couldn't play the violin to save my life." Meaning he's had few or no lessons, and has no aptitude, and so, naturally enough, he isn't very good. But the amusing part (IMO) is that he apparently believes that he ought to be able to play to a professional standard if his life were threatened.

Unnecessary second example:

Man with gun: "What are the names of the Galilean moons of Jupiter?"
Victim: "I have no idea. I've never studied astronomy."
Man with gun pulls back hammer with a loud click.
Victim: "Okay, okay! Er, Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto!"

Hornblower
2012-Aug-12, 12:59 PM
I was more than amused once while participating in a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The first salute cannon fired a fraction of a second after a nearby spectator audibly passed some gas. I nearly split a gut trying not to laugh while standing at attention. I think my uniform stayed at attention, but I was wiggling and jiggling inside it.

I just remembered a similar incident during an equally solemn occasion, a military funeral. We were just about to start playing a hymn as the casket bearers were carrying the deceased soldier's casket from the chapel to the horse-drawn caisson when one of the horses let a loud one. We somehow kept the music in tune and in tempo while shaking inside our uniforms.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-12, 02:33 PM
Not a flatulence story, but... Reminds me of a Christmas Carol service one year. I was sat next to my brother when the priest - who spoke good English but occasionally mumbled or slurred, announced the first carol: "We shall sing 'Awa[slur]in a Manger'."

My brother turned to me and said, "What's a whale doing in a manger?"

I had to restrain my laughter for the next hour and a bit.

DonM435
2012-Aug-12, 10:58 PM
"Away is the ranger" is another popular variant.

swampyankee
2012-Aug-13, 02:30 AM
My dog found a garter snake in my back yard. She didn't really do anything to it: she just barked, but then tried very hard to find it when it slithered into some hostas.

My parents' last dog, Henry, didn't bark at them. He just grabbed them and shook his head violently. Interestingly, he never seems to have bitten them hard enough to draw blood.

Noclevername
2012-Aug-13, 02:43 AM
A funny pic from Bad Astronomy, on alien life:
17404

It's almost Escher-esque.

Gillianren
2012-Aug-13, 03:46 PM
The dog in the booth next to ours at faire sounds exactly like he is saying, "Ruff! Ruff!" We have privately dubbed him Gaspode, after the talking dog in the Discworld books.

This year, we're exactly across from one of the stages. Most of the shows are pretty good; we've seen Robin Hood and Maid Marian three times a day for four days now. (While they have two different shows, the two shows have most of the same jokes.) We still enjoy them. But three times a day, there's this folk duet who are not very good and have a really bad set list. (Much though I may like Leonard Cohen, "Suzanne" is not appropriate for a ren faire.) Robin was kind of hanging around yesterday before one of his sets; I think they have shows on either side of this group. And the guy said that if Robin wasn't ready, they could do one more song. Robin told them very quickly that, no, he was ready.

swampyankee
2012-Aug-13, 05:51 PM
There was a song -- I can't remember who sung it or the song's title -- which always sounded to me like "there's a bathroom on the right." I thought that was an odd thing to sing about, but this was in the 60s....

NEOWatcher
2012-Aug-13, 05:57 PM
I can't remember who sung it or the song's title
Credence Clearwater Revival (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Moon_Rising_(song)).
It's probably one of the most known mondegreens in popular music.

Nicolas
2012-Aug-15, 01:40 PM
Our KiloPi tradition apparently went viral. I just read an article about how the USA passed 100.000.000 times pi citizens on august 14th.

DonM435
2012-Aug-15, 06:14 PM
Our KiloPi tradition apparently went viral. I just read an article about how the USA passed 100.000.000 times pi citizens on august 14th.

Therefore, if we all stood in one big circle, our diameter would be 100,000,000 people wide, eh?

NEOWatcher
2012-Aug-15, 06:57 PM
Therefore, if we all stood in one big circle, our diameter would be 100,000,000 people wide, eh?
Shhh. Don't give anybody any ideas. Next thing you know we'll get a whole fundraising effort and song (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hands_Across_America) to go with it.

Nicolas
2012-Aug-16, 07:09 AM
And don't forget a reference to the event in a Simpsons episode.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Aug-16, 10:03 AM
Therefore, if we all stood in one big circle, our diameter would be 100,000,000 people wide, eh?
No, the circle would be 5 times larger than the Equator, so standing like that is just plain not an option.)

DonM435
2012-Aug-16, 12:57 PM
No, the circle would be 5 times larger than the Equator, so standing like that is just plain not an option.)

Hey, it's a thought experiment! If Archimedes can say "Give me a place to stand, and I will move the Earth," then I can say "Give 314,159,265.4 of us a place to stand, and I will show you a 100 megaperson diameter line!"

Buttercup
2012-Aug-16, 04:42 PM
My sister, who wrote an e-mail (extremely rare for her, as she dislikes the internet; tends to be technophobic) praising "today's" technology ... and meanwhile she gets daily news from a newspaper.
:-]

Jim
2012-Aug-16, 05:15 PM
Hey, it's a thought experiment! If Archimedes can say "Give me a place to stand, and I will move the Earth," then I can say "Give 314,159,265.4 of us a place to stand, and I will show you a 100 megaperson diameter line!"

Let me know when you get a volunteer to be the .4.

NEOWatcher
2012-Aug-16, 05:54 PM
I get a chuckle every time I see the placement of the "(change)" link on nbc's main page.
17413
There's got to be some reason they didn't place it next to the location, and instead opted to put it next to the weather.

Gillianren
2012-Aug-16, 05:55 PM
See, if I had one of those that worked, my life would be very different.

It amuses me that the "things that bug you" thread is three times longer than the "things that amuse you" thread.

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-16, 07:35 PM
My sister, who wrote an e-mail (extremely rare for her, as she dislikes the internet; tends to be technophobic) praising "today's" technology ... and meanwhile she gets daily news from a newspaper.
:-]

Well, computers are only one kind of technology... reading about the Curiosity landing in the newspaper could definitely inspire praise of today's technology, for instance.

Nicolas
2012-Aug-17, 08:40 AM
Let me know when you get a volunteer to be the .4.

The average family has 2.4 children, so that shouldn't be a problem.

Solfe
2012-Aug-17, 03:14 PM
My son and his friends saw a Google Map's truck last year and chased it down on bicycles. They are in images for blocks around our house. :)

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-17, 04:06 PM
The hotel we're in thoughtfully provided "volumizing" shampoo. Didn't work, I'm still bald.

Swift
2012-Aug-17, 07:41 PM
The hotel we're in thoughtfully provided "volumizing" shampoo. Didn't work, I'm still bald.
Yes, but you have a bigger volume of nothing now. :whistle:

starcanuck64
2012-Aug-17, 09:36 PM
The advert on the side of a garbage truck I saw downtown today:

Garbage Removal 432-YUCK

Hornblower
2012-Aug-17, 10:35 PM
A sign at the entrance to a nearby military installation said "No weapons of any kind are authorized on this installation." Standing beside the sign was a guard clearly armed with a 9mm automatic pistol, and a combat-ready infantry regiment is stationed there with their rifles. A better choice of words would have been something like "No unauthorized weapons of any kind are permitted on this installation."

DonM435
2012-Aug-18, 01:57 AM
A sign at the entrance to a nearby military installation said "No weapons of any kind are authorized on this installation." Standing beside the sign was a guard clearly armed with a 9mm automatic pistol, and a combat-ready infantry regiment is stationed there with their rifles. A better choice of words would have been something like "No unauthorized weapons of any kind are permitted on this installation."

Supposedly, one of the players' dressing rooms at Brooklyn's Ebbetts Field used to have a sign that read VISITORS' CLUBHOUSE -- NO VISITORS ALLOWED.

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-18, 07:02 PM
A sign at the entrance to a nearby military installation said "No weapons of any kind are authorized on this installation." Standing beside the sign was a guard clearly armed with a 9mm automatic pistol, and a combat-ready infantry regiment is stationed there with their rifles. A better choice of words would have been something like "No unauthorized weapons of any kind are permitted on this installation."

When I see fences with "No Trespassing" signs on them and the house in question clearly visible behind the fence, I like to imagine a dumb person calling the police to report "It says you're not allowed to trespass there, but somebody's gone and built a HOUSE!"

starcanuck64
2012-Aug-18, 11:21 PM
Supposedly, one of the players' dressing rooms at Brooklyn's Ebbetts Field used to have a sign that read VISITORS' CLUBHOUSE -- NO VISITORS ALLOWED.

I know he was with the Mets and the Yankees but was Yogi Berra even with the Dodgers, he's famous for things like that.

DonM435
2012-Aug-20, 01:01 PM
Also, I remember an old university professor friend of mine. He was a big shot and has a reserved parking space. The sign there said "This parking space is RESERVED for Dr. ____ ____ ____. DO NOT PARK HERE!" [He had a title and three names on it, but of course.]

As this guy was fanatic about the English language, I pointed out to him that the sign should have read something like "... ONLY HE MAY PARK HERE!" but he claimed it wasn't his problem.

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-22, 01:46 PM
editing specks on my screen... twice tonight I've tried to delete different bits of 'punctuation'...

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-22, 05:12 PM
editing specks on my screen... twice tonight I've tried to delete different bits of 'punctuation'...

I have the same problem. It would probably be better if I didn't eat in front of the computer!

I also have a dead pixel on one of the computers. Even though I know it's there, I still get fooled and try to delete it now and then.

starcanuck64
2012-Aug-22, 10:27 PM
You want really trivial, I've got really trivial-

On the way through downtown I noticed a woman in a bright orange shirt coming towards me in the crosswalk. People tend to dress conservatively here and black seems the color of choice for many people so she stood out a bit. I then looked on the other side of the street and a there was a woman in that crosswalk with an almost identical shirt...

Buttercup
2012-Aug-24, 01:55 PM
The murderous craving I'm having right now for sausage gravy and biscuits. :o I am PHYSICALLY craving that!

starcanuck64
2012-Aug-24, 05:39 PM
I saw a guy that looked just like Wilford Brimley this morning...and a sign that had probably been tampered with overnight outside an asian restaurant that advertised "whole cat".

DonM435
2012-Aug-24, 07:00 PM
The bookstore here had a sign in the window offering MOBILE STATIONERY.

Now, I have no idea what that is.
But I was tempted to go in and say "This stationery is too mobile! I want some STATIONARY STATIONERY!"

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-24, 07:09 PM
The bookstore here had a sign in the window offering MOBILE STATIONERY.

Now, I have no idea what that is.
But I was tempted to go in and say "This stationery is too mobile! I want some STATIONARY STATIONERY!"

<Grin> I love English language-based jokes!

Buttercup
2012-Aug-24, 07:23 PM
The bookstore here had a sign in the window offering MOBILE STATIONERY.

Now, I have no idea what that is.
But I was tempted to go in and say "This stationery is too mobile! I want some STATIONARY STATIONERY!"

Lol!!! :)

Thanks -- needed that!

NEOWatcher
2012-Aug-24, 07:25 PM
But I was tempted to go in and...
See? It's catchy enough to make you go in and find out. It doesn't have to make sense as long as it works. That's advertising for you.

DoggerDan
2012-Aug-25, 04:06 AM
The bookstore here had a sign in the window offering MOBILE STATIONERY.

Nothing like [language] on wheels that's standing still.

Tensor
2012-Aug-25, 05:11 AM
Well, this is my 6,000th post. It's extremely trivial, but it does amuse me.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-25, 07:14 AM
Congratulations on your arbitrary achievement, Tensor!

I want to open an electronics store that sells transistors, diodes, capacitors, resistors and so on but not integrated circuits. It will cater to hobbyists who don't want to tell their spouses and family members about their hobby, so they will be given their components in plain brown paper bags, and receipts will be coded.

It will be called The Discreet Discrete Component Store.

Jim
2012-Aug-25, 04:25 PM
Well, this is my 6,000th post. It's extremely trivial, but it does amuse me.

Funny you say this. I just referenced this post in the Trivial Stuff That Bugs Me thread!

(Not really, but it was too good an opening...)

ToSeek
2012-Aug-25, 05:58 PM
The bookstore here had a sign in the window offering MOBILE STATIONERY.

Now, I have no idea what that is.
But I was tempted to go in and say "This stationery is too mobile! I want some STATIONARY STATIONERY!"

When I worked at the Applied Physics Lab, one of the official campus vehicles was marked "Stationary Engineer." I kept wanting to shout, "No, he's not!"

peteshimmon
2012-Aug-25, 08:21 PM
Notwithstanding. I have known this word for over
50 years and I still do not know what it means.
Marleys ghost used it!

But I will keep away from Google, ignorance
is bliss. Notwithstanding. Aww...

Swift
2012-Aug-25, 10:43 PM
When I worked at the Applied Physics Lab, one of the official campus vehicles was marked "Stationary Engineer." I kept wanting to shout, "No, he's not!"
Hey, I lot of math and engineering goes into a well crafted envelope and letterhead.

What do you mean "not that kind of stationery"?

:whistle:

swampyankee
2012-Aug-26, 12:48 AM
Congratulations on your arbitrary achievement, Tensor!

I want to open an electronics store that sells transistors, diodes, capacitors, resistors and so on but not integrated circuits. It will cater to hobbyists who don't want to tell their spouses and family members about their hobby, so they will be given their components in plain brown paper bags, and receipts will be coded.

It will be called The Discreet Discrete Component Store.

So, you're planning on selling segregated circuits?

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-26, 04:14 PM
I'm not going to lie, my first thought when I saw the Wikipedia entry for Cyberchase (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyberchase) saying that it taught "discrete mathematics" was "Really? I don't think anybody could watch that show and not realize it was teaching mathematics." (This is not a knock on the show, enjoyed it very much when I was the target age.)

Tensor
2012-Aug-27, 03:07 AM
Funny you say this. I just referenced this post in the Trivial Stuff That Bugs Me thread!

(Not really, but it was too good an opening...)


Heheheheheh, yeah, it is a good opening. I didn't think about it until after I posted but, I figured no one would notice. I should know better with the group here.

Torsten
2012-Aug-27, 05:50 AM
There was a numerologist a few years ago whose posting career here was cut short after his 666th post.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-27, 02:55 PM
There was a numerologist a few years ago whose posting career here was cut short after his 666th post.

Do you mean immediately after, or a large number of posts after?

publiusr
2012-Aug-27, 09:52 PM
For me, I seem to have developed an ability to clap my hands with such force at work so that the echo sounds like a gunshot.

Swift
2012-Aug-28, 01:57 AM
For me, I seem to have developed an ability to clap my hands with such force at work so that the echo sounds like a gunshot.
I wouldn't recommend trying that at an airport. ;)

Torsten
2012-Aug-28, 02:25 AM
Do you mean immediately after, or a large number of posts after?

Aha! That'll teach me for posting so late in the evening. I did mean "immediately", meaning the post count stopped at that number. At least that's how I remembered it. But much to my amusement, I see the post count is actually higher now. Perhaps PMs, in this case to moderators, can be made after banning and are added to the post count?

DonM435
2012-Aug-29, 03:37 AM
Have I mentioned that I used to see, somewhere in Cocoa Beach (FL), a sign that read:


OPTIMIST CLUB Parking Lot
Park at your own risk!

swampyankee
2012-Aug-29, 11:48 PM
Somewhere near Boston, there a sign that reads "I93N/Rt 128 S" (it may no longer exist, which will reduce confusion of anybody new to that area)

Swift
2012-Aug-30, 01:49 AM
Somewhere near Boston, there a sign that reads "I93N/Rt 128 S" (it may no longer exist, which will reduce confusion of anybody new to that area)
I remember from when I lived in New Orleans that there were parts of the "East Bank" of the Mississippi that were actually West of the "West Bank", because of the twists and turns of the river.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Aug-30, 07:30 AM
Somewhere near Boston, there a sign that reads "I93N/Rt 128 S" (it may no longer exist, which will reduce confusion of anybody new to that area)

What does that mean?

HenrikOlsen
2012-Aug-30, 10:43 AM
I'm guessing there's a bit of road where Interstate 93 northbound shares lane with Route 128 southbound.
At a guess it's a bit that goes roughly east/west.

swampyankee
2012-Aug-30, 12:20 PM
What does that mean?

In the US, convention is that a route's direction is determined by the dominant travel direction from one terminus to the other. I-93's southern end is in Canton, Massachusetts, which is near Boston, and it's northern terminus is in St Johnsbury, Vermont, which is about 200 miles north, near the Canadian border. If you get on I-93 in Canton, you're on northbound I-93 whatever direction a compass shows, as is anybody who merges into the same group of travel lanes as you are in your trip to St Johnsbury.

DonM435
2012-Aug-30, 12:48 PM
I once saw, in the extreme south edge of Chicago or a suburb (a bus terminal was there), a place where the signs for FIRST STREET and SECOND STREET were affixed at angles to the same post. I guess these roads were mostly parallel, but came together at this point. It sure looked odd.

Swift
2012-Aug-30, 01:09 PM
I once saw, in the extreme south edge of Chicago or a suburb (a bus terminal was there), a place where the signs for FIRST STREET and SECOND STREET were affixed at angles to the same post. I guess these roads were mostly parallel, but came together at this point. It sure looked odd.
Waverly Place (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waverly_Place) in the Greenwich Village section of New York City intersects with itself.

Waverly Place is a narrow street in the Greenwich Village section of New York City, in the borough of Manhattan. Waverly changes direction roughly at its midpoint, turning from a north-by-northwest/south-by-southeast street to a northwest/southeast street. At the intersection where this transition occurs, Waverly branches into a Y, creating an intersection of Waverly Place and Waverly Place.

Jim
2012-Aug-30, 01:57 PM
Lake Jackson, Texas, started out life as a planned company town.

Streets running N-S are named after flowering plants/trees.
Streets running E-W are named after non-flowering plants/trees.
Drives go entirely through town.
Ways run to-from downtown.
Places are in downtown.

There is the downtown intersection of This Way and That Way.
Two streets in the downtown area are North Parking Place and South Parking Place.

Trebuchet
2012-Aug-30, 02:36 PM
I remember from when I lived in New Orleans that there were parts of the "East Bank" of the Mississippi that were actually West of the "West Bank", because of the twists and turns of the river.

And the first foreign country you reach when heading south from Detroit is Canada, for the same reason.

In Salt Lake City, the streets that run past the LDS Temple Square are called North Temple, South Temple, West Temple, and East Temple, based on which side of the square they're on. So North and South Temple run east-west; and East and West Temple run north-south. That's confusing enough, but then they throw modifiers on so you have North West Temple and West South Temple and so on.

Google Maps (http://maps.google.com/maps?q=lds+near+West+North+Temple,+Salt+Lake+City, +UT&hl=en&ll=40.770418,-111.891718&spn=0.010368,0.016479&sll=47.272986,-120.882277&sspn=4.756179,8.4375&oq=lds+temple,+salt+lake&t=h&hq=lds&hnear=W+North+Temple,+Salt+Lake+City,+Utah&fll=40.775602,-111.882834&fspn=0.020734,0.032959&z=16)

pumpkinpie
2012-Aug-30, 02:42 PM
Much of St. Paul MN is both east and west of the Mississippi.
Right now I'm equidistant north and west of it.

In the Twin Cities, interstate 35 going north/south splits to go through both St. Paul (35E) and Minneapolis (35W). They are pronounced 35 eee and 35 double-u. Using "east" and "west" is a sure sign you're not from here.

DonM435
2012-Aug-30, 02:43 PM
We once had friends in a part of Columbia SC wherin all of the streets and roads surrounding some lake or other had names composed from the same basic parts: East Shore, West Shore, North Shore, North Brook, South Brook, East Brook, Brook Shore, Shore Branch, West Branch, East Branch, Left Branch . . . . I got lost a lot driving around there.

LookingSkyward
2012-Aug-30, 02:58 PM
I once lived at the bottom of a hill, with 3 dead end roads leading down... Jura Way, Jura Lane, and Jura Drive. Made it hard for first time visitors to find us.

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-30, 04:27 PM
Waverly Place (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waverly_Place) in the Greenwich Village section of New York City intersects with itself.

Are there wizards there?

swampyankee
2012-Aug-30, 04:33 PM
The Village is the oldest part of NYC, and its streets were laid out in the same way as Boston's.

KaiYeves
2012-Aug-30, 05:17 PM
Trivial things that amaze me: having live webcams of the International Space Station and the bottom of the Aegean Sea open in separate tabs and being able to toggle between them.

starcanuck64
2012-Aug-30, 05:26 PM
There was a young asian girl in the supermarket the other day with squeaker flip flops. Every time she took a step it made the same noise as dog toy squeaker.

Swift
2012-Aug-30, 06:29 PM
We once had friends in a part of Columbia SC wherin all of the streets and roads surrounding some lake or other had names composed from the same basic parts: East Shore, West Shore, North Shore, North Brook, South Brook, East Brook, Brook Shore, Shore Branch, West Branch, East Branch, Left Branch . . . . I got lost a lot driving around there.
Northeast Ohio isn't exactly mountainous. But we have a lot of towns around here with "Heights" or "Hills" in the name: Parma Heights, Willoughby Hills, Waite Hill, Richmond Heights, Cleveland Heights, Mayfield Heights, etc. I always attributed it to altitude envy.

starcanuck64
2012-Aug-30, 06:45 PM
Northeast Ohio isn't exactly mountainous. But we have a lot of towns around here with "Heights" or "Hills" in the name: Parma Heights, Willoughby Hills, Waite Hill, Richmond Heights, Cleveland Heights, Mayfield Heights, etc. I always attributed it to altitude envy.

Edmonton is basically flat but full of areas with names like Westmount(where I live), Forest Heights, Laurier Heights, Cameron Heights etc..

ToSeek
2012-Aug-30, 08:06 PM
I'm guessing there's a bit of road where Interstate 93 northbound shares lane with Route 128 southbound.
At a guess it's a bit that goes roughly east/west.

I've been confused by longtime natives who will refer to the portion of I-95 that circumvents Boston as Route 128. They're technically correct, but the highway department all but ignores that commonality, and you will look very nearly in vain for any signs that say Route 128 along that stretch.

NEOWatcher
2012-Aug-30, 08:18 PM
I've been confused by longtime natives who will refer to the portion of I-95 that circumvents Boston as Route 128. They're technically correct, but the highway department all but ignores that commonality, and you will look very nearly in vain for any signs that say Route 128 along that stretch.
We've got one of those around here.
Back in the days when state/US routes were not all limited access roads (aka freeways), the freeway portion always had a name instead of a number.

We had one that was called the Willow Freeway when I was young. It was not part of the interstate system at the time, but eventually connected up as part of I-77. It did lose it's name, probably because it's an interstate.

On the other hand, we have one which is officially route 176. Because it's not an interstate, and it's been planned since the days of naming freeways, it's still almost universally known as the Jennings freeway.

swampyankee
2012-Aug-31, 12:56 AM
I've been confused by longtime natives who will refer to the portion of I-95 that circumvents Boston as Route 128. They're technically correct, but the highway department all but ignores that commonality, and you will look very nearly in vain for any signs that say Route 128 along that stretch.

New Yorkers still call "Avenue of the Americas" 6th Avenue. Around here, the Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge is always called the Q (for Quinnipiac) Bridge.

Jim
2012-Aug-31, 01:08 AM
In the Twin Cities, interstate 35 going north/south splits to go through both St. Paul (35E) and Minneapolis (35W). They are pronounced 35 eee and 35 double-u.

That's because 35 West goes through Fort Worth and 35 East goes through Dallas.

closetgeek
2012-Aug-31, 02:02 AM
I find it amusing when people shorten words that start with W, which turn out to be more difficult than just saying the word. My friend insists on calling Buffalo Wild Wings, B-W-W, or my 12 year old who insists on saying "By the way," as "BTW," It actually takes more effort to say the "shortened" version.

DonM435
2012-Aug-31, 02:28 AM
I find it amusing when people shorten words that start with W, which turn out to be more difficult than just saying the word. My friend insists on calling Buffalo Wild Wings, B-W-W, or my 12 year old who insists on saying "By the way," as "BTW," It actually takes more effort to say the "shortened" version.

Yeah, giving one letter a three-syllable name wasn't Noah Webster's (or whomever is to blame) best idea.

Solfe
2012-Aug-31, 02:57 AM
At bedtime tonight, my daughter had the funniest case of hiccups and trivia. She said: "I know how far away the moon is." I asked her how far and she answered "Exactly 238 *HICCUP*! Exactly 2 *HICCUP*! Exactly really far away."

Gillianren
2012-Aug-31, 04:00 AM
Yeah, giving one letter a three-syllable name wasn't Noah Webster's (or whomever is to blame) best idea.

Oh, you have to go way, way before Noah Webster. To the days when it was literally written as the letter "u" doubled.

DonM435
2012-Aug-31, 12:53 PM
Just kidding.

It was Daniel Webster, right?

SeanF
2012-Aug-31, 02:34 PM
There was a young asian girl in the supermarket the other day with squeaker flip flops. Every time she took a step it made the same noise as dog toy squeaker.
We got some of those for my daughter when we adopted her. They were not flip-flops, though, but actually shoes. I've never seen them for sale anywhere here, although I'm sure you can order them online. The little girl you saw very likely brought them from China with her. :)

Which reminds me of an amusing story I heard second-hand recently. A Chinese woman was visiting the United States and was quite taken with the look of cowboy boots, which she had never seen before. Upon returning home, she searched in vain around her city for a pair to buy, but could not find them anywhere. She resorted to the Internet and ordered a pair online from a US company. When they arrived, she noticed that they were labelled "Made in China." :lol:


At bedtime tonight, my daughter had the funniest case of hiccups and trivia. She said: "I know how far away the moon is." I asked her how far and she answered "Exactly 238 *HICCUP*! Exactly 2 *HICCUP*! Exactly really far away."
That's cute. Just the other day, I was leaving with my kids. As we were going out to the garage, my wife, in the kitchen, called out something to my daughter. My daughter called back, "OK!" and then immediately turned to me and asked, "What did she say?"

Swift
2012-Aug-31, 03:03 PM
That's cute. Just the other day, I was leaving with my kids. As we were going out to the garage, my wife, in the kitchen, called out something to my daughter. My daughter called back, "OK!" and then immediately turned to me and asked, "What did she say?"
Glad to see she has already picked up those important life-skills. :)

Solfe
2012-Aug-31, 03:57 PM
The video for Live's "I Alone" was on this morning.

The video features all four band members moshing around 90's style. The funny bit is the guitarist has a guitar, the bassist has a base and the singer in screaming into the camera while the drummer stomps around in circles. He looks like a psycho fan or something because it isn't obvious who he is. He should have been holding drum sticks at least.

closetgeek
2012-Sep-01, 07:17 PM
Discovering how words that, until that moment you've only read, really sound. It makes me laugh to myself to think of how I sounded them in my head. Then everyone thinks I am crazy for laughing at apparently nothing.

KaiYeves
2012-Sep-01, 08:59 PM
Discovering how words that, until that moment you've only read, really sound. It makes me laugh to myself to think of how I sounded them in my head. Then everyone thinks I am crazy for laughing at apparently nothing.

I agree, I'm terrible at working out how to pronounce things in my head, so the ways I manage to mangle works are pretty amusing sometimes-- especially the names of foods.

closetgeek
2012-Sep-01, 11:08 PM
I agree, I'm terrible at working out how to pronounce things in my head, so the ways I manage to mangle works are pretty amusing sometimes-- especially the names of foods.

On Thurs. I learned that the words are pronounced cat-eye-on and an-eye-on, not cash-yun and an-yun. Boy was I glad I didn't call out those answers. :shhh:

Tobin Dax
2012-Sep-02, 12:08 AM
On a similar note, a couple years ago I kept seeing the word "unionized" and having to read it a second time so the sentence would make sense. This was when Wisconsin's governor was headline news. That pretty much proved that I'm a scientist. :)

DonM435
2012-Sep-02, 12:30 AM
On Thurs. I learned that the words are pronounced cat-eye-on and an-eye-on, not cash-yun and an-yun. Boy was I glad I didn't call out those answers. :shhh:

I once contrived a joke illustration involving a cation (a hydrogen nucleus with no electrons), an anion (a hydrogen nucleus with two electrons), and an onion (a hydrogen atom with stink lines eminating).

(I'm a bad artist, so I just chose to describe it.)

KaiYeves
2012-Sep-02, 01:10 AM
I once contrived a joke illustration involving a cation (a hydrogen nucleus with no electrons), an anion (a hydrogen nucleus with two electrons), and an onion (a hydrogen atom with stink lines eminating).

(I'm a bad artist, so I just chose to describe it.)
Amelia's Notebook had "Mercury Capsule", "Gemini Capsule", "Apollo Capsule" (drawings of all of those spacecraft), "Medicine Capsule" (drawing of a pill).

swampyankee
2012-Sep-02, 02:15 AM
Just kidding.

It was Daniel Webster, right?

Noah was the lexicographer.

Daniel Webster was a representative from New Hampshire and, later, senator from Massachusetts. He was also the main character in a Steven Vincent Benet short story, "The Devil and Daniel Webster." He could probably talk the legs of a dog and convince it to go for a walk after.

Gillianren
2012-Sep-02, 02:52 AM
Yes, that was probably the joke.

Swift
2012-Sep-02, 03:07 AM
On a similar note, a couple years ago I kept seeing the word "unionized" and having to read it a second time so the sentence would make sense. This was when Wisconsin's governor was headline news. That pretty much proved that I'm a scientist. :)
One of the "tests" to see if you are a chemist is how you pronounce "unionized" - do you say un-ion-ized or union-ized. :D

Another is how you define "mole" - do you say its a little animal that digs up your lawn, or do you say it is the unit of amount, such as the equivalent of 12 grams of 12C

DonM435
2012-Sep-02, 04:37 AM
One of the "tests" to see if you are a chemist is how you pronounce "unionized" - do you say un-ion-ized or union-ized. :D

Another is how you define "mole" - do you say its a little animal that digs up your lawn, or do you say it is the unit of amount, such as the equivalent of 12 grams of 12C

No, the chemist will have to clear his throat and say, "A mole? Well, it's like this. Suppose that you have . . . "

Jim
2012-Sep-02, 01:27 PM
Another is how you define "mole" - do you say its a little animal that digs up your lawn, or do you say it is the unit of amount, such as the equivalent of 12 grams of 12C

It's a sauce used in Mexican cooking.

Strange
2012-Sep-02, 01:38 PM
Another is how you define "mole" - do you say its a little animal that digs up your lawn, or do you say it is the unit of amount, such as the equivalent of 12 grams of 12C

Or, you could have a mole of moles: http://what-if.xkcd.com/4/

Nicolas
2012-Sep-03, 07:38 AM
Discovering how words that, until that moment you've only read, really sound. It makes me laugh to myself to think of how I sounded them in my head. Then everyone thinks I am crazy for laughing at apparently nothing.

I'm still struggling with "Yosemite", "Carribean" and "New Orleans".

Trebuchet
2012-Sep-03, 03:47 PM
The last one is pronounced "Norlins", I think. At least that's how I remember hearing it from the locals.

Gillianren
2012-Sep-03, 06:25 PM
I'm still struggling with "Yosemite", "Carribean" and "New Orleans".

The first one is "yoh-SEH-mih-tee," with the last two syllables kind of run together. Never "yoh-seh-MIGHT." As for "Caribbean," I'm not sure on that myself and pronounce it either way.

Swift
2012-Sep-03, 06:42 PM
Another is how you define "mole" - do you say its a little animal that digs up your lawn, or do you say it is the unit of amount, such as the equivalent of 12 grams of 12C

It's a sauce used in Mexican cooking.
The sauce is made from small rodents and 6.02 x 1023 molecules of chocolate. However, eating too much of it will cause the formation of skin blemishes, which will lead to a career as a double agent.

Tinaa
2012-Sep-03, 07:17 PM
Nahlins is what I've heard. Then again I still warsh and rinch my clothes.