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View Full Version : Wow, you mean walking on hot coals hurts??



Buttercup
2012-Jul-21, 01:57 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/least-21-treated-burns-robbins-event-070900289.html

Tony Robbins event. People yowling in severe pain, suffering 2nd and/or 3rd degree burns.

Gosh, who'd have expected it?!

Scriitor
2012-Jul-21, 02:05 PM
At least guy #22 had the sense not to go through with it.

Buttercup
2012-Jul-21, 02:07 PM
At least guy #22 had the sense not to go through with it.

Yeah.

You'd think by person #4 screaming in agony, that'd have stopped the others. Apparently not!

Perikles
2012-Jul-21, 03:03 PM
You'd think by person #4 screaming in agony, that'd have stopped the others. Apparently not!Why didn't the idiots levitate?

Noclevername
2012-Jul-21, 05:50 PM
Either they had poor preparation & training, a poorly built bed of coals, or just didn't watch the Mythbusters episode about fire-walking.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Jul-21, 06:02 PM
I'd say all of the above, plus a lack of common sense to realize that they were doing it wrong after the first people were hurt.

Moose
2012-Jul-21, 08:01 PM
I just had to share Fark's headline for this article. Best laugh I've had in the past few days.


Step 1: "Unleash the Power Within" with motivational speaker. Step 2: Walk on hot coals. Step 3: very quickly followed by steps 4,5,6,7 and 8

Noclevername
2012-Jul-21, 09:41 PM
They should have unleashed the power of shoes.

Van Rijn
2012-Jul-22, 12:25 AM
Or, you know, avoided the coals.

I'm happy to say I didn't know who Tony Robbins was. Apparently he does infomercials all the time, and he has some association with Oprah. She apparently walked across the coals once. I'm betting he mentions that a lot.

From the article:

http://www.mercurynews.com/crime-courts/ci_21125630/san-jose-21-people-treated-burns-after-firewalk?source=rss


But on a break from day two of the four-day event Friday night, others who walked on the coals said it was nothing short of life-changing.

Henry Guasch, 19, of Mountain View, said that after crossing the coals while chanting his mantra of "Cool moss," he felt powerful.

"Overcoming something like that, it's a breakthrough," he said, adding that he did slow his pace in the middle of the field and got a minor burn.

Oh, yeah, maybe you got burned because you SLOWED YOUR PACE. And of course, I don't get what's the big deal about walking on coals. To me it's just taking chances with a pointless stunt. But then maybe this nonsense explains why they think that:


Guasch and Andrew Brenner, another fire walker, both said that the keys to not getting singed are faith and concentration.

"I did it before, didn't get into the right state and got burned," Brenner said. "I knew I wasn't at my peak state. I didn't take it as serious."

No, the keys are a properly prepared bed of coals and walking quickly but carefully (don't want to stir up those coals). Having thick calluses and getting your feet wet before you walk help too.

Noclevername
2012-Jul-22, 01:14 AM
Having thick calluses and getting your feet wet before you walk help too.

I would think having wet feet would make ash and cinders stick to them.

swampyankee
2012-Jul-22, 02:18 AM
Are these people being motivated to be lemmings? Or just obedient idiots? Incidentally, it is a stunt. Faith has absolutely nothing to do with it, although concentration probably does. What we need are some motivational speakers that try not to unleash the inner lemming ;)

Van Rijn
2012-Jul-22, 04:12 AM
I would think having wet feet would make ash and cinders stick to them.

A bit of ash isn't going to hurt your feet, but vaporizing water means less heat gets to your foot.

novaderrik
2012-Jul-22, 07:30 PM
Are these people being motivated to be lemmings? Or just obedient idiots? Incidentally, it is a stunt. Faith has absolutely nothing to do with it, although concentration probably does. What we need are some motivational speakers that try not to unleash the inner lemming ;)

but people like unleashing their inner lemming.. it makes them feel empowered and fulfilled. it makes them feel unique, just like everyone else..

Paul Beardsley
2012-Jul-22, 07:40 PM
Hot coals aren't a problem. It's very hot coals you need to worry about.

Solfe
2012-Jul-22, 07:49 PM
Hot coals... pffft... Chuck Norris can walk on burning Legos. :)

swampyankee
2012-Jul-22, 09:48 PM
Heck, Chuck Norris could walk on his hands across a bed of hot coals. He's man enough not to.

WaxRubiks
2012-Jul-23, 05:35 AM
I've never felt the need to walk across hot coals, but I have wondered if maybe I should want to.


ETA: I have breathed fire a few times though. It was quite fun too.

Krel
2012-Jul-23, 05:54 AM
Or, you know, avoided the coals.

I'm happy to say I didn't know who Tony Robbins was. Apparently he does infomercials all the time, and he has some association with Oprah. She apparently walked across the coals once. I'm betting he mentions that a lot.


I wonder if she left diamonds where she stepped.

Doesn't this sound like one of those Directv commercials?

"When you're feeling bad about yourself, you attend a Tony Robbins event. When you attend a Tony Robbins event, you attempt to walk on hot coals barefoot. When you attempt to walk on hot coals barefoot, you get third degree burns. Don't attempt to walk on hot coals barefoot and get third burns...Get Directv instead"!

David.

Jens
2012-Jul-23, 08:29 AM
Either they had poor preparation & training, a poorly built bed of coals, or just didn't watch the Mythbusters episode about fire-walking.

I haven't seen the episode either (actually I've never even seen the program). But I'm curious, what was their conclusion? I don't know much about firewalking except that it seems to be a fairly common practice in festivals in India and maybe Southeast Asia? Is it just that they don't use very hot coals? I used to think that it was simply that if you did it fast enough, you'd be OK, in the same way that you can avoid being burned by quickly tossing a hot potato from one hand to the other. . .

WaxRubiks
2012-Jul-23, 10:13 AM
I've always thought there was a danger of tripping and falling into the charcoal.

Noclevername
2012-Jul-23, 10:57 AM
I haven't seen the episode either (actually I've never even seen the program). But I'm curious, what was their conclusion? I don't know much about firewalking except that it seems to be a fairly common practice in festivals in India and maybe Southeast Asia? Is it just that they don't use very hot coals? I used to think that it was simply that if you did it fast enough, you'd be OK, in the same way that you can avoid being burned by quickly tossing a hot potato from one hand to the other. . .

It's a combination of factors- proper coal preparation lets a layer of insulating ash build up on the surface of the coals (300 degrees F on top, 1100 degrees below), proper training lets you determine the right way to step (not too fast or slow-- too fast digs into the coals and lets the hot parts up, too slow keeps you in contact long enough for signifigant heat transfer).

swampyankee
2012-Jul-23, 11:13 AM
I haven't seen the episode either (actually I've never even seen the program). But I'm curious, what was their conclusion? I don't know much about firewalking except that it seems to be a fairly common practice in festivals in India and maybe Southeast Asia? Is it just that they don't use very hot coals? I used to think that it was simply that if you did it fast enough, you'd be OK, in the same way that you can avoid being burned by quickly tossing a hot potato from one hand to the other. . .

Mythbusters found out it was technique, requiring some care in walking. Adam, one of the "stars" did not take requisite care, and had quite serious burns on his feet.

starcanuck64
2012-Jul-23, 06:19 PM
I think it came down to how much pressure they were applying. Kari, Grant and Tory didn't firmly plant their feet as they walked across the coals, they kind of rolled their feet. Adam just went right at it got much more contact with the coals.

swampyankee
2012-Jul-23, 11:45 PM
I wonder if she left diamonds where she stepped.

David.

This was during one of her "light" phases; she wasn't heavy enough.

DoggerDan
2012-Jul-28, 05:37 AM
A bit of ash isn't going to hurt your feet, but vaporizing water means less heat gets to your foot.

Yet water is an excellent conductor heat, while dry skin is not...

Tobin Dax
2012-Jul-28, 08:39 AM
Yet water is an excellent conductor heat, while dry skin is not...

Heat capacity and heat conduction are two different things.

HenrikOlsen
2012-Jul-28, 08:58 AM
Yet water is an excellent conductor heat, while dry skin is not...
Leidenfrost effect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leidenfrost_effect)

Noclevername
2012-Jul-28, 03:18 PM
Leidenfrost effect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leidenfrost_effect)

Yes, but if your feet are pressed down on the coals, where is the steam going to go?

swampyankee
2012-Jul-28, 03:57 PM
Yes, but if your feet are pressed down on the coals, where is the steam going to go?

Doesn't have to go anywhere -- it's a worse conductor of heat than liquid water. I think the key is the ash layer. Ash is a poor conductor of heat.

Perikles
2012-Jul-28, 04:09 PM
I think the key is the ash layer. Ash is a poor conductor of heat.It's an ancient practice to cover fires up with ash to keep them re-lightable for a long time afterwards. Presumably the ash prevents heat loss.

publiusr
2012-Jul-28, 06:12 PM
I absolutely despise motivational speakers and busybodies off all sorts. I thought we were not supposed to try to change folks orientation--yet the fab five made comments about dresses--millionaire matchmakers insult folks--and others tell you what not to wear or horde--like my old books. So we are supposed to be empty headed but well groomed hipsters with as few books as possible, multi-tasking with i-whatsits in our spartan apartments with IKEA furnishings

Tony Robbins makes his money trying to talk folks up--when his own money comes from his physical height they cannot benefit from.

Maybe he should stick to something safer--like sweat lodges:)