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Cosmologist
2012-Jul-26, 02:13 PM
Where do I find it? Not interested in paper. just want to know everything an astronomer would know. Are there any free online courses? Wikipedia is a tad unreliable.

Solfe
2012-Jul-26, 04:49 PM
Penn State. (https://www.e-education.psu.edu/astro801/)As near as I can tell, this is a for credit course that you must register for, however, you can view the course material without registering.

Solfe
2012-Jul-27, 02:27 AM
...just want to know everything an astronomer would know...

I just noticed this line. "Everything an astronomer could know" is a huge topic of study. You are looking at anything from just a 4 year degree to multiple Ph.D's. Every astronomer is different.

EDIT = http://cosmoquest.org/forum/showthread.php/136960-Free-astronomy-course-offered-by-Duke

Cosmologist
2012-Jul-29, 07:41 AM
Thanks. I'll search for the link. Always wondered why those courses are so long. It will be fascinating to read the content summary. How to operate a telescope. Star sequences. Constellations. Can't imagine how they stretch it out to 4 years. The math is going to be hellishly complex I suppose.

Solfe
2012-Jul-29, 06:18 PM
Math, physics, chemistry, methodology, etc. are going to add up to a lot of credits. Typically, high school students will max out at Calculus or Pre-Calc, maybe some physics and some chemistry. You would be looking at 2 or 3 semesters to get those up to a level where you could minor in astronomy. An astronomy major has many more hurdles.

I would imagine that many astronomers "flavor" their college experience with electives in history, software skills, programing, and so on before graduating with a 4 year degree.

ngc3314
2012-Jul-29, 10:26 PM
It will be fascinating to read the content summary. How to operate a telescope. Star sequences. Constellations. Can't imagine how they stretch it out to 4 years.

It's got to be way more than that unless you have an eidetic memory and never make a mental mistake.

Statistics, numerical analysis, better pick up a modicum of programming on the way. Classical mechanics and statistical physics, atomic physics at least, nuclear physics if you plan to work on stellar interiors, supernovae,or early-Universe cosmology. Preparing someone past a bachelor's degree to read the research literature on galaxies is a full-term course (at least to my satisfaction (http://astronomy.ua.edu/keel/galaxies)), and so are galactic dynamics, observational techniques, stellar evolution... To my surprise, a lot of people get out of undergrad programs in physics and astronomy without what I think of as adequate online information-harvesting skills, so we have to cover that too. And then there's plasma astrophysics, which is a whole different world yet.

How hard can it be? I suspect contemporary astronomy isn't what that post suggested.

Shigeru
2012-Aug-17, 04:07 PM
Penn State. (https://www.e-education.psu.edu/astro801/)As near as I can tell, this is a for credit course that you must register for, however, you can view the course material without registering.

Interesting link, thanks!

jfribrg
2012-Aug-17, 06:30 PM
Here is an astronomy couse from Duke University (https://www.coursera.org/#course/introastro). It doesn't start for a couple more months, but it looks interesting and I've already registered.

StupendousMan
2012-Aug-24, 03:38 AM
You can find several courses I teach on-line for free. No credit, but all the material is there. I'll list them in order of sophistication (or something).

Introductory stellar astronomy (http://spiff.rit.edu/classes/phys230/phys230.html)
Introductory extragalactic astronomy and cosmology (http://spiff.rit.edu/classes/phys240/phys240.html)
Introductory stellar astronomy with more math (http://spiff.rit.edu/classes/phys301/phys301.html)
Observational astronomy (http://spiff.rit.edu/classes/phys445/phys445.html)
Stellar astrophysics (http://spiff.rit.edu/classes/phys440/phys440.html)
Advanced extragalactic astronomy (http://spiff.rit.edu/classes/phys443/phys443.html)

mutleyeng
2012-Aug-26, 01:17 AM
found a nice one on youtube if you not bothered about credits
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO7qvAETCMs
its nice as it uses wiki as the course material, so as free as it gets

Cosmologist
2012-Sep-21, 12:51 PM
Thanks guys. The net should be more educational. Like television it seems to be mostly junk. The only attempt at information gathering has been wikipedia and thats as reliable as a politicians promise.

JustAFriend
2012-Sep-21, 11:51 PM
just want to know everything an astronomer would know.

101 won't do that. In fact you'd get more out of watching the old Carl Sagan episodes of Cosmos on YouTube...

StupendousMan
2012-Sep-29, 06:55 PM
I have not browsed the site myself, but it contains a full textbook as well as many images and other resources. And it's free.

http://www.teachastronomy.com/