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View Full Version : Satlellites of large planets (in other systems), could some be life supporting?



potoole
2012-Aug-14, 09:00 PM
Similar to Jupitor, or Neptune with their large satellites, but closer to their star.
Large Jupitor sized planets have been discovered that are very close to their stars.
Perhaps there are some that exist at proper life bearing zones from stars.

I realise that such a satellite probably shouldn't orbit too close to its planet, or else it would suffer destructive forces from the large planet. For instance, satellites of Jupitor are wracked with Jupitor's magnetic fields and radiations.

Thank you
PO'T:)

Noclevername
2012-Aug-14, 10:33 PM
This (http://www.universetoday.com/92607/goldilocks-moons/) UT article suggests that some scientists think so.

Google "habitable moons" for a boatload of links on the subject.

Jupiter

Ara Pacis
2012-Aug-15, 08:37 PM
Yep, but remember that a lot of the radiation in Jupiter's orbit is caused by the volcanism on Io and that moon's low gravity. Without a moon spewing gas and dust particles into a Jovian's magnetosphere, there may not be as much of a problem for life on other moons the planet's orbit.

ravens_cry
2012-Aug-16, 01:03 AM
And even if there is, life can adapt to surprisingly high radiation conditions. Plus, wouldn't most of it be blocked by the atmosphere of a habitable world?
Though if the latter were true, it would really suck for any burgeoning space program by the natives.

swampyankee
2012-Aug-16, 02:01 PM
And even if there is, life can adapt to surprisingly high radiation conditions. Plus, wouldn't most of it be blocked by the atmosphere of a habitable world?
Though if the latter were true, it would really suck for any burgeoning space program by the natives.

The world may have some really spectacular auroras, perhaps even bright enough to mask many of the stars.

ravens_cry
2012-Aug-18, 06:22 AM
The world may have some really spectacular auroras, perhaps even bright enough to mask many of the stars.

Perhaps, but probably not enough to mask the planet it orbits depending on distances.