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Jens
2012-Aug-15, 12:14 AM
I know this is a bit off the wall, like many of my questions. I was wondering about a kind of vocal ornamentation. I'm not sure if it's really a specific style, but a lot of female singers, especially in kind of Irish-like music, tend to make this kind of head voice-ish sound at the ends of words. I'm not sure of the mechanics of it, whether they're inhaling or just going into a head voice, but I was wondering if there is a word for that. It's not vibrato. If it's not so clear, you can hear what I'm talking about at the end of the word "cryin..." at about 1:34 (as well as about every word in the chorus!)

In Japanese there's a singling style called "kobushi" that kind of reminds me of it.

Noclevername
2012-Aug-15, 12:18 AM
If it's not so clear, you can hear what I'm talking about at the end of the word "cryin..." at about 1:34 (as well as about every word in the chorus!)

In what song?

Jens
2012-Aug-15, 12:30 AM
In what song?

Very perceptive question! I forgot to include the link. Here it is (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ejga4kJUts):

Noclevername
2012-Aug-15, 01:41 AM
If you mean that hiccup-y sound, it might be the kind of singing known as a "lilt", but I might be wrong.

Jens
2012-Aug-15, 04:44 AM
Thanks for the hint. I looked around, though, and it seems like "lilting" is more of a term for a whole type of singing that's a bit like rap, with improvisations. I'm more looking for a term for that hiccup sound!

primummobile
2012-Aug-15, 09:23 AM
Thanks for the hint. I looked around, though, and it seems like "lilting" is more of a term for a whole type of singing that's a bit like rap, with improvisations. I'm more looking for a term for that hiccup sound!

Didn't you say they were Irish? It might just be too much Guinness. If there is such a thing as too much...

Tog
2012-Aug-15, 10:13 AM
I'm trying a long shot. I know of a person who probably knows, but I'm not sure if they'll respond.

Noclevername
2012-Aug-15, 10:20 AM
If an ululation is a string of sounds like that, maybe just one would be called an "ul".

Tog
2012-Aug-16, 03:39 AM
Well, I got an answer, sort of. I asked Australian singer Kate Miller-Heidke on Twitter, who does it in a lot of her songs. She's got a strong opera background but didn't know what it was called. She passed the question along to someone else. This is the edited reply.


Hi ;) If it's about the Irish Falsetto permutations at the end of phrases...? Falsetto has stiff vocal folds the folds may never meet but only oscillate and create that pure, hooty falsetto sound. The lack of effort in the mechanism and the flow of air rocks the aritenoids backwards which pulls the True folds stiff. you hear it also in the Cranberries "zombie", Alanis Morisette does it and so does Kate (Miller-Heidke) ;) every so often. Please rephrase the question if I misunderstood or simply ask if you would like to know more. Hope it helps. G
pps Katie Noonan is another one, listen to her version of Blackbird http://youtu.be/WaoMOJq4-Uk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaoMOJq4-Uk&feature=youtu.be)

--- Vocally Yours - G (@thevoicegym1 on Twitter)

Jens
2012-Aug-16, 03:55 AM
Well, I got an answer, sort of. I asked Australian singer Kate Miller-Heidke on Twitter, who does it in a lot of her songs. She's got a strong opera background but didn't know what it was called. She passed the question along to someone else. This is the edited reply.

Thanks, that's exactly what I meant. The person even mentioned the song "Zombie," which is the song I linked to earlier in the thread. Another person who does it is Sarah Mclachlan, for example in the song Angel. So it's a "hooty falsetto sound". I guess there's no real name for it. The reason I asked if because there's a similar technique that's used by Japanese singers, and it has a name, "kobushi" in Japanese. You can hear it really clearly throughout this song (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pETaj1MEIY) by Chitose Hajime. If you go to say around 0:59 or 1:00 you can hear it in the middle of a word.

Tog
2012-Aug-16, 04:02 AM
The person at @thevoice1 on Twitter is an Australian voice coach. If you've got an account, you might be able to get a dialog with him about it.