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01101001
2004-Oct-15, 02:08 AM
Nature article, 8 Oct 2004: How to build the Universe (http://www.nature.com/news/2004/041004/full/041004-17.html#B1)


Because the quantum foam fluctuates through all kinds of configurations, constructing the physical Universe means adding up all the possible tiling patterns. You might think that this would inevitably generate a four-dimensional Universe - but it doesn't. Earlier researchers found that they got a space-time with either an infinite number of dimensions or just two. Neither of these looks at all like our Universe.

First, the theory of relativity must apply within each individual tile (so that nothing can travel through it faster than light) and second, the assembly must preserve causality. This means that a piece of space-time cannot be constructed in such a way that an 'event' - some change in the Universe - precedes its cause.

When they enforced these criteria on their calculations, the researchers ended up with universes with three spatial dimensions and one time dimension - just like our own. It was "like magic", says Loll.
If it's magic...
Then why can't it be everlasting
Like the sun that always shines
Like the poets in this rhyme
Like the galaxies in time
-- Stevie Wonder

Evan
2004-Oct-15, 06:51 AM
Is there a point E?

hedin
2004-Oct-15, 12:10 PM
Nature article, 8 Oct 2004: How to build the Universe (http://www.nature.com/news/2004/041004/full/041004-17.html#B1)


Because the quantum foam fluctuates through all kinds of configurations, constructing the physical Universe means adding up all the possible tiling patterns. You might think that this would inevitably generate a four-dimensional Universe - but it doesn't. Earlier researchers found that they got a space-time with either an infinite number of dimensions or just two. Neither of these looks at all like our Universe.

First, the theory of relativity must apply within each individual tile (so that nothing can travel through it faster than light) and second, the assembly must preserve causality. This means that a piece of space-time cannot be constructed in such a way that an 'event' - some change in the Universe - precedes its cause.

When they enforced these criteria on their calculations, the researchers ended up with universes with three spatial dimensions and one time dimension - just like our own. It was "like magic", says Loll.
If it's magic...
Then why can't it be everlasting
Like the sun that always shines
Like the poets in this rhyme
Like the galaxies in time
-- Stevie Wonder

Simple answer: The curse of enthrophy

bigsplit
2004-Oct-15, 12:26 PM
Nature article, 8 Oct 2004: How to build the Universe (http://www.nature.com/news/2004/041004/full/041004-17.html#B1)


Because the quantum foam fluctuates through all kinds of configurations, constructing the physical Universe means adding up all the possible tiling patterns. You might think that this would inevitably generate a four-dimensional Universe - but it doesn't. Earlier researchers found that they got a space-time with either an infinite number of dimensions or just two. Neither of these looks at all like our Universe.

First, the theory of relativity must apply within each individual tile (so that nothing can travel through it faster than light) and second, the assembly must preserve causality. This means that a piece of space-time cannot be constructed in such a way that an 'event' - some change in the Universe - precedes its cause.

When they enforced these criteria on their calculations, the researchers ended up with universes with three spatial dimensions and one time dimension - just like our own. It was "like magic", says Loll.
If it's magic...
Then why can't it be everlasting
Like the sun that always shines
Like the poets in this rhyme
Like the galaxies in time
-- Stevie Wonder

Simple answer: The curse of enthrophy

It can last forever, in the simplest form it can reacheive. The problem is that inflation has us moving the wrong way. Is inflation correct? I don't think so. It's not magic and it began, but it can never end. If it ever ended, that too would be magic.

samsara15
2004-Oct-15, 02:18 PM
Maybe it can't end, but it can certainly evaporate, if all the baryons dissipate, via Standard Model proton decay. Or, as some theorize, Dark Energy can pull it apart.