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Squink
2012-Sep-08, 06:10 PM
Pretty picture: bizarre spherules (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/09061416-mystery-photo-spherules.html)
Now, Opportunity has seen spherical things embedded in rock before: the ubiquitous blueberries of Meridiani planum. But Opportunity is now looking at rocks more ancient than (because they're found underneath) the blueberry-bearing ones. Furthermore, these don't look like the blueberries. They're more resistant to erosion than blueberries, but they also have a tendency to crack in half, which blueberries generally don't. And the cracked-open ones seem to have rinds with different properties from their interiors. And there's so many of them, packed so closely together.
http://roadtoendeavour.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/it-just-gets-better-and-better/
http://roadtoendeavour.wordpress.com/2012/09/06/opportunity-zooms-in-on-fin-outcrop/
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/opportunity_m3064.html

These don't look like formed-in-place concretions, or for that matter packed-and-cemented spheres.
What immediately springs to mind is oncolites (https://www.google.com/search?q=oncolites&num=20&hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-a&hs=R6k&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=a4VLUKv4FOPY2AWfuIDQCQ&ved=0CCYQsAQ&biw=1633&bih=915), but that would be wild (http://www.newark.osu.edu/facultystaff/personal/jstjohn/Documents/Common-rocks/Oncolitic-limestone.htm) and unjustified speculation.

It's good to see Opportunity still producing major surprises in the Curiosity era.

Superluminal
2012-Sep-09, 03:04 AM
Wouldn't that be something if Oppy upstaged her big brother Curiosity.

Eadfrith
2012-Sep-09, 07:48 PM
They could be shells or eggs.

antoniseb
2012-Sep-09, 11:31 PM
Very cool!

ToSeek
2012-Sep-15, 12:27 AM
NASA Mars Rover Opportunity Reveals Geological Mystery (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-290&cid=release_2012-290)


NASA's long-lived rover Opportunity has returned an image of the Martian surface that is puzzling researchers.

Spherical objects concentrated at an outcrop Opportunity reached last week differ in several ways from iron-rich spherules nicknamed "blueberries" the rover found at its landing site in early 2004 and at many other locations to date.

Opportunity is investigating an outcrop called Kirkwood in the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater. The spheres measure as much as one-eighth of an inch (3 millimeters) in diameter. The analysis is still preliminary, but it indicates that these spheres do not have the high iron content of Martian blueberries.

"This is one of the most extraordinary pictures from the whole mission," said Opportunity's principal investigator, Steve Squyres of Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. "Kirkwood is chock full of a dense accumulation of these small spherical objects. Of course, we immediately thought of the blueberries, but this is something different. We never have seen such a dense accumulation of spherules in a rock outcrop on Mars."

Squink
2012-Sep-16, 09:18 PM
Pancam gives a little context for noduliferous outcrops:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2012-09-12/1P400446955EFFBVM5P2277R2M3.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2012-09-12/1P400447016EFFBVM5P2277L2M2.JPG

This rock with what appears to be a nodule bearing crust is getting a lot of attention:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2012-09-16/1P401082331ESFBW00P2563L7M1.JPG

Paul Wally
2012-Sep-17, 11:18 AM
This rock with what appears to be a nodule bearing crust is getting a lot of attention:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2012-09-16/1P401082331ESFBW00P2563L7M1.JPG


It looks as if the crust covered the whole rock, but was then broken off, like bark from a tree. What do geologists say about how it could have formed; any theories yet?

Squink
2012-Sep-25, 04:31 PM
Opportunity continues to look at these nodules.
APOD has a nice shot today: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120925.html
Also see: http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2012-09-23/1M400199189EFFBVM5P2956M2M6.JPG
Upon examining the latest, it strikes me that these things are not shaded like those nice, spherical (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap040405.html) blueberries (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap040210.html).
The shadows here look more like that of prolate spheroids, buried narrow end up. Wind erosion doesn't look to me to be the only factor here. Have to dig up some pix of the areas under different shadow conditions to get a better idea of the shape.

Eadfrith
2012-Sep-25, 08:37 PM
I don't see why they cant rule out the possibility they are some kind of fossil.

mike alexander
2012-Sep-25, 11:34 PM
Kunkar?

Superluminal
2012-Sep-26, 12:12 AM
Can't rule them out, can't rule them in either without better evidence.

Squink
2012-Sep-26, 12:37 AM
Kunkar?

Might be oolites (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oolite)/ooids (http://www.geologyrocks.co.uk/tutorials/ooid_formation), pisolites (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pisolite) or the initially mentioned oncolites (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oncolite).
No one has seen any of these off earth before.
Seems (on earth) they're primarily lake/marine deposits.

We should hear about nodule composition, Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer results, soon.

MaDeR
2012-Sep-26, 02:52 PM
I don't see why they cant rule out the possibility they are some kind of fossil.
Does not matter. Extraordinary claims need extraordinary evidence. Merely "can't rule out" does not even begin to cut it.

slang
2012-Sep-26, 11:25 PM
I don't see why they cant rule out the possibility they are some kind of fossil.

Did anyone rule out the possibility?

ToSeek
2012-Oct-03, 04:15 PM
Mars Exploration Rovers Update: Opportunity Finds Thrill of Newberries on Matijevic Hill (http://www.planetary.org/explore/space-topics/space-missions/mer-updates/2012/09-mer-update-opportunity-finds-newberries.html)


On reconnaissance of Matijevic Hill, Opportunity has driven right into another Martian mystery, compete with new kinds of "berries," tiny white veins running through two distinctive outcrops of rock, and orbital data indicating that somewhere here clay minerals are hiding, all of which has put the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission back in the science spotlight and made for another September to remember at Meridiani Planum.

The discovery of the tiny spherules or "berries" in the close-up images and detailed color panoramic pictures have had the science team brimming with theories and almost effervescing with excitement for the past two and a half weeks. "These are something different," said Steve Squyres, MER principal investigator, of Cornell University. "We have a wonderful geological puzzle in front of us."

Other than their shape, these "berries" bear no resemblance to the hematite "blueberries" that Opportunity found throughout her trek across the plains of Meridiani, and which are evidence for the past water the rover came to find. "They are not hematite blueberries," Squyres said with assurance. "I've been calling them 'newberries,' for lack of a better term.

Paul Wally
2012-Oct-04, 12:25 AM
Did anyone rule out the possibility?


Mars Exploration Rovers Update: Opportunity Finds Thrill of Newberries on Matijevic Hill (http://www.planetary.org/explore/space-topics/space-missions/mer-updates/2012/09-mer-update-opportunity-finds-newberries.html)

Imagine the media sensation if they just said: "We don't rule out the possibility that it was produced by life." I think they first want to rule out all the possible geological explanations, before even mentioning life.

Ara Pacis
2012-Oct-04, 04:36 AM
Imagine the media sensation if they just said: "We don't rule out the possibility that it was produced by life." I think they first want to rule out all the possible geological explanations, before even mentioning life.

Imagine the media sensation if they just said: "We don't rule out the possibility that it was produced by aliens." :)

FarmMarsNow
2012-Oct-04, 01:18 PM
Thanks for posting about oolites, pisites, oncolites, ooides. That helped!

Squink
2012-Oct-08, 08:37 PM
OPPORTUNITY UPDATE: (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html) The Hunt For Clay Minerals Continues- sols 3085-3090, Sept. 27, 2012-Oct. 2, 2012:
...
With the in-situ work on Azilda now complete, Opportunity performed a 8 feet (2.5-meter) bump back and forth to position the rover at a new target on Whitewater Lake. Here the plan is to reach some of the dark rinds that cover the outcrop.
...

New spot: http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/forward_hazcam/2012-10-08/1F402860888EFFBW29P1110R0M1.JPG
Unlike the Azilda siltyness, the rind takes a polish: http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2012-10-08/1M402858656EFFBW29P2935M2M1.JPG

That may be a busted open nodule at center left of the second pic.

Update ARCHIVES Give a somewhat different account of sol 3085-3090 than the current update: http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status_opportunityAll.html#sol3085 Not sure what's going on there.

Squink
2013-Jan-07, 11:02 PM
Slow going for Opportunity these days, but it's still turning up interesting images:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2013-01-06/1P410666216EFFBW%23%23P2551R2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2013-01-06/1P410490128EFFBW%23%23P2442L2M3.JPG

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-07/1M409424450EFFBW%23%23P2955M2M1.JPG

It'd be nice to have a ChemCam on this part of the planet.

TooMany
2013-Jan-08, 12:29 AM
Wow! Wouldn't a sample return mission be cool?

Squink
2013-Jan-31, 04:44 PM
Concretion formation on Mars must be as hard as falling off a log:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2013-01-31/1P412798603EFFBX36P2556R2M3.JPG
Again many of them look more conical than spherical:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-31/1M412893227EFFBX36P2905M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-31/1M412892607EFFBX36P2935M2M2.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-31/1M412891208EFFBX36P2935M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-31/1M412889819EFFBX36P2935M2M1.JPG

TooMany
2013-Jan-31, 05:53 PM
Concretion formation on Mars must be as hard as falling off a log:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2013-01-31/1P412798603EFFBX36P2556R2M3.JPG
Again many of them look more conical than spherical:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-31/1M412893227EFFBX36P2905M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-31/1M412892607EFFBX36P2935M2M2.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-31/1M412891208EFFBX36P2935M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-01-31/1M412889819EFFBX36P2935M2M1.JPG

Those look a lot like volcanic glass drops (obsidian). Unusual shapes though. Are these different from these? http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120925.html

Squink
2013-Jan-31, 07:22 PM
Are these different from these? http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120925.htmlSame general area, they look to me to be embedded in a different rock type; in a flat surface rather than on rock fins.

Squink
2013-Feb-09, 06:18 PM
Long update over at Planetary.org:
Mars Exploration Rover Update: Opportunity Quietly Completes 9 Years Uncovering More Evidence of Water (http://www.planetary.org/explore/space-topics/space-missions/mer-updates/2013/02-mer-update-opportunity-completes-nine-years-on-mars.html)

All the tiny white veins in the images turn out to be calcium sulfate, probably gypsum. Now it's moving on to examination of the 'newberries':
Opportunity approached a newberry-rich part of Flack Lake, with a 4.8-meter (16-foot) bump to the west on Sol 3206 (January 29, 2013), and snapped took a Pancam picture of a target called Broken Hammer Junior.

"We are now going to do with the newberries what we did with the veins, make multiple measurements of variable concentrations to try and tease out their composition," said Squyrs. "We have driven over to a place where we are about to begin investigation we hope will tell us more about the composition of the newberries."

"The idea is to do multiple off-set observations from a high concentration to a low concentration, so we can see what the composition of the spherules, newberries, is relative to the matrix that's holding them," added Arvidson.

galacsi
2013-Feb-11, 09:08 PM
Those look a lot like volcanic glass drops (obsidian). Unusual shapes though. Are these different from these? http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120925.html

Yes , but they could also be tectites.

How tektites form.

18053

NEOWatcher
2013-Feb-12, 03:01 PM
Yes , but they could also be tectites.
How tektites form.

Could you provide a link to a higher resolution of that picture?
It looks very interesting, but the way it is embedded here, I can't read a thing.

galacsi
2013-Feb-12, 07:34 PM
Could you provide a link to a higher resolution of that picture?
It looks very interesting, but the way it is embedded here, I can't read a thing.

With pleasure : http://www.sito.org/cgi-bin/egads/showart?show=jaf.0058

Galacsi

NEOWatcher
2013-Feb-12, 08:29 PM
Thank you.

Squink
2013-Feb-15, 12:44 AM
I'm not convinced these latest nodules (1 (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-02-14/1M412891704EFFBX36P2975M2M1.JPG) 2 (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-02-14/1M412893125EFFBX36P2975M2M1.JPG) 3 (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-02-14/1M412893125EFFBX36P2975M2M1.JPG) 4 (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-02-14/1M412981696EFFBX36P2975M2M1.JPG) ) are of the same type as the 'newberries (http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/09061416-mystery-photo-spherules.html)' seen back in Sept 2012. They've a much glassier look and sheen, and don't seem to have softer centers. Small tektites (http://nature.ca/education/cls/lp/lpextmet_e.cfm) seem a good possibility here.

TooMany
2013-Feb-16, 10:33 PM
You right, the newberries are all spherical and many are cleaved. The latest nodules are more amorphous in shape and clearly glassy whereas newberries don't appear to be glassy.

Squink
2013-Mar-15, 03:08 PM
Opportunity looks to be back in newberryish territory today:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-03-15/1M416628637EFFBXSIP2905M2M1.JPG
better pix on the 17th:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-03-17/1M416800980EFFBXSIP2905M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-03-17/1M416801247EFFBXSIP2905M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-03-17/1M416801382EFFBXSIP2905M2M1.JPG

Squink
2013-May-26, 11:41 PM
Excellent review at the Planetary Society: Mars Exploration Rovers Special Update: Opportunity's Findings at Endeavour, So Far (http://www.planetary.org/explore/space-topics/space-missions/mer-updates/2013/05-mer-special-update-opportunitys-findings-at-endeavour-crater-so-far.html)

...Noachian Period, a time on Mars some 3.6 to 4.2 billion years ago characterized by high rates of meteorite and asteroid impacts and the possible presence of abundant surface water....

Although at first blush, these small spherules look like the hematite-rich concretions dubbed "blueberries" that Opportunity found throughout her travels in the Meridiani plains, there are visual differences and "a big compositional difference," said Squyres. "These do not have the very high iron content that would be required to be the nearly pure hematite blueberries we have seen out on the plains."

The newberries do show concentric structure, with a hard outer shell and a softer middle, and are matrix supported. Contrary to earlier findings, the composition of these spherules "is different from the matrix," Squryes announced at LPSC, acknowledging work of Brad Jolliff. All the newberry data Opportunity returned home led the scientists to conclude they probably are diagenetic concretions, as are the blueberries out on the plains, but "more weakly cemented, perhaps with an iron oxide," he said. "But we're still working on that."
On the other side of Mars, at the same time, the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity is sending home images from Glenelg/Yellowknife Bay in Gale Crater that show what appear to be the same spherules and veins and fine-grained rocks. "The rocks we're finding with Opportunity are dramatically different from anything we've ever seen, but astonishingly similar to what we're seeing at the Gale Crater site. Mars is telling us something here," Squyres said in closing his talk at LPSC. "I'm not quite sure what it is, because it's speaking Martian, but it's telling us something." Perhaps Curiosity QMS can provide us stable isotope analysis (oxygen) inside vs outside the nodules. Size distribution figures might also prove interesting.

Selfsim
2013-May-27, 10:01 PM
Perhaps Curiosity QMS can provide us stable isotope analysis (oxygen) inside vs outside the nodules. Size distribution figures might also prove interesting.Unfortunately, isotopic analysis is seemingly partially broken at the moment, due to the presence of terrestrial contaminants in the solid sample handling chain.

They really do need to get this sorted out, otherwise GCMS and QMS analysis cannot unambiguously eliminate 'terrestrial-ness' to result in 'martian-ness' at 'low' concentration levels.

Some 30 to 55 nmols of the contaminant, MTBSTFA was detected at Rocknest. This is a significant background level, when compared with the 0.04 to 2.4 nmols of the organic compounds of CH2Cl2 (dichloromethane) and CH3Cl (chloromethane), whose origins are currently 'under pursuit' (because of the prominence of their concentrations in the results data).

I have a feeling that we won't be seeing a lot of published results from SAM until they figure out how to eliminate the contaminants from the analysis(??) .. and this also applies to the QMS isotopic analysis, as it also shares common pathways with the GCMS handling chain.

Squink
2013-May-27, 11:11 PM
Some 30 to 55 nmols of the contaminant, MTBSTFA was detected at Rocknest. This is a significant background level, when compared with the 0.04 to 2.4 nmols of the organic compounds of CH2Cl2 (dichloromethane) and CH3Cl...Darn. I suppose a visit from a field service rep is not covered under current program budget.
I expect they'll eventually work something out using some standard mars rock as a blank or similar, but it'd sure be nice to not have to get that complicated.

Selfsim
2013-May-27, 11:42 PM
Darn. I suppose a visit from a field service rep is not covered under current program budget.
I expect they'll eventually work something out using some standard mars rock as a blank or similar, but it'd sure be nice to not have to get that complicated.Yeah … they're pretty clever ..

This SAM 'beastie' is super-complicated, and they have a lot of variable settings they can play with. Post-analysis using the blank controls should help to explain some results, but the reactions caused by the contaminants during any heating processes, (or even during 'cold' processing) is a more difficult problem .. especially if the contamination is an intermittent leak from the MTBSTFA cup seals!

The post analysis has to be looking very, very complicated .. should be interesting to see how long it takes for the SAM results from Cumberland to become known. I seem to recall Cumberland had some spherical formations too, although I think they targetted the vein structures this time round(?)

Squink
2013-Jun-09, 08:51 PM
Opportunity has moved on to new horizons now, but a some of the larger pebbles spied by Pancam today (June 9) appear remarkably spherical:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2013-06-09/1P422744282EFFBZW8P2514L7M3.JPG

Squink
2013-Jun-23, 01:27 PM
Plenty of blueberry like rocks showing up, and structures that look remarkably like frost heave polygons (https://www.google.com/search?q=frost+heave+polygons&safe=off&client=firefox-a&hs=JN6&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=VPbGUdyUHYO29gS-rYDoBg&ved=0CDcQsAQ&biw=1424&bih=803), but can't be?
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2013-06-23/1N425235632EFFC2LMP0703L0M1.JPG

A few more:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2013-06-25/1N425416276EFFC2Y3P1814R0M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2013-06-25/1N425416327EFFC2Y3P1814L0M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2013-06-25/1N425235684EFFC2LMP0703L0M5.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2013-06-25/1N425416327EFFC2Y3P1814R0M1.JPG

JohnD
2013-Jun-24, 09:02 PM
Can't be, squink?
They keep on telling us that they have evidence in that area for free water in the past, which implies much higher temperature and pressure than nowadays, possibly rather like tundra? Tundra, where on Earth we see frost heave polygons. Are these fossil frost heaves?

John

Squink
2013-Jul-19, 06:00 PM
Twenty two miles on and Opportunity is still finding piles of blueberry like objects:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/forward_hazcam/2013-07-19/1F427453845EFFC600P1214L0M3.JPG
By way of comparison, earth's Mesabi Iron Range (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesabi_Range) is about 100 miles long.

Selfsim
2013-Jul-20, 05:49 AM
Twenty two miles on and Opportunity is still finding piles of blueberry like objects:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/forward_hazcam/2013-07-19/1F427453845EFFC600P1214L0M3.JPG
By way of comparison, earth's Mesabi Iron Range (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesabi_Range) is about 100 miles long.If you're trying to build a case for biogenic origins, try fairy circles. (http://www.livescience.com/28268-fairy-circle-mystery-solved.html) At least they're now known to be caused by Psammotermes allocerus, (http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=mysterious-desert-fairy-circles-cau-13-03-28)(sand termites). :)

Then of course, there's always the pareidolia explanation

Squink
2013-Jul-20, 11:00 AM
If you're trying to build a case for biogenic origins…Can't do that without at least a decent sectioning microscope and some isotopic analysis. Still the area covered by these remarkably uniform spheres is approaching a size that, where it in Utah, they'd make a national monument of it.

ASTRO BOY
2013-Jul-20, 09:17 PM
Great stuff Squink!
Keep up with the news and data and the awesome photos.

Squink
2013-Jul-22, 05:22 PM
Lovely drying mud type polygons just above the solar panel on this navcam shot:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/navcam/2013-07-22/1N427717166EFFC6DHP1810R0M3.JPG

Squink
2013-Jul-26, 08:00 PM
Nearing the base of Solander point, the micro imager is returning some unusual 'bubble and pit' rock surface photos:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-07-25/1M428080214EFFC6E2P2935M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-07-25/1M428080430EFFC6E2P2935M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-07-25/1M428081097EFFC6E2P2935M2M1.JPG
I don't think we've seen quite their like before.

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status_opportunityAll.html#sol3370

Squink
2013-Sep-12, 06:45 PM
Up on Solander point (http://www.planetary.org/explore/space-topics/space-missions/mer-updates/2013/08-mer-update-opportunity-begins-science-at-base-of-solander.html), Oportunuty appears to have at last run past the collection of blueberries, newberries and perhaps gooberries that have characterized it's post landing imagery.
The current run of older Noachian rocks, formed while life was just gaining a foothold on earth still delivers some interesting crusts and surface textures in micro-images:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-09-05/1M425767709EFFC3NLP2975M2M4.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-09-09/1M431980497EFFC7L2P2956M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2013-09-09/1M431982076EFFC7L2P2935M2M1.JPG

Squink
2014-Mar-10, 05:56 PM
Finally, a few blueberries (http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2014-03-07/1M417777384EFFBY00P2975M2MJ.JPG) up on Solander point (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpeg/PIA17758.jpg). There's been no sign I've seen of spherules embedded in the rock up there, perhaps these got blown in by a dust devil, or a meteor impact .

Here's this week's update over at the Planetary Society: Mars Exploration Rovers Update: Opportunity Cruises Through Winter Solstice, Into Year 11 (http://www.planetary.org/explore/space-topics/space-missions/mer-updates/2014/02-mer-update-oppy-cruises-through-winter-solstice.html)

Squink
2014-Jun-20, 07:34 PM
Embedded blueberries on June 16:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2014-06-16/1M416440431EFFBXSIP2996M2M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2014-06-16/1M416438449EFFBXSIP2996M2M1.JPG
Rover's come down from the heights somewhat, but not sure if we're inside or outside crater rim.

antoniseb
2014-Jun-20, 07:48 PM
... not sure if we're inside or outside crater rim. Pretty sure Oppy is outside the rim.
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?act=attach&type=post&id=33004 New image from Phil Stooke shows the peak with the crater on the other side.

Squink
2014-Nov-06, 02:48 AM
Looks like Oppy's back in blueberry territory:
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2014-11-05/1P209056795EFF748BP2568L6M1.JPG
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/pancam/2014-11-05/1P262326618EFF89AHP2438L7M1.JPG
Have to wait for micro imager shots to be sure.
Nov 8: Perhaps not blueberries after all, but small rounded pebbles: http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportunity/micro_imager/2014-11-08/1M468730203EFFCIQ8P2938M2M1.JPG