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jonnynemo
2012-Sep-12, 12:23 PM
Hello All
Heres an intriguing story for you. Over the last few years I have been studying subjects that encompass a lot of different subjects. One that I have been looking into more this year has been the frequency and location of gamma ray bursts from stars in our solar system. Also the history of supernovae, the dates they happened and what they can do in respect of their effects on human beings. There is more but I can elaborate as we move on. So roughly around April/May of this year I started to track GRB's in the constellation of Aquila. In June of this year their were two bursts. GRB20120617A and GRB20120618A. On the 17th and 18th respectively and both in the constellation of Aquila. I tracked these up until about 10 days ago. They were still there but still no details about the burst. I thought this was unusual as the details on others has gone up in maybe less than a week or sometimes a little longer.
Now when I looked the other day these 2 GRB's were missing and still are. I find this kinda strange. Aquila gave us an enormous burst in Aug 1998 , (see here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SGR_1900%2B14) and is a very active region for GRB's. Or so it seems.
And maybe has the potential to unleash something similar or bigger. This constellation figures prominently in ancient mythology and has something deeply esoteric about it. There is a also a theory that this constellation was known to the maya and was important enough to be shown on the great Aztec sunstone which shows the ages of man.
I would like to know if anyone has researched this subject and maybe knows a little about the data that is released. I will admit I am not up on what all the data means but maybe someone can help to unravel this little mystery. Why would these 2 GRB's get listed, have no following data for nearly 3 months and then disappear? I wonder.
Peace Out JN

antoniseb
2012-Sep-12, 12:38 PM
... In June of this year their were two bursts. GRB20120617A and GRB20120618A. On the 17th and 18th respectively and both in the constellation of Aquila. I tracked these up until about 10 days ago. They were still there but still no details about the burst. I thought this was unusual as the details on others has gone up in maybe less than a week or sometimes a little longer.
Now when I looked the other day these 2 GRB's were missing and still are. ... Why would these 2 GRB's get listed, have no following data for nearly 3 months and then disappear?

Where are you looking? Swift? Fermi-LAT? I still see them listed, though you've added two extra characters in the name... Try GRB120618A. I see it was a very dim GRB with a peak lasting about 4 seconds.

Jens
2012-Sep-13, 12:39 AM
And maybe has the potential to unleash something similar or bigger. This constellation figures prominently in ancient mythology and has something deeply esoteric about it. There is a also a theory that this constellation was known to the maya and was important enough to be shown on the great Aztec sunstone which shows the ages of man.

I wonder, do you do star-gazing at all? The reason I ask is that it seems strange to me to say that there is a theory it was known to the Maya. Aquila is quite a prominent grouping of stars, so I don't see how it is even remotely possible that the Mayans couldn't see it. Of course they know of Aquila. Anybody who looks up in the sky and is not too far in the southern hemisphere will see it. Now, some cultures may have grouped stars in different ways, but my recollection is that Aquila is fairly obvious as a grouping, like the big dipper for example. So I don't think there's anything particularly esoteric about it.

AGN Fuel
2012-Sep-13, 03:07 AM
Hello All

Hello! :)


One that I have been looking into more this year has been the frequency and location of gamma ray bursts from stars in our solar system.

I assume this is a typo. There is only one star in our solar system and fortunately for us, no GRB has emanated from it!


There is more but I can elaborate as we move on. So roughly around April/May of this year I started to track GRB's in the constellation of Aquila. In June of this year their were two bursts. GRB20120617A and GRB20120618A. On the 17th and 18th respectively and both in the constellation of Aquila. I tracked these up until about 10 days ago. They were still there but still no details about the burst. I thought this was unusual as the details on others has gone up in maybe less than a week or sometimes a little longer.
Now when I looked the other day these 2 GRB's were missing and still are.

As Antoniseb noted, the -20- you have added to the year is not correct. It is simply -12-.


This constellation figures prominently in ancient mythology and has something deeply esoteric about it. There is a also a theory that this constellation was known to the maya and was important enough to be shown on the great Aztec sunstone which shows the ages of man.

I live >30 degrees south and I can see Aquila comfortably. Altair is a very prominent star and the constellation itself is quite distinctive. I would not be at all surprised if they were aware of it.


Why would these 2 GRB's get listed, have no following data for nearly 3 months and then disappear?

Try again with the correct handle. The data is still there.

eburacum45
2012-Sep-15, 12:14 PM
The constellation Aquila contains the dark cloud known as the Aquila rift, which might have been prominent in Mesoamerican astronomy. However there is an awful lot of invented nonsense associated with Mayan astronomy, so take most of it with a large pinch of salt. Nearly all of this has been made up in recent years, much of it since the invention of the Internet.