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Glom
2004-Oct-25, 12:20 PM
What is the spaciest world you've seen, read about, thought about, etc? It can be a usual kind of planet, or a planetoid, or maybe an artificial space structure. Something natural and unspoilt or developed into space age coolness. It could be a world fully described in an Arthur C. Clarke novel, or just a painting by David Hardy, or a hypothetical construct from Orion's Arm or a spacey world from pop scifi (as if they ever come up with anything truly spacey).

I like the Dyson Forest idea from Orion's Arm. That would be a great thing to see (eburacum, we want pictures!). I thought that if the Nox of Stargate were elves from Norse mythology and the Nox world we know was Alfheim, land of the Light Elves, then other Nox could live in a Dyson Forest somewhere else and that could be Svartalfheim, land of the Dark Elves.

That place in the Looney Tunes 'Hareway to the Stars' where Marvin the Martian was planning to use the illudium Q32 explosive space modulator to blow up Earth because it obstructed his view of Venus was very cool as well. (Who thinks Marvin the Martian sounds like Heimdall the Asgard?)

I liked a spongey planetoidal thing I saw on Cosmic Safari where there are vast caves formed in the spongey structure where colourful luminescent creatures that go through ten generations in a second live on the wall and pillars making the cave glow with colour.

ngc3314
2004-Oct-25, 12:42 PM
What is the spaciest world you've seen, read about, thought about, etc? It can be a usual kind of planet, or a planetoid, or maybe an artificial space structure. Something natural and unspoilt or developed into space age coolness. It could be a world fully described in an Arthur C. Clarke novel, or just a painting by David Hardy, or a hypothetical construct from Orion's Arm or a spacey world from pop scifi (as if they ever come up with anything truly spacey).



A whole list pops out (the Universe is a mind-bogglingly big place!):

Stephen Baxter's neutron-star interior. where beings see by sound and smell with photons. His Ring was also cool - who would have expected that the Great Attractor was an artifact, designed to save matter beings from the premature deaths of stars engineered by photino birds?

The Puppeteer homeworlds.

Rama, which seems to owe something to Clarke's earlier vision of Amalthea as a spacecraft ("Jupiter Five").

I'd have to include Naboo, hand-waving geophysics aside, for its spongy interior giving an excuse for all those subNaboonean oceans in the core.

Surely Mars and Titan deserve honorable mention...

Swift
2004-Oct-25, 12:50 PM
I'd throw in Dyson spheres (there was one in the ST:NG episode with Scotty), Niven's Ringworld, and his Integral Trees.

AstroSmurf
2004-Oct-25, 12:56 PM
The Smoke Ring blew my mind, the first time I read about it.

I'd have to mention Hal Clement's Mesklin, a world where surface gravity varies from 3 to 300 G, a day is a couple of minutes long and large parts of the ocean boil away during the summer. It's got rings too... "Shaped like a fried egg", I think he put it.

Other than that, I suppose the Fractal World of David Brin's Uplift series was pretty neat as well. No examples from TV/movies come to mind, unfortunately. You'd have thought that they could do some interesting things with CGI these days...

Humphrey
2004-Oct-25, 01:15 PM
William Forchen's Lost Regiment world.

The Halo Universe- I would love to see that technology and battles in action.

Turtledoves World War universe. Finally a 20th centurey where we really try to dominate space.

Demigrog
2004-Oct-25, 05:11 PM
I've got to go with Earth. I'm a momma's boy.

Of course, there are reams of Earths out there to consider. I'd go with the B5 future Earth, as it seems to offer the most promise without becoming a neo-socialist pseudo-utopia like in, say, Star Trek. Even the Great Burn of 2762 doesn't bother me, as we'll rebuild the Earth better.

For non-Earths, I like Timothy Zahn's Triplet.

snowcelt
2004-Oct-25, 05:32 PM
Robert L Forward's Dragon's egg was neat. Beings living on the surface of a neutron star, gravity on the surface over a billion gees. Nice place to see with a remote camera, would not want to live there.

Farmer's Riverworld was fascinating. I also liked his World of Tiers.

Kaptain K
2004-Oct-25, 06:15 PM
Farmer's Riverworld was fascinating. I also liked his World of Tiers.

From the World of Tiers series, I liked the Lavalamp world which had no fixed geography. IIRC, there was also a"living world" where the surface was living skin and walking on it set off convusions, like a horse twitching off flies!

darkhunter
2004-Oct-25, 06:34 PM
Realistic* = Ringworld, Plateau, Rocheworld

Fantasy = Discworld,

Then of course are my own homebrew worlds for Role-Playing Games….


* well, sorta :D

eburacum45
2004-Oct-25, 06:37 PM
Robert Forward also had a 'Rocheworld', where two Earth type worlds orbited each other in each other's Roche Nodes;

Olaf Stapledon dreamt up a lot of interesting worlds, including a transparent waterfilled habitat, and entire necklaces of artificial worlds...

the necklace world has reoccurred in Peter Hamilton's novel The Naked God...
and I am quite fond of Paul Birch's supramundane worlds, although not (yet) used in fiction, here is our page about them...
http://www.orionsarm.com/tech/Supramundane_Worlds.html

Jpax2003
2004-Oct-25, 06:47 PM
What was the name of the planet where Arthur Dent and Ford Prefect meet Slartibartfast? THe planet inside which other planets are constructed? That's the one I like. You can keep your ring worlds, I want a planet factory.

John Dlugosz
2004-Oct-25, 08:24 PM
What, nobody mentioned flatland? Actually, I liked the Planiverse by A. K. Dewdney.

snowcelt
2004-Oct-25, 08:27 PM
Farmer's Riverworld was fascinating. I also liked his World of Tiers.

From the World of Tiers series, I liked the Lavalamp world which had no fixed geography. IIRC, there was also a"living world" where the surface was living skin and walking on it set off convusions, like a horse twitching off flies!

Can I assume you were a bit tongue and cheek when you wrote "Lavalamp" world? Yes, the Lavalite world was neat. :D

Grand Vizier
2004-Oct-25, 10:12 PM
What, nobody mentioned flatland? Actually, I liked the Planiverse by A. K. Dewdney.

The Planiverse was terrific, yeah. And another good 'flatland updated' is Ian Stewart's Flatterland (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/073820675X/qid=1098741829/sr=8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/103-1414072-3016636?v=glance&s=books&n=507846), but this harks back more to Abbott's original book and is more concerned with the maths. I really dug the everyday engineering aspects of The Planiverse - it got people designing 2D steam engines and the like.

nomuse
2004-Oct-26, 06:25 AM
I kinda enjoyed Varley's Titan somewhere back then. First seeing a Ringworld as more of an organism then a world, then (rather) anthropomorphizing said world as an old, broken down, decaying body that both is and is run by a mad, senile, trivia-obsessed god. Varley ain't to everyone's taste. Heck, I gotta be in the right mood for him myself.

Ringworld, not to change the subject too much, struck me a lot as "math problem world." You could do all these little calculations of force and movement and travel time in their pure form; "assume skrith (zero friction, zero plastic deformation, completely unbreakable), assume perfect vacuum, assume total energy output of a G-type star...."

Tobin Dax
2004-Oct-26, 10:03 PM
Stephen Baxter's neutron-star interior. where beings see by sound and smell with photons. His Ring was also cool - who would have expected that the Great Attractor was an artifact, designed to save matter beings from the premature deaths of stars engineered by photino birds?

I agree. I love the idea of colonizing a neutron star, creating a new form of life and all those details. I also liked the high-G universe in Raft. The cool stuff that could happen there (i.e. acrobats orbiting each other) was just great.

Dickenmeyer
2004-Oct-27, 05:02 AM
How about Robert Silverberg's Majipoor? A gigantic but metal-poor and thus low density/normal gravity place. I'm not sure a planet that lacking in elements like iron, copper, zinc and magnesium would be a very hospitable place for life to evolve though, bring your vitamin and mineral supplements. I thought Niven's Smoke Ring was pretty far out, too.