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starcanuck64
2012-Nov-01, 06:06 PM
I'm guessing these were intended for kids.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jelly_Belly#Bertie_Bott.27s_Every_Flavour_Beans


Bertie Bott's Every Flavor Beans
Bertie Bott's Every Flavour Beans were based on a product featured in the Harry Potter book series. These can be found in Hot Topic stores, the Islands of Adventure theme park in Orlando, Florida, Toys R Us, online, and select book stores. They are ambiguously colored and consist of a mixture of the original jellybean flavors, as well as some unique, less pleasant ones like grass, vomit, rotten eggs and boogers. The brand is sold under license to Frankford Candy & Chocolate Company, which bought Cap Candy, a division of Hasbro.
According to the Harry Potter Lexicon [2], flavors may include sardine, black pepper, grass, horseradish, vomit, booger, earwax, dirt, earthworm, spaghetti, spinach, soap, sausage, pickle, bacon, and rotten egg.

BeanBoozled
BeanBoozled jelly beans come in 20 flavors, each with an outer shell designed to mimic a traditional flavor. In the 2nd edition, Earwax and Black Pepper are replaced by two new flavors, Canned Dog Food and Centipede. [8] Released January 2008, the flavors (some of which have appeared in the Bertie Bott's Every Flavor Beans sets) include:
Licorice (Skunk Spray)
Top Banana (Pencil Shavings)
Caramel Corn (Moldy Cheese)
Coconut (Baby Wipes)
Berry Blue (Toothpaste)
Buttered Popcorn (Rotten Egg)
Cafe Latte (Earwax) (replaced by Canned Dog Food in 2nd edition)
Juicy Pear (Booger)
Peach (Barf)
Plum (Black Pepper) (replaced by Centipede in 2nd edition)
Strawberry Jam (Centipede)
Chocolate Pudding (Canned Dog Food)

Lurking Nerd
2012-Nov-01, 07:05 PM
I'm guessing these were intended for kids.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jelly_Belly#Bertie_Bott.27s_Every_Flavour_Beans

I never really understood this and I'm sure I've seen it in other shows, not just Harry Potter. They can perform magic so now they eat all kinds of weird stuff that is normally considered disgusting, such as the vomit flavored candies. They're still human, so why the gross food? Or does the magic force change the taste buds in some weird way? Doesn't make any sense to me.

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-01, 07:07 PM
I never really understood this and I'm sure I've seen it in other shows, not just Harry Potter. They can perform magic so now they eat all kinds of weird stuff that is normally considered disgusting, such as the vomit flavored candies. They're still human, so why the gross food? Or does the magic force change the taste buds in some weird way? Doesn't make any sense to me.

I took it as a way to accentuate the differences between the conventional Muggle world and the world of witches and wizards.

Gillianren
2012-Nov-01, 07:22 PM
The implication I always got was that the decent-flavoured ones were more common than the really gross ones. In the first book, Dumbledore says he stopped eating them as a child upon encountering a vomit-flavoured one, and according to Ron, one of the twins was pretty sure he'd gotten . . . let's say a bodily secretion-flavoured one. (And then at the end, Dumbledore gets earwax.) But you figure Dumbledore's reaction to the vomit-flavoured one would be pretty common, so it wouldn't be in the company's best interests to make the gross outnumber the good. Personally, I've always assumed (when I thought about it at all) that there was a spell involved, and possibly it was difficult to alter it to leave out flavours you wouldn't want to eat.

As to what I, personally, won't eat, well, it's a long list.

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-01, 07:26 PM
I can see as a 10 or 12 year old how it would be fun to take the risk of eating something that tasted really gross, as an adult it would probably put me off food for a while to eat a vomit or earthworm flavored jelly belly.

SkepticJ
2012-Nov-01, 08:35 PM
Licorice (Skunk Spray)

Oh, so they improved the taste.

Jens
2012-Nov-02, 02:28 AM
I never really understood this and I'm sure I've seen it in other shows, not just Harry Potter. They can perform magic so now they eat all kinds of weird stuff that is normally considered disgusting, such as the vomit flavored candies.

And they also play a stupid game. So I wouldn't try to read too much into it.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-02, 05:12 AM
The Harry Potter books - at least the early ones - were intended to appeal to children. Children are easily amused by the thought of eating gross things. Rowling's instincts were clearly on the mark as she enjoyed a measure of success with her books.

Things I don't eat because they are on my hate list include pasta, parsnips, yorkshire puddings, courgettes.

Things I tend not to eat include sweets that don't contain chocolate and fast food from the main providers (McDonalds, Burger King, and KFC except once in a while).

I also don't eat things which are not meant to be eaten such as torch batteries, politicians, sports equipment and garden sheds.

Ara Pacis
2012-Nov-02, 06:10 AM
Things I don't eat because they are on my hate list include pasta...

Pasta?

redshifter
2012-Nov-02, 06:35 AM
I also don't eat things which are not meant to be eaten such as torch batteries, politicians, sports equipment and garden sheds.

You haven't lived till you've eaten a delicious garden shed...it's all in the preparation :)

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-02, 07:09 AM
Pasta?

Yes, pasta. I hate it. You're not the first to express surprise. Yesterday I mentioned it to my two Italian students and they were amazed, and other people have asked, "What's not to like?" I find the texture wormlike and the taste emetic.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-02, 07:10 AM
You haven't lived till you've eaten a delicious garden shed...it's all in the preparation :)

I guess I just haven't found the right shed-chef.

Jens
2012-Nov-02, 07:20 AM
I guess I just haven't found the right shed-chef.

You still wouldn't like it, though. With the right chef it tastes like pasta.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-02, 02:13 PM
You still wouldn't like it, though. With the right chef it tastes like pasta.

Nonsense, sheds taste like that other Italian food, the one that I do like. Surely you've heard of Pizza Hut?

Jim
2012-Nov-02, 03:36 PM
I'm a kind man... a caring man... but some people deserve to die a slow and painful death.

DonM435
2012-Nov-02, 06:16 PM
Pasta?

I looked it up in a book on foods, and apparently, lots of folks are antipasta.

That is ... wait ... :doh: never mind!

Noclevername
2012-Nov-02, 08:04 PM
For me, it's beets or liver. Both made me literally throw up when I was a kid, and I'm not anxious to repeat the experiment.

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-02, 09:25 PM
Coconut (Baby Wipes)

Who in their right mind would want to eat anything that tasted like baby wipes?

Trebuchet
2012-Nov-03, 01:53 AM
For me, it's beets or liver. Both made me literally throw up when I was a kid, and I'm not anxious to repeat the experiment.

A phrase I remember hearing over and over in my childhood: "Great Grandaddy liked beets!". I'll eat them pickled, in small quantities, with a salad, but otherwise I'll pass. Great Grandaddy not withstanding. And even though I actually remember meeting him.

Liver is ok once in a while. Broccoli, on the other hand....

Ara Pacis
2012-Nov-03, 06:50 AM
Yes, pasta. I hate it. You're not the first to express surprise. Yesterday I mentioned it to my two Italian students and they were amazed, and other people have asked, "What's not to like?" I find the texture wormlike and the taste emetic.

I wouldn't know, I've never eaten worms... as far as I recall.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-03, 07:31 AM
For me, it's beets or liver. Both made me literally throw up when I was a kid, and I'm not anxious to repeat the experiment.

I can't believe I didn't include liver. Liver has its own pocket universe of horribleness. I accept that some people (my wife included) like the stuff, but for those who don't like it, it is quite beyond the pale, seriously. When I was a child, I was a guest at a friend's house, and I was made to eat liver. I didn't have the vocabulary to express it, but it felt as if my hosts were breaking a taboo.

Kidneys aren't much better. I had an idea a while back that if you are having a party with lots of guests, and you're thinking of doing a kidney-based dish, but some of your guests are vegetarians, a suitable alternative would be balls of tofu marinaded in urine.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-03, 07:35 AM
I wouldn't know, I've never eaten worms... as far as I recall.

Nor have I, TBH, but I imagine worms are more pleasant than pasta.

Other things I'd never eat include things that are impossible to eat because they have no physical existence: lines of longitude, puns and anagrams. Although I do have a student who eats his words.

NEOWatcher
2012-Nov-06, 03:41 PM
I'm guessing these were intended for kids.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jelly_Belly#Bertie_Bott.27s_Every_Flavour_Beans
At least those are just names for traditional flavors.
Long before Harry Potter, I've seen candy flavors sold in novelty stores that actually had the equivelent disgusting taste.

With me, I'm pretty much an omnivore, and it's the quantity, preparation, or combinations that throw me off.
Although, peanut butter*, raisins and prunes are on the list.
*(the strange thing is that I like peanuts)

A freind of mine (when I was young) wouldn't eat anything with pepper. One day he ate at our house and noticed the pepper on his salad. My mom just said it's dirt that wasn't washed off. He was fine with that.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-06, 03:54 PM
I won't eat chilli con carne unless I know and like the person who made it. This isn't an affectation; I'm really not comfortable with the idea of eating that particular dish if I'm not on friendly, familiar terms with the cook.

Actually I could have left off the "and like" because not many of my enemies would feed me, and those who would are vegetarians.

Strange
2012-Nov-06, 03:57 PM
I won't eat chilli con carne unless I know and like the person who made it. This isn't an affectation; I'm really not comfortable with the idea of eating that particular dish if I'm not on friendly, familiar terms with the cook.

Can you explain why? It doesn't have any ingredients that aren't in many other dishes (even if your host is lucky enough to have fresh epazote).

I'm with you on kidneys, though. And ... that might be it. Not too keen on tongue (from having to peel the skin off them when I worked in a kitchen) or fish roe.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-06, 04:09 PM
Can you explain why?

No, I don't think it's anything rational.


It doesn't have any ingredients that aren't in many other dishes (even if your host is lucky enough to have fresh epazote).

What is epazote? (I could look it up but I'm procrastinating.)


I'm with you on kidneys, though.

Yay! Right-thinking human!


And ... that might be it. Not too keen on tongue (from having to peel the skin off them when I worked in a kitchen) or fish roe.

Tongue? Eugh! It's been in the animal's mouth!

No, I'd rather have an omelette.

Strange
2012-Nov-06, 04:12 PM
What is epazote? (I could look it up but I'm procrastinating.)

It's a Mexican herb. It is supposed to also reduce the windy side effects of all those beans. I do not know if there is any truth in that.

I got some once as a freebie when I bought some chillies but it was all dried up and tasteless.

SeanF
2012-Nov-06, 05:05 PM
Tongue? Eugh! It's been in the animal's mouth!
Don't want to taste anything that might be tasting me back. :)

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-06, 05:07 PM
Don't want to taste anything that might be tasting me back. :)

Did nobody get my joke, or are they ignoring it with the contempt it deserves?

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-06, 05:27 PM
Asparagus and Brussels sprouts, I had some pretty good battle of wills with my parents over the eating of these.

I'm not big on organ meats either and don't really like veal or pate also.

Trebuchet
2012-Nov-06, 08:50 PM
Asparagus and Brussels sprouts, I had some pretty good battle of wills with my parents over the eating of these.

I'm not big on organ meats either and don't really like veal or pate also.

Asparagus isn't all that bad, although I have to confess I favor the canned stuff over fresh. Brussells sprouts and broccoli, on the other hand, are abominations.

Moose
2012-Nov-06, 09:13 PM
Pretty much anything in my fridge and pantry at the moment. Flu. Hungry but not feeling up to cooking. Someone want to come baby me for the evening? No? Egh. Fine.

Moose
2012-Nov-06, 09:16 PM
Asparagus isn't all that bad.

Asparagus is very good, but it's easy to ruin. The trick is to buy young shoots, cut off the white part of the stem. Wrap in foil with a pat of butter, then grill on the bun rack for fifteen minutes until it softens, but before it goes limp. (It works in the oven (15 minutes) or toaster oven (25-30), too. Never steam it in water, it picks up that aluminum taste from being in the pot.

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-07, 12:44 AM
Asparagus is very good, but it's easy to ruin. The trick is to buy young shoots, cut off the white part of the stem. Wrap in foil with a pat of butter, then grill on the bun rack for fifteen minutes until it softens, but before it goes limp. (It works in the oven (15 minutes) or toaster oven (25-30), too. Never steam it in water, it picks up that aluminum taste from being in the pot.

Which is how my mom cooked it, so maybe I'll give it another try, it's been close to 40 years since I was forced to, "Eat your asparagus!"


Asparagus isn't all that bad, although I have to confess I favor the canned stuff over fresh. Brussells sprouts and broccoli, on the other hand, are abominations.

Maybe there's a better way to cook them than steaming like Moose is talking about, there is one dish my sister makes with broccoli, mushroom soup, almonds and some other stuff that isn't too bad.

Moose
2012-Nov-07, 11:27 AM
Maybe there's a better way to cook them than steaming like Moose is talking about, there is one dish my sister makes with broccoli, mushroom soup, almonds and some other stuff that isn't too bad.

You can do broccoli the same way as I suggested doing asparagus. My friend swears (and I've tried it, although not made it myself) that the best way to make brussel sprouts is by nuking them in the microwave. Again, they soften just right and never pick up that... weird oxidized after-taste you get if you steam them conventionally. Further proof: his kids both love brussel sprouts.

Trebuchet
2012-Nov-07, 05:27 PM
...the best way to make brussel sprouts is by nuking them... ...with a 10 kiloton bomb.

Buttercup
2012-Nov-07, 05:37 PM
...with a 10 kiloton bomb.

Lol!! :) Yep. I have yet to taste a good brussel sprout.

Lots of things on my would never eat list (unless facing starvation): Raw oysters, all insects, clams (regardless of how fixed), brains.

Noclevername
2012-Nov-07, 06:06 PM
Braaaaaains!

My father told me when he was a kid my grandmother fixed cow brains and eggs, and he and his brothers used to slip it to the dog under the table.

NEOWatcher
2012-Nov-07, 06:31 PM
My father told me when he was a kid my grandmother fixed cow brains and eggs, and he and his brothers used to slip it to the dog under the table.
We ate that on occasion. We ate it without hesitation. (maybe not a preffered dish, but not one we whined about)

DonM435
2012-Nov-07, 06:37 PM
I'd guess that brains taste sweet. I remember the scent when we ground some up to extract RNA ia a biochemistry class. But I'm not going to test the theory myself.

Noclevername
2012-Nov-07, 06:53 PM
We ate that on occasion. We ate it without hesitation. (maybe not a preffered dish, but not one we whined about)

My father didn't whine either, he just found an alternate solution. The dog, however, whined all the time.

DonM435
2012-Nov-07, 08:46 PM
My father didn't whine either, he just found an alternate solution. The dog, however, whined all the time.

Was the dog, by any chance, a melancholy?


;)

Whirlpool
2012-Nov-07, 09:47 PM
Foods that I don't eat are :

- frogs, snakes, anything exotic including bugs (Asian countries cook these) , internal organs including blood .
I tried eating veal , I dunno .. I just don't like the taste.

Noclevername
2012-Nov-07, 09:48 PM
Yeah, veal is another one I just don't care for. It tastes a grey as it looks.

Fazor
2012-Nov-07, 10:03 PM
I can't eat bugs. I can't even see dead bugs (like flies on windowsills) without gagging (sometimes more than gagging.) I don't know why. Some stupid mental defect -- yes, among the sea of other mental defects I carry -- but dead bugs are horrible.

I can't eat anything that still has legs, heads, or eyeballs attached. I love shrimp. Oh, "peel and eat"? No thanks.

Besides, they look like spiders that way. And I mentioned my thing about bugs.

I'd have a hard time eating brain. Tongue meet? As long as it's not just a whole tongue I'd try it. Liver? I crave it from time to time (mother used to make it) but then I remind myself they're full of toxins, given that's what livers do, and take a pass on it. Heart? Same as tongue -- just couldn't resemble a heart. The rest of the "offal" organs? Depends. Might try them -- if properly prepared. Probably wouldn't enjoy.

Of "normal" foods, there's not much I wouldn't try. Though as with anything in life, I prefer to approach dishes on a case-by-case basis. :)

Jens
2012-Nov-08, 02:27 AM
I can't eat bugs.


I can't eat anything that still has legs, heads, or eyeballs attached. I love shrimp. Oh, "peel and eat"? No thanks.

As far as I remember, I've only had bugs once (at least intentionally, because we all consume them by accident). I had grasshoppers fried in sweet batter. It's actually not a big deal if you don't think about it, just crunchy sweet things. No taste of the bug. And actually, I guess it didn't gross me out because I've gotten used to eating shrimp fried whole. In Japanese pubs they have these small shrimps just fried as is, and they're not bad. You don't really taste the non-meat parts very much at all.

Jens
2012-Nov-08, 02:28 AM
anything exotic including bugs (Asian countries cook these).

Not only Asian countries. They're also served in South America and in Africa. Apparently there's an Italian cheese that has bugs in it, so at least traditionally, I'm sure they were eaten in Europe as well.

Noclevername
2012-Nov-08, 03:07 AM
Asparagus isn't all that bad, although I have to confess I favor the canned stuff over fresh. Brussells sprouts and broccoli, on the other hand, are abominations.

Canned asparagus always seems slimy and mushy to me. Broccoli I prefer raw, cooked it tastes like it smells. And Brussells sprouts...

I got nothing. They really are bad.

Jens
2012-Nov-08, 04:08 AM
And Brussells sprouts...
I got nothing. They really are bad.

It's interesting that so many people say that. I agree, I can't see anything positive about them at all. I wonder, then, why do they sell them? Is it just a means for parents to torment their children?

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-08, 07:06 AM
I like Brussell (sp?) sprouts. They are only a problem if they are overcooked, as they often are.

Gillianren
2012-Nov-08, 07:36 AM
Brussels. Like the city.

Jens
2012-Nov-08, 07:46 AM
Brussels. Like the city.

In fact, I dislike the things so much that I feel sorry for people who have to live in a city that was named after them. :)

Noclevername
2012-Nov-08, 08:24 AM
There are things like blowfish and live octopus, where both preparing and eating them require specific skills for the meal to not end in death. I think I'll pass on those, too, and hand the Darwin awards to those who feel the need for them.

Moose
2012-Nov-08, 10:52 AM
It's interesting that so many people say that.

It seems that nobody knows how to cook them right.

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-08, 08:05 PM
Not only Asian countries. They're also served in South America and in Africa. Apparently there's an Italian cheese that has bugs in it, so at least traditionally, I'm sure they were eaten in Europe as well.

We also eat them here, we just don't think about it much.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Food_Defect_Action_Levels

Jim
2012-Nov-08, 10:22 PM
I like asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and liver. Maybe not all at the same time, but I like them.

What about okra? How do you folks feel about okra? (Yes, I like it, too.)

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-08, 10:24 PM
I'm not sure if I've ever had okra, I think it's more of a southern food isn't it?

Noclevername
2012-Nov-08, 10:26 PM
I had okra once.

Once.

Moose
2012-Nov-08, 11:00 PM
I'm not sure if I've ever had okra, I think it's more of a southern food isn't it?

I hear it's very popular in Okrahoma.

http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/smilies/rimshot.gif

Jens
2012-Nov-08, 11:57 PM
What about okra? How do you folks feel about okra?

YUCK!

Jens
2012-Nov-09, 12:01 AM
There are things like blowfish and live octopus, where both preparing and eating them require specific skills for the meal to not end in death. I think I'll pass on those, too, and hand the Darwin awards to those who feel the need for them.

I assume you're talking about the death of the eater, rather than the death of the eatee, which goes without saying I guess. That's definitely true about blowfish, but octopus? I've never heard that, and I sometimes eat it raw. Do you mean because of food poisoning?

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-09, 01:59 AM
I assume you're talking about the death of the eater, rather than the death of the eatee, which goes without saying I guess. That's definitely true about blowfish, but octopus? I've never heard that, and I sometimes eat it raw. Do you mean because of food poisoning?

It seems all octopi are venomous, but only the Blue Ring is deadly to humans.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus


All octopuses are venomous, but only one group, the blue-ringed octopuses, is known to be deadly to humans.

swampyankee
2012-Nov-09, 02:25 AM
I won't eat raw meat or raw fish -- I think all the shows that glorify it are staffed by crazy people. Raw pork? Trichinosis, anybody? Raw game? If a wild animal does not have a serious parasite load, included parasite eggs encysted in muscle and organs, I'd be surprised. Raw freshwater fish and raw Asian freshwater crabs are also more likely than not to carry parasites.

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-09, 02:46 AM
I have anaphylaxis and am seriously allergic to all seafood so that's another thing I never eat.

Jens
2012-Nov-09, 04:31 AM
I won't eat raw meat or raw fish -- I think all the shows that glorify it are staffed by crazy people. Raw pork? Trichinosis, anybody? Raw game? If a wild animal does not have a serious parasite load, included parasite eggs encysted in muscle and organs, I'd be surprised. Raw freshwater fish and raw Asian freshwater crabs are also more likely than not to carry parasites.

It's funny, I was going to respond that perhaps that's why people in other parts of the world tend to be slimmer than Americans. But then I happened to look at the latest issue of Nature, and there's actually a commentary about clinical trials to deliberately infect people with parasites in order to cure autoimmune diseases. If you can access Nature, it's titled "Autoimmunity: the worm returns."

Noclevername
2012-Nov-09, 04:37 AM
I assume you're talking about the death of the eater, rather than the death of the eatee, which goes without saying I guess. That's definitely true about blowfish, but octopus? I've never heard that, and I sometimes eat it raw. Do you mean because of food poisoning?

Raw, or live? The live (whole) ones have to be very carefully prepared, basically tied in a knot; if their arms get loose they can latch onto the inside of the throat with their suckers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sannakji

Several incidents of choking on Sannakji have been reported. One of the latest incidents occurred in Gwangju.

Jens
2012-Nov-09, 06:32 AM
Raw, or live? The live (whole) ones have to be very carefully prepared, basically tied in a knot; if their arms get loose they can latch onto the inside of the throat with their suckers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sannakji

Yeah, I didn't notice the "live" there, I thought you meant raw. I didn't know people actually ate whole octopi live. . .

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-09, 07:03 AM
Point of pedantry: I recently read that the correct plural of "octopus" is "octopuses", or , if you want to be technical, "octopodes", but definitely not "octopi".

Jens
2012-Nov-09, 07:07 AM
Point of pedantry: I recently read that the correct plural of "octopus" is "octopuses", or , if you want to be technical, "octopodes", but definitely not "octopi".

Thanks for that. I had heard that somewhere, and tried typing in octopusses, but the spellchecker gave me the evil red underline, and it didn't occur to me that it might be because I put in two S symbols. And octopi seemed OK by the spellchecker, so I left it in. And by the way, the spellchecker doesn't seem to like octopodes very much.

Ara Pacis
2012-Nov-09, 09:13 AM
I won't eat chilli con carne unless I know and like the person who made it. This isn't an affectation; I'm really not comfortable with the idea of eating that particular dish if I'm not on friendly, familiar terms with the cook.

Actually I could have left off the "and like" because not many of my enemies would feed me, and those who would are vegetarians.

Is your name Scott Tenorman?

swampyankee
2012-Nov-09, 12:25 PM
It's funny, I was going to respond that perhaps that's why people in other parts of the world tend to be slimmer than Americans. But then I happened to look at the latest issue of Nature, and there's actually a commentary about clinical trials to deliberately infect people with parasites in order to cure autoimmune diseases. If you can access Nature, it's titled "Autoimmunity: the worm returns."

I've heard (NPR) and read (my wife is an RN and gets journals...) the same thing, but some parasites are more dangerous than others. For example, cholera outbreaks traced to fish used in ceviche are not uncommon in Peru and Ecuador. Many parasites are dangerous: Taenia solium, pork tapeworm, will attack peoples brains (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0010553/ ) and trichinosis has no treatment, except palliatives, once the muscles are invaded by cysts (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001655/ ).

Cougar
2012-Nov-09, 01:58 PM
Mmm. Tasty.

DonM435
2012-Nov-09, 02:05 PM
Point of pedantry: I recently read that the correct plural of "octopus" is "octopuses", or , if you want to be technical, "octopodes", but definitely not "octopi".

So, someone who is bold in the gustatory sense but timid lingusitically should say "I'll have an octopus. And then, bring me another one."

Trebuchet
2012-Nov-09, 03:23 PM
Thanks for that. I had heard that somewhere, and tried typing in octopusses, but the spellchecker gave me the evil red underline, and it didn't occur to me that it might be because I put in two S symbols. And octopi seemed OK by the spellchecker, so I left it in. And by the way, the spellchecker doesn't seem to like octopodes very much.

Yup. As soon as I started editing this, the red underlines showed up, although in my case under "octopi" as well. It always shows up when I type one of my rants about raccoons as well. Apparently it doesn't like plural animals. BTW, "Jens" is also misspelled.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-09, 03:41 PM
Apparently it doesn't like plural animals.

I had real difficulty getting my English Language students to accept that "sheep" is both singular and plural.

"One sheep," I said, counting off on my fingers, "two sheep, three sheep, four sheep..."

"What if you have fifty?" one student asked.

"Fifty sheep," I answered, receiving a skeptical look in response.

It was one of those moments when I felt like saying, "Honestly, I'm a native English speaker, a fully qualified teacher of adults, a qualified EFL teacher and a published author to boot. I do know this stuff!"

Gillianren
2012-Nov-09, 06:20 PM
Raw pork? Trichinosis, anybody?

Actually not that much of a problem, at least in the US. More people get trichinosis from bear every year than pork.

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-09, 07:10 PM
Mmm. Tasty.

Is that a fiddlehead with octopus, some diabolical force must be at work there?

starcanuck64
2012-Nov-09, 07:14 PM
Point of pedantry: I recently read that the correct plural of "octopus" is "octopuses", or , if you want to be technical, "octopodes", but definitely not "octopi".

I've read that all three are acceptable.

Ara Pacis
2012-Nov-09, 07:33 PM
I've read that all three are acceptable.

Only if cooked.

DonM435
2012-Nov-09, 07:33 PM
Actually not that much of a problem, at least in the US. More people get trichinosis from bear every year than pork.

Whew! For a moment I thought you indicted beer. Bear, I can avoid.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-09, 08:41 PM
I've read that all three are acceptable.

True, but sometimes "octopi" is presented as if it's the only correct one, whereas it's actually acceptable only because people have wrongly used it so often.

Fazor
2012-Nov-09, 10:58 PM
True, but sometimes "octopi" is presented as if it's the only correct one, whereas it's actually acceptable only because people have wrongly used it so often.

But the real question is, how acceptable is octo-pie? I think I might bring that to the in-laws for Thanksgiving, just to show my appreciation . . .


(I actually really like my in-laws, but that ruins the joke)

Moose
2012-Nov-10, 01:00 AM
(I actually really like my in-laws, but that ruins the joke)

Easy solution: actually do it. Problem solved. :P

Durakken
2012-Nov-10, 03:41 AM
I never really understood this and I'm sure I've seen it in other shows, not just Harry Potter. They can perform magic so now they eat all kinds of weird stuff that is normally considered disgusting, such as the vomit flavored candies. They're still human, so why the gross food? Or does the magic force change the taste buds in some weird way? Doesn't make any sense to me.

Not that I think JK was thinking this, but magic in the Harry Potter world would come from the person casting the spell and thus would be using their own energy and such within themselves. This being the case it is possible that the taste buds of someone who can cast magic are different due to the need to taste some ingredient within food and be attracted to it... This being the case it is possible that something that tastes good or bad to non-magic wielding people would taste completely different to spell casters.

Ara Pacis
2012-Nov-10, 07:51 AM
But the real question is, how acceptable is octo-pie? I think I might bring that to the in-laws for Thanksgiving, just to show my appreciation . . .


(I actually really like my in-laws, but that ruins the joke)

I usually cut a pie into eight slices.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-10, 08:07 AM
Not that I think JK was thinking this, but magic in the Harry Potter world would come from the person casting the spell and thus would be using their own energy and such within themselves. This being the case it is possible that the taste buds of someone who can cast magic are different due to the need to taste some ingredient within food and be attracted to it... This being the case it is possible that something that tastes good or bad to non-magic wielding people would taste completely different to spell casters.

I think it was made clear that vomit and earwax were as unpleasant to the likes of Dumbledore as they are to us muggles.

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-10, 11:44 AM
I won't eat chilli con carne unless I know and like the person
who made it. This isn't an affectation; I'm really not comfortable
with the idea of eating that particular dish if I'm not on friendly,
familiar terms with the cook.
Can you explain why? It doesn't have any ingredients that aren't
in many other dishes (even if your host is lucky enough to have
fresh epazote).
I immediately wanted to ask the same question, for the same
reason. I'm so glad you asked! ... Although I haven't read Paul's
reply yet. Maybe I'll change my mind in a moment...

I never heard of epazote before. I was afraid it would be a hot
chili pepper or the like. (I like chili, but don't like hot.) Instead
I see that it's an herb, and it might be something I'd really like
in chili. I wonder if I've ever had it in chili and not known it.

What I've noticed about chili (with beans), and about beans
in general, is that the beans are generally softer and "fluffier"
than I seem to remember from decades ago. I'm not sure what
consistency they should have -- they certainly shouldn't be
hard -- but they shouldn't be fluffy, either.

Disliking pasta sure is surprising. It is just bland, a base for
other things. While not at all interesting, it seems completely
inoffensive.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-10, 11:55 AM
Can you explain why?
No, I don't think it's anything rational.
Well!



What is epazote? (I could look it up but I'm procrastinating.)
As I implied, I looked it up. I wrote it down so there is a
better than 5% chance I will look for it at the store, and
maybe a .02% chance I'll actually buy some, if I also buy
something appropriate to put it in...

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-10, 12:20 PM
Regarding Brussels sprouts: My impression, too, is that
microwaving them works. The last couple of times I've
nuked frozen brussels sprouts I've thought they were
pretty good.

Anything you hated as a kid might be a whole lot better
ten, twenty, thirty, or forty years later.

On the other hand, my sister just berated me for being
stuck eating the same foods I ate 40 years ago.

And on the *other* hand, I'm very dissappointed with
ice cream recently. Too sweet and too airy. My mother
is addicted to it, though. I love good ice cream, but
not the junk I've tasted recently.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-10, 12:36 PM
I had okra once.

Once.
I had it twice.

I forgot that that okra and gumbo were the same thing.

But really, how is this different from Paul's dislike of pasta?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

swampyankee
2012-Nov-10, 12:50 PM
I think I've eaten okra by itself once. Once I got past the phlegm-like texture and the mushy consistency, I decided that the only place it belongs is gumbo.

Attempting to pull the thread away from vegetables and into shellfish: steamers (steamed clams) and oysters (raw). Neglecting my general mistrust of raw seafood and meat, I find the looks of oysters completely off-putting, as they look like something that a cow with a cold sneezed out[1]. I just don't like the texture of steamers.

I do, of course, eat clams, fried (with the bellies; I'm a New Englander), in chowder, in fritters, and on pizza (white clam pie: yummy!). Just not steamed or raw.


[1] I did not invent this a simile. I first heard it from a co-worker when I was doing Catia programming at a company in Norwich, Connecticut. His phrase was, if I recall, "I won't eat anything that looks like it was sneezed from a cow's nose."

swampyankee
2012-Nov-10, 01:04 PM
So, someone who is bold in the gustatory sense but timid lingusitically should say "I'll have an octopus. And then, bring me another one."

Or just "I would like some squid."

Incidentally, the tentacles are the best part.

headrush
2012-Nov-10, 01:06 PM
I was at the cafeteria at Peace Park in Hiroshima. Not speaking a word of Japanese, I didn't fancy my chances at the counter so I went to the vending machines instead. After much deliberation (based on the pictures shown for each product) I selected what appeared to be dumplings in some sort of gravy. I paid, they came out hot and I tucked in.
Unfortunately, they were extremely chewy dumplings and on closer inspection, each one had its own sucker !
Yes, it was diced tentacle. I still finished it, but I hope to never repeat that experience.

At a restaurant in New Orleans, I had a bowl of Gumbo, which I was enjoying until I found my first whole shell. After that I was a little more cautious.

Trebuchet
2012-Nov-10, 03:13 PM
I forgot that that okra and gumbo were the same thing.



They're not. Okra is a vegetable, commonly used to thicken gumbo, which is a stew. Gumbo may alternatively be thickened with file (fee-lay) powder, which as I recall is made from a certain tree bark.

A few years ago one of my co-workers brought his lunch from the company cafeteria back to his desk to eat. He's from the Southwest, and had gotten the soup because it had jalapenos in it. He complained it wasn't spicy. When I went down a bit later, I looked at the soup and discovered it was gumbo. The "jalapenos" were actually okra!

DonM435
2012-Nov-10, 04:39 PM
I usually cut a pie into eight slices.

I cut a pie into four slices. I could never eat eight.


;)

Gillianren
2012-Nov-10, 05:20 PM
They're not. Okra is a vegetable, commonly used to thicken gumbo, which is a stew. Gumbo may alternatively be thickened with file (fee-lay) powder, which as I recall is made from a certain tree bark.

Sassafras, I believe.

Arneb
2012-Nov-10, 06:44 PM
I went to dinner in Madrid once with my wife. Having forgotten the dictionary and being shy about my shortcomings in Spanish, I just looked up something under "Carnes", and thought, hey, Callos a la Madrilena seem to be a good choice to start a vacation in Madrid. Also, less expensive than the rest. When it arrived, I knew I had made a mistake. I got through them, but I think it will be a one-off.

Paul, nice one about the omelette...

And of course, I love me some slices of salami in natural casing.

Tinaa
2012-Nov-10, 07:08 PM
I see several things in the grocery store here that I won't eat. Tripas, whole hogs heads, kidneys, menudo, etc. are at the top of the list. I am also careful about from whom I buy tamales. I'd eat bugs - have already have riding down the road on the Harley. Okra is pretty good - fried or boiled.

ETA: I have eaten calf fries and turkey fries. Not my favorite but not bad.

Solfe
2012-Nov-11, 04:31 AM
I will never drink flavored coffee. It invokes a gag reaction for some strange reason. It is completely weird.

Cottage Cheese does the same to me, but I know the reason for it. When I was a kid, my grandmother placed a small bowl of cottage cheese on the counter and opened the freezer for something. Seeing the scoop of white stuff and the freezer door open, I assumed it was ice cream or yogurt and asked for a taste. It was the lack of ice cold and texture that got me, I don't even remember what it tasted like. I ran in circles looking for some place to get rid of it.

I am sure I could eat it, but it never occurs to me to try since that event.

Ara Pacis
2012-Nov-11, 07:11 AM
I cut a pie into four slices. I could never eat eight.


;)

*rimshot*

About cabbages..., a family to which brussel sprouts and broccoli and cauliflower belong, I find they are best when cut into florets or sprouts in half, and tossed in olive oil, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper and roasted in the oven. Brussel sprouts are also much improved by a frying in bacon grease, and a garlic and cream sauce.

Jens
2012-Nov-11, 08:20 AM
I had real difficulty getting my English Language students to accept that "sheep" is both singular and plural.
"One sheep," I said, counting off on my fingers, "two sheep, three sheep, four sheep..."
"What if you have fifty?" one student asked.
"Fifty sheep," I answered, receiving a skeptical look in response.


What about 51?

Jens
2012-Nov-11, 08:24 AM
I was at the cafeteria at Peace Park in Hiroshima. Not speaking a word of Japanese, I didn't fancy my chances at the counter so I went to the vending machines instead. After much deliberation (based on the pictures shown for each product) I selected what appeared to be dumplings in some sort of gravy. I paid, they came out hot and I tucked in.
Unfortunately, they were extremely chewy dumplings and on closer inspection, each one had its own sucker !
Yes, it was diced tentacle. I still finished it, but I hope to never repeat that experience.

Takoyaki! They're actually quite tasty, and the piece of tentacle in each piece is pretty small usually. The octopus doesn't really have any taste since it's smothered so much in the sauce.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-11, 09:54 AM
What about 51?

:)

Jim
2012-Nov-11, 09:04 PM
... Cottage Cheese does the same to me ...

And I like cottage cheese. It's best with some fruit slices - peaches, pears, Mandarin oranges - but good alone, too.

Buttercup
2012-Nov-11, 09:08 PM
And I like cottage cheese. It's best with some fruit slices - peaches, pears, Mandarin oranges - but good alone, too.

Mmm-hmmm! :) Prefer the small-curd regular cottage cheese (no low- or no-fat). And with sliced cling peaches (from a can) with its heavy syrup. :p Sometimes fruit cocktail as well (with the cherry!).

Now you've gone and given me a craving. :cry: ;) But I'm not going back to the grocery store today.

Tinaa
2012-Nov-11, 10:41 PM
Cottage cheese with pimentos, purple onions and a little mayo. Yum!

Gillianren
2012-Nov-12, 12:37 AM
Proving once again that there's no accounting for taste.

Durakken
2012-Nov-12, 01:00 AM
There are a lot more things in this universe that I wouldn't eat than there are that I'm willing to eat...

That being said... If scientists could make a concoction that would give me all my nutrients, taste good, be super easy to prepare (or not need preparation at all), and possibly have more than 1 flavor i'd probably eat only that

Noclevername
2012-Nov-12, 01:19 AM
That being said... If scientists could make a concoction that would give me all my nutrients, taste good, be super easy to prepare (or not need preparation at all), and possibly have more than 1 flavor i'd probably eat only that

They have, it's called take-out. :)

Durakken
2012-Nov-12, 01:26 AM
They have, it's called take-out. :)

unfortunately not... i wished it were like that

swampyankee
2012-Nov-12, 02:04 AM
unfortunately not... i wished it were like that

You have to find the right take-out ;)

orionjim
2012-Nov-12, 02:10 AM
There are a lot more things in this universe that I wouldn't eat than there are that I'm willing to eat...

That being said... If scientists could make a concoction that would give me all my nutrients, taste good, be super easy to prepare (or not need preparation at all), and possibly have more than 1 flavor i'd probably eat only that

Sort of on the line of Noclevername's response -

Back in the early 70’s there was a program called “The Great American Dream Machine” hosted by Marshall Efron who made a Morton Cream Pie.

I found it on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHLPm5XHDPw

Jim

Jim
2012-Nov-12, 12:54 PM
... If scientists could make a concoction that would give me all my nutrients, taste good, be super easy to prepare (or not need preparation at all*), and possibly have more than 1 flavor i'd probably eat only that

Pizza. (*Frozen pizza.)

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-12, 02:35 PM
Mayonnaise on cottage cheese???!!!!

That has *got* to be the basis of a story.

I've many times considered meals consisting of foods
all of the same color. White being probably the most
easily accomplished. But it would be very carbohydrate
heavy. Potatoes, rice, milk, cottage cheese, ice cream,
egg whites, white bread, mayo, chicken breast, salt,
sugar, etc....

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Gillianren
2012-Nov-12, 06:31 PM
I see plenty of protein and fat on that list.

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-12, 06:52 PM
And I'd add cod.

(That's cod as in the fish, not the Call of Duty game.)

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-12, 07:38 PM
Ah, yes! White fish in general. And I thought of
cauliflower a few minutes ago. Leaving both of those
off was a result of not consulting the list of variously-
colored foods I made sometime in the last two years.
I wonder which computer I put it on... and whether I
listed pasta under "white".

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-12, 08:01 PM
I found the list. Fish was the first item in the "white"
category. I didn't have cottage cheese, cauliflower,
pasta, or white bread, so I added them:


coffee, licorice

fish, chicken breast, eggs, potatoes, rice, pasta, white bread,
cauliflower, cucumbers, coconut, milk, cottage cheese, vanilla
ice cream, sugar, salt

tomatoes, ketchup, beets, apples, cherries, strawberries,
cranberries, watermelon, wine

ham, shrimp, strawberry ice cream

carrots, squash, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, cantaloupe, oranges

beef, bread, toast, cereal, baked beans, mushrooms, nuts, figs,
dates, chocolate, coffee, cinnamon, brown sugar, caramel, cola

maize, chick-peas, wax beans, bananas, lemons, casaba melon,
mustard, butter, honey, cider, beer

lettuce & salad greens, celery, asparagus, bell peppers, olives,
peas, green beans, broccoli, brussels sprouts, honeydew melon

grapes, blueberries


-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

HenrikOlsen
2012-Nov-12, 09:26 PM
You can put chocolate in the black and white categories as well.

NEOWatcher
2012-Nov-13, 06:19 PM
That being said... If scientists could make a concoction that would give me all my nutrients, taste good, be super easy to prepare (or not need preparation at all), and possibly have more than 1 flavor i'd probably eat only that
Soylent green?
After all, you do have the varieties soylent red and soylent yellow even if they aren't as nutritious.

swampyankee
2012-Nov-13, 11:12 PM
More stuff I won't eat:

Peas, especially from cans (disgusting little squishy blobs)
Pea soup. Pre-squished blobs
Turnips
Mayonnaise

Trebuchet
2012-Nov-14, 01:01 AM
You are NOT dissing on pea soup! It's lovely. Especially with a little bacon in it. The deli downstairs from my office used to have pea soup on Wednesdays. That was the day I never brought my lunch. And there'd be a line.

SeanF
2012-Nov-14, 01:21 AM
Campbell's split pea with ham soup.

Mmm mmm good.

:)

Gillianren
2012-Nov-14, 01:41 AM
You are NOT dissing on pea soup! It's lovely. Especially with a little bacon in it. The deli downstairs from my office used to have pea soup on Wednesdays. That was the day I never brought my lunch. And there'd be a line.

One of the things I insisted on during the Great Dollhouse Road Trip last summer was a stop at Pea Soup Andersen's.

Trebuchet
2012-Nov-14, 01:52 AM
I should have mentioned that pea soup is pretty close to the only way I like peas. Or pease, as they used to spell it. Although I'll admit that sugar peas straight off the vine and eaten pod and all are not too bad!

swampyankee
2012-Nov-14, 04:00 AM
Do you remember all the negative comments about brussels sprouts? That's about how I feel about peas. But I did notice nobody defended turnips...

Buttercup
2012-Nov-14, 04:18 AM
Oysters (raw especially, or otherwise).

Beef tartare (even if I could eat regular meat).

Octopus or squid (though I might try calamari sometime).

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-14, 04:25 AM
It was rather astonishing to me how good that awful-looking
pea soup tasted when I finally tried it for the first time since
childhood.

Ooo. I just thought about the color of pea soup and the color
of tomato soup made with milk. Mix them togeth... Urkgh...

-- Sorry, sorry, in Minneapolis

Van Rijn
2012-Nov-14, 07:24 AM
I can't stand cantaloupe. It's usually easy enough to avoid, but I've been annoyed occasionally when at some get-together somebody puts cantaloupe in fruit salad. A fruit salad with cantaloupe might as well be cantaloupe - it overpowers everything else. What a waste of otherwise edible food.

swampyankee
2012-Nov-14, 01:44 PM
Oysters (raw especially, or otherwise).

Beef tartare (even if I could eat regular meat).

Octopus or squid (though I might try calamari sometime).

Umh, Buttercup, you do realize that calamari is squid?

Buttercup
2012-Nov-14, 01:54 PM
Umh, Buttercup, you do realize that calamari is squid?

Yes. :) I was indicating I'd make an exception to try it. Looks like onion rings. :p

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-14, 06:35 PM
Van Rijn,

Sometimes (often?) cantaloupe has a sort of chemical taste.
A strong taste of ketones or alcohols or esters or something.
Sort of an artificial fruity taste. Is that the problem for you?

Are muskmelon or honeydew any different?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Gillianren
2012-Nov-14, 06:39 PM
I should have mentioned that pea soup is pretty close to the only way I like peas.

Likewise. I have long since given up explaining my food tastes to anyone, because they made so little sense that way.

Trebuchet
2012-Nov-14, 08:32 PM
Van Rijn,

Sometimes (often?) cantaloupe has a sort of chemical taste.
A strong taste of ketones or alcohols or esters or something.
Sort of an artificial fruity taste. Is that the problem for you?

Are muskmelon or honeydew any different?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

As far as I know, "muskmelon" and "cantaloupe" are generally synonymous in the United States. "Cantaloupe" refers to something different in Europe.

Buttercup
2012-Nov-14, 08:34 PM
Apparently in Australia (or parts of it), cantaloupes are called "rock melon."

"Muskmelon" comes from the variety grown in/near Muscatine, Iowa. :)

Paul Beardsley
2012-Nov-14, 10:05 PM
Another thing I'd never eat is my own digestive system, for obvious reasons - it would hurt!

krismont
2012-Nov-15, 12:01 AM
Chicken feet

Van Rijn
2012-Nov-15, 08:48 AM
Van Rijn,

Sometimes (often?) cantaloupe has a sort of chemical taste.
A strong taste of ketones or alcohols or esters or something.
Sort of an artificial fruity taste. Is that the problem for you?


It's been a very long time since I attempted to eat cantaloupe so I couldn't give many details. I can just say it has a strong flavor I do not like at all. I don't really care to smell it either.



Are muskmelon or honeydew any different?


Honeydew is green. When I tried one, it was a bit sweeter than the cantaloupe I'd had, but was very similar in flavor though perhaps not quite as strong. Those would be the main differences to me. I'm not very familiar with the term "muskmelon."

Ara Pacis
2012-Nov-15, 11:58 AM
You guys are making me hungry with all this talk of food you won't eat but that I would. I'm off to get my hands on some melons.

swampyankee
2012-Nov-15, 01:06 PM
Yes. :) I was indicating I'd make an exception to try it. Looks like onion rings. :p

I'm not a big fan of squid (or calamari), but it is quite good fried. There used to be a restaurant near where I live that did a very nice squid tempura.

I'd recommend avoiding the "Rhode Island Style Calamari" at Jasper White's Summer Shack; everyone I know who has had them say they are much greasier, and less tasty, than those you'd get at just about any clam shack.

SeanF
2012-Nov-15, 02:46 PM
I'm off to get my hands on some melons.
:surprised:

This needs to be cross-posted in the "I didn't mean that the way it sounded...." thread. :D

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-15, 03:29 PM
I was going to say that I thought he handled it very well.

Hey! I did just say it anyway!

I agree that cantaloupes are muskmelons. I trusted the list
of foods I made a few years ago, and I had listed cantaloupe
and muskmelon separately. I obviously need to research it
in greater depth.

A website at Texas A&M says:



The most popular type of muskmelon in America is the small,
oval, heavily netted kind commonly called a cantaloupe. All
cantaloupes are muskmelons, but not all muskmelons are
cantaloupes.

A Spanish writer of 1513 recognized the extremes of quality
commonly found in the fruits of this plant and said: "If it is
bad, it is a bad thing, we are wont to say that the good are
like good women, and the bad like bad women."

The frequent occurrence of poor flavor within the species
doubtless explains why its culture spread no more rapidly
than it did.
Before I found that page and was trying to think what to say,
I thought of the little girl with the curl right in the middle of
her forehead. When she was good she was very, very good,
but when she was bad she was horrid.

Same for strawberries as for cantaloupe. Good strawberries
are heaven on Earth. Bad strawberries are terrible.

On the other hand, good peas are just peas, and bad peas
can be used to make acceptable pea soup.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Moose
2012-Nov-15, 04:27 PM
:surprised:

This needs to be cross-posted in the "I didn't mean that the way it sounded...." thread. :D

No kidding. I could only narrow the tellable-on-CQ jokes down to the better forty or so.

Ara Pacis
2012-Nov-17, 07:26 AM
hehe

boppa
2012-Nov-17, 08:24 AM
A phrase I remember hearing over and over in my childhood: "Great Grandaddy liked beets!". I'll eat them pickled, in small quantities, with a salad, but otherwise I'll pass. Great Grandaddy not withstanding. And even though I actually remember meeting him.

Liver is ok once in a while. Broccoli, on the other hand....

Beetroot- a vile conspiracy to enslave humaskind...

Broccoli is a vomit inducing green weed imho

However liver is actually quite nice, I usually have it once or twice a week

kentucky fried duck- that's a truly obnoxious fast food- the only thing it's good for is if you have `toilet' issues- kfc will get that sorted quick smart...

many of my coworkers seem to suffer the kfc/day off problem...

every time they eat it, they take the next day off...

boppa
2012-Nov-17, 08:45 AM
Apparently in Australia (or parts of it), cantaloupes are called "rock melon."

"Muskmelon" comes from the variety grown in/near Muscatine, Iowa. :)

Actually I'd say all parts of it ;-)

rockmelons is the name for it- I have `heard' of cantalopes (or however you spell it- spell-check doesn't like any variation of it-even in the quote)

I have been in every mainland state here and its always seen in the supermarkets as rockmelons (when its available)

IMHO- its okish- but waaay overpriced- I'd rather fresh mangos or watermelon anyday
(even kiwi fruit has a nicer taste than rockmelons- its always bitter to me and not really that nice- even mixed with icecream its only on the `yeah- rather something else tho' list

Jeff Root
2012-Nov-17, 09:44 AM
I had vanilla ice cream on top of cantaloupe about two months
ago, and I vaguely recall that it didn't work. Even though I only
vaguely recall that it didn't work, I very clearly recall saying at
the time that it didn't work.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Strange
2012-Nov-19, 10:36 PM
But the real question is, how acceptable is octo-pie?

Or octopus balls (takoyaki) ...

Jens
2012-Nov-20, 02:31 AM
Or octopus balls (takoyaki) ...

So how many balls do octopuses have? :)

BTW, though, we have a takoyaki maker at home!

Trebuchet
2012-Dec-04, 03:54 PM
Bump! Because I am SO in agreement with Rat in today's Pearls Before Swine (http://www.gocomics.com/pearlsbeforeswine/2012/12/04)! Fortunately, those seem to be a trend whose time has passed.

Gillianren
2012-Dec-04, 04:03 PM
When I was in college, the deli wasn't serving sandwiches with sprouts anymore because there were contamination issues that seem to have been unavoidable. I don't remember details, because I didn't care.

Trebuchet
2012-Dec-04, 04:28 PM
When I was in college, the deli wasn't serving sandwiches with sprouts anymore because there were contamination issues that seem to have been unavoidable. I don't remember details, because I didn't care.

Is that because you weren't eating them anyhow?

After I posted I started remembering there were some highly publicized cases of sprouts contaminated with e-coli or salmonella. Perhaps that's why they're not so common any more. Or perhaps I just eat at the right restaurants!

Gillianren
2012-Dec-04, 04:55 PM
That is definitely because I wasn't eating them anyhow. As I think I've told you, I'm a fussy eater, and just the thought of eating sprouts has always been unappealing to me on a textural level.

Jim
2012-Dec-04, 06:15 PM
Man, I live dangerously. When we go to the salad bar, I make mine with fresh spinach and sprouts.

Moose
2012-Dec-04, 06:20 PM
My college cafeteria had a recipe called "Bubbly Bake". Which I never ate and never will, just to keep this vaguely on topic. Bubbly Bake was a vegetarian dish. Oh, not because it was for vegetarians; not even the FSM knew what it was actually made of. No, it was a vegetarian dish. I once caught it grazing on the lettuce.

We also wondered abut the vegetarian on staff who was there in the spring, but wasn't by summer's end. Oh, the rumors (that I started)...

/ And all hail Kayleegeddon, Bringer of Typos.