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trinitree88
2012-Nov-25, 04:53 PM
Tha authors propose a new methodology for determing neutrino properties by their interactions with small samples of atoms and molecules in a new scheme. SEE:http://arxiv.org/pdf/1211.4904.pdf
or SEE:http://arxiv.org/abs/1211.4901

antoniseb
2012-Nov-25, 05:51 PM
Tha authors propose a new methodology for determing neutrino properties by their interactions with small samples of atoms and molecules in a new scheme. ...

Wow, 85 pages, and not many of them are easily ignored. I didn't read enough to see if there are holes in the idea, but the concept of doing neutrino spectrometry with small numbers of atoms seems too-good-to-be-true. Can you tell us something about why it might not be crazy?

trinitree88
2012-Nov-26, 10:14 PM
Wow, 85 pages, and not many of them are easily ignored. I didn't read enough to see if there are holes in the idea, but the concept of doing neutrino spectrometry with small numbers of atoms seems too-good-to-be-true. Can you tell us something about why it might not be crazy?

antoniseb. Yep. These guys have been at this for some time, have published peer reviewed papers for years (most of the names are pretty familiar in the neutrino literature to me), and the sensitivity of neutrino experiments continues to improve with each generation. The intersection of new experimental methods and new theory keeps surprising...as it should. Neat. pete

edit: the following names are all familiar to me from past reading...no slight intended to those that are newer,please...Atsushi Fukumi, Kyo Nakajima, Itsuo Nakano, Hajime Nanjo, Minoru Tanaka, Takashi Taniguchi, Takuya Yamaguchi, Akhiro Yoshimi, Motohiko Yoshimura

Cougar
2012-Nov-27, 02:14 AM
These guys have been at this for some time....

I noticed the lead author is from the Kawasaki College of Allied Health Professions in Okayama, which I thought a little odd, but I take your word on neutrino matters.

I lived in Ookayama for a year, which is part of Tokyo and home of the Tokyo Institute of Technology (wife took a visiting professorship there for a sabbatical). A long way from Okayama! I did a lot of painting, photography, and a little technical editing for the profs. Boy, did they need it! That paper looks pretty well written... and pretty well beyond my ken.

Jens
2012-Nov-27, 02:50 AM
I noticed the lead author is from the Kawasaki College of Allied Health Professions in Okayama, which I thought a little odd, but I take your word on neutrino matters.

That's not actually the lead author. The names are in alphabetical order, and the lead author is the person named Sasao, from the University of Okayama (there's a mark next to his name, and the email address given is his).

Strange
2012-Nov-27, 08:43 AM
I lived in Ookayama for a year, which is part of Tokyo and home of the Tokyo Institute of Technology

That should really be Oookayama! (Based on the kanji; I don't if it is really pronounced like that though.)

Sorry. Back to neutrinos...

Cougar
2012-Nov-27, 02:07 PM
That should really be Oookayama! (Based on the kanji; I don't if it is really pronounced like that though.)

Ookayama Station has the English with just two o's. (Jeez, googlemaps shows that sure has been built up!) It was usually pronounced oh-oh-kayama. Now, as I recall, one taxi driver said oh-oh-OH-kayama. I thought he was being funny.

Sorry. Back to neutrinos.

Cougar
2012-Nov-27, 02:09 PM
That's not actually the lead author. The names are in alphabetical order, and the lead author is the person named Sasao, from the University of Okayama (there's a mark next to his name, and the email address given is his).

Ah, thanks for the correction.

Jens
2012-Nov-28, 12:14 AM
Ookayama Station has the English with just two o's. (Jeez, googlemaps shows that sure has been built up!) It was usually pronounced oh-oh-kayama. Now, as I recall, one taxi driver said oh-oh-OH-kayama. I thought he was being funny.


He may have been being funny, because you wouldn't put the accent on the third syllable like that. It is actually pronounced o-o-o-ka-yama in Japanese, but it's really that the first "o" is long, and then the second is short. So it's more like Ooh-okayama. It would be strange to pronounce it in Japanese with just two "o" sounds, because then it would mean something different (small hill instead of big hill!).

Also, I think that on the Japanese sign (I'm looking at the photo in the Wikipedia article) there's a macron over the first O, and in any case the hiragana above the kanji clearly has three "o"s.

And by the way, I used to live around there too. A long time ago I lived in Ishikawadai, which is on a different line, but I used to ride my bike to Okusawa and get on the train there.

trinitree88
2012-Nov-28, 12:09 PM
He may have been being funny, because you wouldn't put the accent on the third syllable like that. It is actually pronounced o-o-o-ka-yama in Japanese, but it's really that the first "o" is long, and then the second is short. So it's more like Ooh-okayama. It would be strange to pronounce it in Japanese with just two "o" sounds, because then it would mean something different (small hill instead of big hill!).

Also, I think that on the Japanese sign (I'm looking at the photo in the Wikipedia article) there's a macron over the first O, and in any case the hiragana above the kanji clearly has three "o"s.

And by the way, I used to live around there too. A long time ago I lived in Ishikawadai, which is on a different line, but I used to ride my bike to Okusawa and get on the train there.

People traveling everywhere, and intersecting later in lives. I had a student travel to Japan a few summers ago because she was very independent, and fascinated with their culture....and she became friends with a lot of people in Fukijima, just before the earthquake/tsunami event.

As for the neutrinos, I'm particularly interested in differential cross-sections in some of the solid state stuff. pete