PDA

View Full Version : True Japanese Daily Cooking?



Inclusa
2012-Dec-29, 07:06 AM
As far as Japanese foods are concerned, we most likely think of sushi, udon, ramen.
I believe there are more to Japanese cuisines, though.
I heard that Chinese cooking is really popular in Japan, too.
(Ok, I use a Santoku knife, but it is very similar to a chef's knife in functions.)

jokergirl
2012-Dec-29, 12:52 PM
I've learned quite a bit about Japanese daily food when I was into the Bento craze. Even though Bento is becoming a lot more Westernized. But that might be a good hint for you to base your searches off of.

;)

IsaacKuo
2012-Dec-29, 01:54 PM
My experience of typical daily food is that it's mainly a bowl of plain white rice along with one or more bowls of "stuff" to eat it with. Each of these tends to be something simple, like stir fried beans, or something. I guess the easiest way to put it is to say what it's not. It's not like Chinese food where a bunch of stuff tends to be mixed together. It's not like Indian food where everything must be spiced with a mix of at least five spices. It's simple and separated, mostly.

Swift
2012-Dec-29, 05:13 PM
I heard that Chinese cooking is really popular in Japan, too.
During my one trip to Japan, back in about 1990, one of our customers took us to a Chinese restaurant for lunch. The dishes were similar to dishes I've had in Chinese restaurants in the US, though I vaguely recall subtle differences (I had a similar experience with having Chinese food in France).

Inclusa
2012-Dec-30, 03:37 AM
My experience of typical daily food is that it's mainly a bowl of plain white rice along with one or more bowls of "stuff" to eat it with. Each of these tends to be something simple, like stir fried beans, or something. I guess the easiest way to put it is to say what it's not. It's not like Chinese food where a bunch of stuff tends to be mixed together. It's not like Indian food where everything must be spiced with a mix of at least five spices. It's simple and separated, mostly.

My "daily" cooking skills are mostly Chinese; yep, a dish typically consist of two or more ingredients (if you consider ginger and garlic ingredients). Squid with greens (or any single meat with greens) is considered one of the simplest dish already.


During my one trip to Japan, back in about 1990, one of our customers took us to a Chinese restaurant for lunch. The dishes were similar to dishes I've had in Chinese restaurants in the US, though I vaguely recall subtle differences (I had a similar experience with having Chinese food in France).

Isn't hot and sour pork, ginger beef, simple stir fry usually ubiquitous?

Solfe
2012-Dec-30, 06:33 PM
You guys are making me hungry!

Two of my favorite things are noodles and rice, so I am on an eternal quest to find other things to go with them.

Inclusa
2013-Jan-04, 05:17 AM
I just saw tororo rice in Dorama (Japanese TV drama); it consists of grated (or meshed)) tororo on top of rice, and the tororo is often seasoned with fish and other seasoning.

Jens
2013-Jan-04, 05:41 AM
As far as Japanese foods are concerned, we most likely think of sushi, udon, ramen.


Actually, ramen isn't really Japanese. It's Chinese noodles adapted by Japanese. Otherwise, I think grilled fish is pretty common. And natto on rice. And then side dishes like cucumber with miso sauce or various vegetable combinations. But people eat a lot of Chinese dishes and also Italian dishes at home. Curry is popular, but usually it's Japanese-style curry, which is kind of sweet. And how about things like yakisoba? People do eat that at home.

IsaacKuo
2013-Jan-04, 04:52 PM
I'd say ramen is a Japanese dish, even so. Also Japanese curry rice, which I find amusing because it was, for many years, the only "curry" I had even been exposed to. When I first went to an Indian restaurant, I was shocked that the food bore no resemblance to what I expected.

Only later would I discover that Japanese curry rice was a Japanese take on a British food, "curry", which in turn was adapted from Indian food. Curry rice is a food which wouldn't exist if it weren't for the British empire, and the inability for British soldiers to fully comprehend Indian cuisine, and the Japanese love of taking foreign things and adapting them further. It's an inauthentic take on an inauthentic take on a foreign foreign food.

But that's what makes human culture so wonderful, isn't it? Imagine if everyone were obsessed with "authentic" cuisine back in colonial times, and we'd have so much less variety today.

Inclusa
2013-Jan-05, 04:37 AM
I'd say ramen is a Japanese dish, even so. Also Japanese curry rice, which I find amusing because it was, for many years, the only "curry" I had even been exposed to. When I first went to an Indian restaurant, I was shocked that the food bore no resemblance to what I expected.

Only later would I discover that Japanese curry rice was a Japanese take on a British food, "curry", which in turn was adapted from Indian food. Curry rice is a food which wouldn't exist if it weren't for the British empire, and the inability for British soldiers to fully comprehend Indian cuisine, and the Japanese love of taking foreign things and adapting them further. It's an inauthentic take on an inauthentic take on a foreign foreign food.

But that's what makes human culture so wonderful, isn't it? Imagine if everyone were obsessed with "authentic" cuisine back in colonial times, and we'd have so much less variety today.

Japanese curry typically comes in cube forms, while most other curries come in powder form.