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Tom Mazanec
2004-Nov-05, 05:29 PM
What natural astronomical NAMED object is the largest? Which is the smallest?

Eroica
2004-Nov-05, 05:45 PM
What natural astronomical NAMED object is the largest?
Assuming you're not counting "The Universe", I'm going to guess The Great Wall (http://www.brainyencyclopedia.com/encyclopedia/g/gr/great_wall__astronomy_.html).

Evan
2004-Nov-05, 06:05 PM
Is this a quiz? What constitutes an "object"?

eburacum45
2004-Nov-05, 09:17 PM
Some of the Near Earth objects recently have been pretty small; but how about the various man made satellites and tracked pieces of debris up there; I think they are probably astronomical, in the broad sense of the term...
http://www.space.com/spacewatch/space_junk.html

glen chapman
2004-Nov-08, 01:04 PM
Could the Great Attractor - something drawing the Great Wall towards it, be potentially bigger? 8-[

Andromeda321
2004-Nov-08, 09:13 PM
Not nessecarily, it could just be the most densely packed (but small) object in the universe... :wink:

Makgraf
2004-Nov-08, 09:56 PM
I understand how scientists find out where astronomical objects are and what they look like. But I don't know how they find out what their names are.

:)

Kullat Nunu
2004-Nov-08, 10:27 PM
Hubble's Sphere, "Hubble Bubble", is the region of the universe from which we can get information (same thing as the visible universe). With a radius of 13-14 billion light years (light travel distance; actually this is very complex issue) it is probably the biggest named thing.

And the smallest named thing... I did a little search and found that the named asteroid with largest absolute magnitude (and thus probably smallest size) is (4581) Asclepius, with a diameter of 200-300 meters or so. Some sungrazing comets found by SOHO were smaller (few tens of meters wide, but they're destroyed in Sun's heat). If you accept designations as names, there are some tiny, catalogued asteroids just a few meters wide.

Kaptain K
2004-Nov-09, 01:30 PM
I understand how scientists find out where astronomical objects are and what they look like. But I don't know how they find out what their names are.

:)
Well ... Somebody publishes the name and everybody else finds out when they read the publication! :oops:

JohnW
2004-Nov-09, 04:45 PM
I understand how scientists find out where astronomical objects are and what they look like. But I don't know how they find out what their names are.

:)
It's right there on the label. You just need to know where to look.