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Inclusa
2013-Jan-16, 04:26 AM
Loads of pets have shown up lately in the pet trade; dogs, cats, rabbits, fish (the common aquarium species), guinea pigs and hamsters are definitely the mainstream pets.
Ferrets, fancy rats, chinchillas, gerbils, mice, parakeets, macaws, cockatoos are probably next in line. (Most macaws and cockatoos are long living companions that may live anywhere from 30-70 years in general.)
We are getting quite a few exotic ones lately, especially in the way of snakes and amphibians. A few species of snakes are more acceptable than others, such as ball pythons, garter snakes, corn snakes, and leopard geckos are readily available.
Mammalian pets are by far the most common, though.

BigDon
2013-Jan-16, 08:31 AM
I disagree with your mammalian assessment. :)

Of course I might be the exception.

I'm fifty something now and I've had maybe 12 dogs my whole life.

I had more pet crabs than that.

And guppies? Somewhere around five or six thousand in the last three years alone. Started that thirty years ago.

And my pet flounders! Have I told you about my flounders, Matt, Patty and Flumph?

As a classic example of you can't win sometimes, I went to identify them down to the species level, mainly so I could call them something else. The reason I needed another name was some of my friends are stuck in Beavis and Butthead mode and word flounder seems to amuse them unduely.

Turns out my flounders are Trinectes maculatus, common name...wait for it...the hogchoker.

Yes, I muttered bad words and shook my head. No, I haven't told them yet.

Solfe
2013-Jan-16, 02:31 PM
I find that people range from usual to exotic. A friend of mine has some sort of African centipede or millipede* and she still maintains a thin veneer of normal.

*Don't ask me exactly what it is, the thing is the size of a snake and even thinking about it alarms me.

Inclusa
2013-Jan-17, 07:24 AM
I disagree with your mammalian assessment.

Of course I might be the exception.

I'm fifty something now and I've had maybe 12 dogs my whole life.

I had more pet crabs than that.

And guppies? Somewhere around five or six thousand in the last three years alone. Started that thirty years ago.

And my pet flounders! Have I told you about my flounders, Matt, Patty and Flumph?

As a classic example of you can't win sometimes, I went to identify them down to the species level, mainly so I could call them something else. The reason I needed another name was some of my friends are stuck in Beavis and Butthead mode and word flounder seems to amuse them unduely.

Turns out my flounders are Trinectes maculatus, common name...wait for it...the hogchoker.

Yes, I muttered bad words and shook my head. No, I haven't told them yet.

Don't forget lifespan, size and attention are factors here. May you tell me which crab did you keep?


I find that people range from usual to exotic. A friend of mine has some sort of African centipede or millipede* and she still maintains a thin veneer of normal.

*Don't ask me exactly what it is, the thing is the size of a snake and even thinking about it alarms me.

The largest centipede, the Amazonian giant centipede, is about 30cm long; the largest millipede grows to about 11 inches long. Barbados Threadsnake is about 10.4 cm long for the largest.
(I guess if you talk about snake size centipede or millipede, it has to be a worm snake or blind snake.) Anthill pythons (about 50cm) are pretty small, too.

Solfe
2013-Jan-17, 12:17 PM
The largest centipede, the Amazonian giant centipede, is about 30cm long; the largest millipede grows to about 11 inches long. Barbados Threadsnake is about 10.4 cm long for the largest.
(I guess if you talk about snake size centipede or millipede, it has to be a worm snake or blind snake.) Anthill pythons (about 50cm) are pretty small, too.

That could be it, I am scare of insects, spiders, etc. It looks about 7 feet long to me. :)

NEOWatcher
2013-Jan-17, 06:27 PM
I had more pet crabs than that.
The ones on your body don't count. ;)

DonM435
2013-Jan-18, 01:43 AM
If you believe the movies, about 50 years ago you could leave a tarantula in someone's house and assure their death.

But since then they've become common pets.

(Or so I hear. I sure couldn't have one nearby.)

Jeff Root
2013-Jan-18, 04:35 AM
I've never seen a live tarantula up close without a barrier
between it and me, but a month ago or so I saw the first
few minutes of a Sherlock Holmes movie with Peter Cushing,
and his reaction to a tarantula on somebody's shoulder made
him look pathetic instead of heroic. Pathetic as in abysmal
acting, not a mutuality of feeling. Or at least abysmal
direction. Probably both.

I got to touch one of those huge millipedes last year.
The hard segments of its back feel like smooth wood.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Inclusa
2013-Jan-18, 04:44 AM
Yep, movies exaggerate the venom of tarantulas; while they are somewhat venomous, they are mostly harmless to humans.
(Unfortunately, movies are so popular that their impacts are often greater than real science.)

Solfe
2013-Jan-18, 05:07 AM
My daughter held a tarantula at the science museum. You could actually sense the point where she realized it wasn't a stuffed animal or toy. She put down on the table and slowly backed out of the room.

She told me that "They aren't cute; let's look at the bunnies."

BigDon
2013-Jan-18, 05:11 AM
The ones on your body don't count.

You haven't seen Williard, have you?

I CAN make an interesting revisioning. (I don't like rats.)

Inclusa, I have kept:

Soapbox crabs

Fiddler crabs

Sallylightfoots (feet?)

I've had no luck with land hermit crabs so I don't count them, but I did really well with marine hermits. Including a big guy from the North Sea, who had a big commensural anemone that was very well cared for. But to get the crab to lovingly tend the anemone you have to trick him. If the crab doesn't feel threatened he won't waste his time or energy supporting the anemone, but actually endangering the animal is "less than professional".

So I kept the crab in a double tank setup where the smaller 50 gallon crab tank was above a 240 gallon tank with a couple of six foot long moray eels in it. I had the water from the eel tank circulating through the crab tank and that crab LOVED his stingy sea anemone friend. The crab would transfer the anemone to the next larger shell and it was by watching their relationship that I learned how to safely and effectively remove the unrelated and much larger carpet anemones from the sides of glass aquariums.

Sea anemone's feet are ticklish!

The hermit crab would use his two longest, pointiest legs to gently poke the base of the anemone's foot where it connects to the surface of the old shell from two opposite sides at the same time, working each edge as the anemone withdrew slightly from the contact. When most of the outer circumference of the foot had reared up the anemone would detach.

I used two thin bamboo sticks and did the same thing to even really large carpet anemones and they would fall right off. Man, the things that aren't hard anymore once you know the trick to it.


Plus I've raised crayfish, yabbies, singapore shrimp, brineshrimp, ghost shrimp and technically the terrarium full of pillbugs I kept for a year and a half next to my computer so I could watch them. Rollypolly bugs are in fact crustacians too.

Though crustacians were only a side interest to other creatures.

Still I haven't done the triops things yet and I want to,

plus I have another major critter observatiory is in the works, but I'm going to need some advice on how to contain the little beasties.

HenrikOlsen
2013-Jan-18, 08:45 AM
Still I haven't done the triops things yet and I want to,
Oh dear, that sentence may well have triggered my transition to multi-tank syndrome,. Reading up on them I've come to realize that I wanna!
Especially as there's a couple of species that are native to Denmark and I've found what looks to be a reputable source for their eggs.

SeanF
2013-Jan-18, 01:58 PM
plus I have another major critter observatiory is in the works, but I'm going to need some advice on how to contain the little beasties.
Don't get them wet, and never ever feed them after midnight.

DonM435
2013-Jan-18, 02:15 PM
I've never seen a live tarantula up close without a barrier
between it and me, but a month ago or so I saw the first
few minutes of a Sherlock Holmes movie with Peter Cushing,
and his reaction to a tarantula on somebody's shoulder made
him look pathetic instead of heroic. Pathetic as in abysmal
acting, not a mutuality of feeling. Or at least abysmal
direction. Probably both.

I got to touch one of those huge millipedes last year.
The hard segments of its back feel like smooth wood.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Actually, Cushing's Holmes (in Hound of the Baskervilles, 1959) later explains that the tarantula bite wouldn't have been fatal but for the fact that the intended victim already suffered from heart trouble, something of which the perpetrator must have been aware.

So, Hound director Terence Fisher handled the concept reasonably well. But a few years later, Dr. No director Terence Young fell back into the old instant-death-implied trap

BigDon
2013-Jan-18, 08:59 PM
Back in the early sixties, when I was a first or second grader my father was still a patrolman and this was when bananas were still shipped here in big bunchs and broken up for supermarket sale by the importer.

My Dad responded to a call there where a guy amputated his own right thumb with a machete after a tarantula bite because he thought he had be lethaly envenomated.

My Dad was amazed at the man's ignorance. 22 years old and a new father as well.

You couldn't put thumbs back on until the late 70's. and even nowadays I imagine it would be a tricky re-attachment due to the tarantula venom breaking down the thumb tissue.

DonM435
2013-Jan-18, 09:28 PM
I believe that. My father got his start in business working in grocery stores. One of his stories that fascinated up involved finding a huge, hairy spider while unpacking bananas.

Inclusa
2013-Jan-19, 04:23 AM
BigDon, I guess you love water critters, eh?

BigDon
2013-Jan-20, 03:12 AM
I have a nodding aquaintance with them, yes.

Jim
2013-Jan-20, 06:21 PM
Back in the early sixties, when I was a first or second grader my father was still a patrolman and this was when bananas were still shipped here in big bunchs and broken up for supermarket sale by the importer.

My Dad responded to a call there where a guy amputated his own right thumb with a machete after a tarantula bite because he thought he had be lethaly envenomated. ...

Ah, another sad victim of Day-O Syndrome (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day-O_(The_Banana_Boat_Song)). Curse you, Harry Belafonte!

caveman1917
2013-Jan-20, 06:47 PM
Don't get them wet, and never ever feed them after midnight.

Do you also have to account for daylight savings time with that?

Jeff Root
2013-Jan-21, 01:12 AM
Ah, another sad victim of Day-O Syndrome (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day-O_(The_Banana_Boat_Song)).
Curse you, Harry Belafonte!
I read this several hours ago and followed the link.
It mentions there that the spiders involved are not
tarantulas. I spotted a link from that page to the
page for Shirley Bassey, and followed it. There it
said that one of her most successful songs was
"Someday", composed by the Beatles. It said her
cover of it is the only version of a Beatles song that
outsold the Beatles version. I didn't recognize the
title and figured it was a song I wasn't familiar with.

Two or three hours later I was running a tune through
my head, what I think is called "sub-vocalization", for
about ten minutes before I became conciously aware
of it. I noticed two things: I was pretty sure it was
a Beatles song, and it was slow. Not raucous.

I tried for another minute to figure out what song it
could be, and eventually it occurred to me that the
lyrics started with the word "Something"...

My brain scares me sometimes.

It's an extremely exotic pet.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

BigDon
2013-Jan-21, 11:13 PM
Do you also have to account for daylight savings time with that?

Almost all matters fae operate on standard time. Important to know.

Inclusa
2013-Jan-23, 04:51 AM
I guess milk snakes and ball pythons aren't that exotic anymore?

BigDon
2013-Jan-24, 04:50 PM
I have a ball python named Toobie. His full name is Toobias T. Tubepig. (The T. stands for "The")

He got the moniker "tubepig" because before we bought him all we read on ball pythons was they can be hard to feed. Never once had a problem getting him to eat. Bought him just as he got sellable after hatching and now he's well over six feet long. He's had live prey his whole life so he is a very efficient strangler. (Adult mice die in his coils in less than ten seconds.) And he waaaay prefers mice over rats, even at his size. Mice and rats have two very distinct aromas, with rats having a much gamier smell. So I guess he actually prefers the taste of mice.

And since this is going to be read by the likes of R.A.F. and Noclevername...(:))...yes, we tested this. Even using small rats and large mice so as to be the same size, released together. He'll kill the rats, but not consume them.