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View Full Version : Guitar Acquisition Syndrome - no cure



Cougar
2013-Jan-26, 11:37 PM
As I mentioned in some other thread, I came up with the bright idea to get my acoustic guitar-playing dad a Les Paul electric. I researched these things for about a month - jeez, there are a zillion different kinds of Les Pauls - and eventually got him a Gibson Les Paul Studio model, which he's over the moon about. Gibson bought Epiphone back in the 50s and kept it a separate branch, but they're pretty close, even though nice Epiphones cost about 25% of the nicer Gibsons. Anyway, I apparently caught the bug and had to get myself one of these electrics, so I picked up a new cherry Epiphone Dot, which is essentially an inexpensive version of the famed Gibson ES-335. Compared to a Les Paul, it's big - a semi-hollowbody archtop with dual humbuckers. The thing is sweet!

But I couldn't just stop researching these things. I started checking out Epiphones on ebay. I noticed this one finish on an Epi Les Paul Standard - translucent amber. Whoa. This thing was beautiful. I think they stopped making it in 2011, replacing it with the 2012 antique natural with probuckers. You don't see many for sale, presumably because those who have them like them so much. Anyway, that's the one I'd get if somebody was selling it at the right price, and I knew what the right price was because I did the research.

I started checking the ebay 'new listings' a few times a day. Well, one came up. The right price. [eta: a steal!] I had to snap it up. Reportedly a mint condition 2010 Epiphone Les Paul Standard plustop flamed translucent amber. Took 12 agonizing days to get to the Wild West from Florida. I was getting anxious. But it did arrive. Well packed. Not a mark on it. Mint condition! Amazingly gorgeous guitar! :) Plays great, too.

LookingSkyward
2013-Jan-26, 11:40 PM
Nice!

starcanuck64
2013-Jan-29, 12:33 AM
I was actually drooling a little looking at those pictures.

As far as addictions go, guitars are one of the best I think.

Nicolas
2013-Jan-29, 02:29 PM
I have the worst case of Guitar Acquisition Syndrome (member of the Gear Acquisition Syndrome family).

Owns 4 perfectly playable guitars. Cannot play guitar.

BigDon
2013-Jan-29, 05:16 PM
Hey Cougar, my brother is afflicted with it. To the point he's expanding to guitar dirivatives like the uke and banjo. Though he's given up on the banjo because it's messing up his guitar playing as banjos are strung in reverse of guitars. I'll try to PM you some pictures of his baby. Completely replaced electronics and pick ups. Red body with a natural neck, special order red abalone pickguard that cost as much as the guitar itself. Accented with eighteen carat gold tuner knobs and string tightener thingies. (<--guitar knowledge fail.)

Me, I'm the poster child for multiple tank syndrome (Fishtanks, not MBT's).

At one time having eleven aquariums, including one on top of my refridgerator. While maintaining eight terrariums at the same time.

Trebuchet
2013-Jan-29, 05:19 PM
Sounds a little similar to my Catapult Construction Syndrome!

ShinAce
2013-Jan-29, 05:45 PM
They definitely are nice guitars with a nice sound. My ex has one. Great tone and action. The only issue I ever had with it was feedback in live performance. I'm not very experienced as a player, and still young, but I get the impression that humbuckers can suffer from feedback(and it grows FAST!). Never got around to diagnosing the cause of the feedback so I can't really say it was necessarily the guitar.

SRH
2013-Jan-29, 06:51 PM
I own 25 guitars. Yikes!!

Buttercup
2013-Jan-29, 06:55 PM
I've got the same problem, except it pertains to vintage Gothic paperback novels (late 1950s through early 1970s). :rolleyes: Seriously, I have probably 300 titles. :)

starcanuck64
2013-Jan-29, 07:04 PM
They definitely are nice guitars with a nice sound. My ex has one. Great tone and action. The only issue I ever had with it was feedback in live performance. I'm not very experienced as a player, and still young, but I get the impression that humbuckers can suffer from feedback(and it grows FAST!). Never got around to diagnosing the cause of the feedback so I can't really say it was necessarily the guitar.

That can be a result of the pickups being too close to the strings and sometimes resonance within cavities in the guitar body.

flynjack1
2013-Jan-30, 02:32 AM
I have 3 and my better half has 2 more. My favorite electric is my Epiphone Sheraton II. But, I have my eye on 3 or 4 more that I would like!

Nicolas
2013-Feb-01, 12:47 AM
I've got the same problem, except it pertains to vintage Gothic paperback novels (late 1950s through early 1970s). :rolleyes: Seriously, I have probably 300 titles. :)

At one time (as in before selling them) I had the largest collection of peluche smurfs in the world. Over 100 different ones. Thanks to trusting a web service, I no longer have the pics.

danscope
2013-Feb-01, 01:13 AM
Well, if you buy an instrument in good condition and keep it in good condition, it will always be worth as much and quite often " More " money as time goes by. A piece of firewood is just that. An instrument is something else.
Those pet rocks haven't appreciated that much. Corvettes and good guitars have done very well.
And if you don't know how to play guitar, why not have someone show you how to play slide , otherwise known as
"bottleneck" , with the guitar tuned to an open chord. You will learn how to pick , and play the blues , maybe even
Hawaiian slack key. This can be done without too much trouble at all .
" So...take me to the station,
and put me on a train .
I've got no expectation ....
to pass .....through here......again . " From an obscure group called the Rolling Stones

Best regards,
Dan

Cougar
2013-Feb-01, 07:21 PM
My favorite electric is my Epiphone Sheraton II.

Those are nice! I have a couple of those on my ebay watch list. Just to, you know, see what they go for. :liar:

Cougar
2013-Feb-01, 07:22 PM
That can be a result of the pickups being too close to the strings and sometimes resonance within cavities in the guitar body.

You the man!

Cougar
2013-Feb-01, 07:29 PM
I own 25 guitars. Yikes!!

Now, that's a serious case of G.A.S.! For me, this amber Les Paul was supposed to be "medication" to cure me of this debilitating syndrome. But I'm not sure how long the effects of this medication are supposed to last. If I saw a nice Epi Casino for 100 bucks, I would probably just succumb....

starcanuck64
2013-Feb-01, 07:29 PM
You the man!

It was a guess, it could be a lot of different things I guess. With all the electronics, different designs and what not it would probably take a technician to diagnose the issue. Is it wrong that I think of guitars like living beings.:)

Cougar
2013-Feb-01, 08:17 PM
Hey Cougar, my brother is afflicted with it.... Completely replaced electronics and pick ups.

"Modding" a guitar with new pickups, etc., seems to be a common symptom of this disease. My affliction hasn't progressed to that point, however. (Actually, it's kind of the opposite of a disease, isn't it? It makes you feel good.)

Me, I'm the poster child for multiple tank syndrome (Fishtanks, not MBT's).
At one time having eleven aquariums, including one on top of my refridgerator. While maintaining eight terrariums at the same time.

Sounds like a similar bug. Can't have just one.

Hornblower
2013-Feb-02, 01:48 AM
"Modding" a guitar with new pickups, etc., seems to be a common symptom of this disease. (Actually, it's kind of the opposite of a disease, isn't it? It makes you feel good.) My affliction hasn't progressed to that point, however.



Sounds like a similar bug. Can't have just one.

One of my fellow French horn players, formerly principal horn in one of our major orchestras, reportedly owns over 20 horns. I thought I was a bit over the top owning two. He is quoted as saying that the cost of his collection is less than that of one good violin. I wonder if any violinists own analogous collections.

ritchyrev
2013-Feb-02, 07:19 AM
Though he's given up on the banjo because it's messing up his guitar playing as banjos are strung in reverse of guitars.

Hi Don,
The Banjo isn't strung in reverse. On a G tuned Banjo, one of the most common tunings, the strings are tuned (from first) D,B,G,D and the drone is tuned G an octave higher. It is this drone string that is confusing to most guitar players. The B,G,and D strings are exactly the same as standard guitar tuning. The first string is tuned down to D, a tone lower than standard guitar E. The main 4 banjo strings are the same as a guitar tuned for open G slide.

Guitarists tend to try and strum a Banjo like a Guitar, but that high drone string gets in the way. A banjo is not played with the same strumming motion as Guitar. There are quite a few different styles of Banjo picking, Blue grass ( Finger picking) and frail ( old time style) and their variations being common.

My partner has been playing guitar for a long time, and when she bought a Banjo, had no trouble with chords or scale patterns, because it was so simillar to guitar. What she did have to practice a lot was the Frail technique. All the slides, hammer ons, pull offs, bends, vibrato etc. are the same as guitar.


string tightener thingies. (<--guitar knowledge fail.)

They are called Machine heads.

ritchyrev
2013-Feb-02, 08:57 AM
I also have GAS, as in Gear Aquisition Syndrome. My partner and I have 4 Jackson Guitars with EMG active pickups, I have my Gibson Explorer (My baby), she has her Gold Tone Banjo. I also have more effect pedals, amplifiers, speaker boxes, Midi keyboards, Midi computer controllers, computer audio interfaces, computer recording gear etc. than you can poke a stick at. But, I always seem to need more. It's the old " look at that, it's shiny, new, has lots of buttons, I definitely need that"



They definitely are nice guitars with a nice sound. My ex has one. Great tone and action. The only issue I ever had with it was feedback in live performance. I'm not very experienced as a player, and still young, but I get the impression that humbuckers can suffer from feedback(and it grows FAST!). Never got around to diagnosing the cause of the feedback so I can't really say it was necessarily the guitar.

Humbucker pickups don't suffer from feed back any more or less in general than single coil pickups. Humbuckers have 2 coils that are wound so that electrical interference that is common to both coils is cancelled. Hence the term hum bucking. This has the effect of also cancelling some of the high frequency content, which makes the humbucker sound more mellow than a bright single coil. When talking Guitar and Amplifiers, feed back is caused through acoustic coupling and resonant frequencies. Just about any electric guitar will feed back if you crank the amp up, face the speaker, and are in a small room.

An electrified acoustic, hollow or semi hollow body electric will be more prone to feed back generally than a solid body, because there are resonant cavities that don't need much energy to excite. Once this cavity or thin piece of wood is resonating, it transfers energy through the bridge to the strings, to the pickup, to the amp, to the speaker, through the air to your guitar and round again untill you stop it.

The louder a guitar is when unplugged, the more likely it is to have feed back problems. A loud resonating output surface (speaker) also makes a great sound capture surface (microphone)

Pickup height will not really cure feedback problems. The further from the string the pickup is, the less signal is output from the guitar. This means you wont be as loud, so you turn up the amp to get your volume back, and now there is enough energy to start the feed back loop again. There are so many variables involved that it would take pages to explain, but generally, to eliminate feed back, turn down the volume, don't face speakers, adjust equalisers to cut the problem frequency, don't face anything that is bouncing the sound back to you. In small venues this is hard to do. Sometimes you have to find the right spot to stand in and not move or turn around, which is not easy.

Fazor
2013-Feb-02, 01:20 PM
I've got an Epi Studio Dot semi-hollow body electric. It's my fav of the four guitars I have (in fact, it's the only one that's strung and in playing order at the moment.) Nice guitar, and can handle anything from rock, to blues-jazz, to country with it's own voice and flair. It's a little *big* for me (I have small hands), but it's very playable.

Two of my other guitars are Washburn -- a fairly standard electric and an acoustic. I have an attachment for my acoustic, but any time I play one of my friends', I think they all play better. :-P The Wash electric was my first guitar, and is my favorite for "modern" (90's) rock.

The final guitar is a Stagg Jaguar, which is a copy of the I-want-so-bad-but-can't-afford Gibson Jazzmaster. It's got a great feel, but I need to replace the pickups and jack before it could ever be a "show" guitar.

flynjack1
2013-Feb-02, 03:13 PM
Hey Cougar, You wouldn't be disappointed with a Sheraton II. I think it has a great sound and is pretty versatile. I have had some minor neck issues requiring some adjustments, but aside from that it tunes well and seems to hold pretty well. The climate here is hard on new guitars as they cure to the dry air. Frequent neck adjustments aren't to uncommon. While your searching let me know if you see a 61 Telecaster that's not out of the roof in cost. I keep hoping to run across one in an estate sale or something where I could get one at an Earthly price.

Cougar
2013-Feb-02, 05:56 PM
I've got an Epi Studio Dot semi-hollow body electric. It's my fav of the four guitars I have...

I love my cherry Epi Dot, my first electric that I bought new in 2012. Yeah, it's big, especially compared to the little Les Paul. It was not well set up out of the box, so I had my local tech give it a full setup. Now it stays in tune and plays like a dream. The wiring on my new (2010) Les Paul had been modified, reverting to the old style independent volume control when in the middle switch position, so I figured it would also be set up nice. Well, it's close, but the jury's still out. I think I'll have the tech look at it.... uh, next month, after I've paid off last month's credit card bill.


Two of my other guitars are Washburn -- a fairly standard electric and an acoustic.

I've got a couple acoustics, too:


An "Oscar Schmidt by Washburn" - acoustic/electric cutaway, dreadnought style, spruce top, Catalpa sides & back, Rosewood Fingerboard, Mahogany Neck... Several years ago I got this thing brand new off the internet for 100 bucks! For that price, I'm real happy with this guitar. It's black with white binding all around and up the neck. It's got a very nice, subtle ring of mother of pearl around the soundhole. I just restrung it with 0.10s and it plays great, though still harder action than the electrics.


An early 70s Epiphone FT-160 'Texan' 12-string, sunburst, mahogany neck, sides, & back with a spruce top. My brother got it new in Hong Kong probably 25 years ago, and it's probably been played a total of 3 hours since then. The action was a mile high, and fortunately it's got an adjustable bridge, and the bolt-on neck makes it easy to pull off of there and stick in a shim if need be. I also took this down to my local tech to make the adjustments and put new strings on it. When I got it back, man, this is a nice 12-string! Too bad it's not a 1960s Texan 6-string, which I see on ebay are worth 4 to 5 grand. This is only worth 1/10 of that. But I ain't selling it. I'm happy playing it.

Cougar
2013-Feb-02, 06:20 PM
Hey Cougar, You wouldn't be disappointed with a Sheraton II. I think it has a great sound and is pretty versatile.

And they look great. But I must resist. Does Vitamin C help?

BigDon
2013-Feb-02, 07:10 PM
Thank you for the reply Mr. Rev.

Well, my brother wants me to learn the banjo since he bought a nice one and I have no quitar experiance to unlearn.

And I have THIS place three blocks down the street. http://www.bronsteinmusic.com/

A world class music store. Whenever big name venues come to town the odds are better than 35% that if you hang out there you'll run into them or their reps, if you know the band well enough to recognize them.

Much more logical than waiting for them at a restarant down town.

They have great music teachers there and they have been helping out the local schools with donations and discounts since before *I* was born.

snodgrass
2013-Feb-03, 02:08 AM
As I mentioned in some other thread, I came up with the bright idea to get my acoustic guitar-playing dad a Les Paul electric. I researched these things for about a month - jeez, there are a zillion different kinds of Les Pauls - and eventually got him a Gibson Les Paul Studio model, which he's over the moon about. Gibson bought Epiphone back in the 50s and kept it a separate branch, but they're pretty close, even though nice Epiphones cost about 25% of the nicer Gibsons. Anyway, I apparently caught the bug and had to get myself one of these electrics, so I picked up a new cherry Epiphone Dot, which is essentially an inexpensive version of the famed Gibson ES-335. Compared to a Les Paul, it's big - a semi-hollowbody archtop with dual humbuckers. The thing is sweet!

But I couldn't just stop researching these things. I started checking out Epiphones on ebay. I noticed this one finish on an Epi Les Paul Standard - translucent amber. Whoa. This thing was beautiful. I think they stopped making it in 2011, replacing it with the 2012 antique natural with probuckers. You don't see many for sale, presumably because those who have them like them so much. Anyway, that's the one I'd get if somebody was selling it at the right price, and I knew what the right price was because I did the research.

I started checking the ebay 'new listings' a few times a day. Well, one came up. The right price. [eta: a steal!] I had to snap it up. Reportedly a mint condition 2010 Epiphone Les Paul Standard plustop flamed translucent amber. Took 12 agonizing days to get to the Wild West from Florida. I was getting anxious. But it did arrive. Well packed. Not a mark on it. Mint condition! Amazingly gorgeous guitar! :) Plays great, too.

For solid body fans and fans of the Les Paul in particular I've seen lots of musicians subsequently gravitate toward Carvins for obvious reasons. http://www.carvinguitars.com

I do the jazz thing and like the big hollow bodies. My favorite guitar is my ES 5, actually I own 3. http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=1011045

Sort of the opposite of a Les Paul. One thing we do have in common is the Jones for new axes. I own over 40 guitars, mostly good quality instruments. I've been collecting and playing since age 12.

Cougar
2013-Feb-03, 01:11 PM
The Banjo isn't strung in reverse. On a G tuned Banjo, one of the most common tunings, the strings are tuned (from first) D,B,G,D and the drone is tuned G an octave higher.....

The couple sites on the web I checked with agree with you. So that gives you an open G chord. I used to have a cheap, open-back longneck 5-string and had fun playing it. Oh, by "from first," you mean from the highest? Then, yes, the B, G, D are the same as standard guitar tuning; so just the high E is tuned down to D. As I recall, recollection of which could be faulty, I used to leave that high string on E, so it was exactly like the highest 4 strings on a guitar. Apparently I'd tune the drone to D, since about the only tune I knew* was in D. One site I looked at showed 5 different alternative tunings. None of them was the tuning I used!

__________________
* Sandy Bull's "Little Maggie" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGi-6p96ET8)

Cougar
2013-Feb-03, 06:29 PM
I do the jazz thing and like the big hollow bodies.....

Please. I'm very impressionable. [ebay item (http://www.ebay.com/itm/11-Epiphone-Broadway-Hollow-Body-Arch-Top-Electric-Guitar-Natural-Finish-/251222414896?pt=Guitar&hash=item3a7e05d630) at $224 after 13 bids (none mine) - with 4 days left]

ritchyrev
2013-Feb-04, 01:42 PM
Oh, by "from first," you mean from the highest?

Hi Cougar,
Yes, the first string is the one closest to your feet, it is also the highest pitch, not counting the drone , which is string 5 . Your tuning of D G B E, (guitar tuning) is not unusual, but with a G drone. No reason it wouldn't sound fine with a D as your tune is in D.

Different tunings allow for different voicings of chords, and easier fingering of some chords. It all depends on what style and sound you are after.

There seems to me to be more tuning variants for Banjo than any other instrument.

http://zeppmusic.com/banjo/aktuning.htm There are no big picture loads or ads, it is just a big list of banjo tunings.


Cheers.