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Tranquility
2004-Nov-08, 07:58 AM
Hilarious news item on Slashdot (http://apple.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/10/25/2253214&tid=222&tid=179&tid=133&tid=3):


On this approximately 0.05MHz G3 speed emulator, the boot screen has taken 1.5 hours to appear, and the ETA for full boot is almost exactly 1 week! Regular updates are being posted as each milestone in the boot process is reached.

:lol: :lol:

mickal555
2004-Nov-08, 10:33 AM
Whats so funny sounds just like the compputers at school.

Gullible Jones
2004-Nov-09, 12:26 AM
Sounds... Just like my dad's G3. :P
(The thing has constant problems because one of the HDs fails to mount. I wonder why it causes problems though... It's not the System drive, just a large one where MP3s are stored...)

Tranquility
2004-Nov-09, 08:25 AM
Sounds... Just like my dad's G3. :P
(The thing has constant problems because one of the HDs fails to mount. I wonder why it causes problems though... It's not the System drive, just a large one where MP3s are stored...)

Are both hard drives by any chance set up as master? :D

When I got my DVD writer I forgot to set it as slave (I already had another optical drive on the same cable). Both were set to master, it took ages to boot and then only one drive showed up. Such a n00b mistake.

Gullible Jones
2004-Nov-09, 11:13 PM
It doesn't take ages to boot, it just fails to mount one of the drives, a 60 GB Maxtor IDE drive. (A PCI IDE adaptor has to be used, since the G3 is designed for SCSI drives. Which is stupid, because IDE was already the standard at the time the box was built... :roll: But are we to expect intelligence from the corporation responsible for the iSore?)

This does sound like the sort of error my father would make though.

Tranquility
2004-Nov-10, 12:27 AM
My optical drive wouldn't mount too. The thing is, the PC would start and it would lock up for a bit on the screen where it counts the amount of memory and shows what drives you have. It would stay on that screen for about 30 seconds and when it finally boots into Windows you can see only one of the drives.

Might be worth checking out ;)

frenat
2004-Nov-10, 01:26 AM
[quote=Gullible Jones]When I got my DVD writer I forgot to set it as slave (I already had another optical drive on the same cable). Both were set to master, it took ages to boot and then only one drive showed up. Such a n00b mistake.


That's one reason I like to set up everything in my systems as cable select. There can never be conflicts then and with the cables labeled which plug is master and slave I don't get confused either.

Yoshua
2004-Nov-10, 01:44 AM
It doesn't take ages to boot, it just fails to mount one of the drives, a 60 GB Maxtor IDE drive. (A PCI IDE adaptor has to be used, since the G3 is designed for SCSI drives. Which is stupid, because IDE was already the standard at the time the box was built... :roll: But are we to expect intelligence from the corporation responsible for the iSore?)

This does sound like the sort of error my father would make though.

Not stupid at all actually. IDE was an Intel relic that has persisted to this day purely because it is cheap. SCSI was what was used by pretty much everyone else. The downfall to SCSI is it is more expensive to buy the controllers and drives.

However SCSI has advantages over IDE:
- 7-14 devices per controller (depends on the type of controller, RAID controllers can actually go way beyond that limit)
- Can support devices other than just drives such as scanners and printers
- Faster than IDE
- Asyncronous operation of devices. IDE has to syncronize access, it can't run two devices at the same time.
- Drives on a SCSI chain can be hot swapped (added or removed while the machine is in operation)
- SCSI drives tend to be made better and last longer. I have a old 3.2 gig SCSI drive I bought over 10 years ago that still works just fine.

Apple had been using SCSI in macintosh's since the very first model. It's just not a big surprise they would still be using it in the G3. In fact, I believe the higher end Mac's still use it. It's a far superior interface to IDE in terms of capabilities, it's just too expensive for the typical computer user. But for the person buying a high end machine where cost isn't much of an issue, SCSI is a better option.

Robert Andersson
2004-Nov-10, 06:14 PM
Not stupid at all actually. ...

However SCSI has advantages over IDE:
Exactly what I was about to say, but because you did I must take the other side ;). It could be considered stupid to use SCSI, since your avarage Mac user has about zero need for all its advantages (except perhaps the arguably lesser crash frequency). Having said that, I go for SCSI over (E)IDE any day; I need the advantages. :)

Tranquility
2004-Nov-10, 07:02 PM
Dunno, it works for servers and really high performance computing, but I have trouble justifying a 36 GB 15,000 rpm Seagate Cheetah for 330$ for a normal desktop user.