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cjackson
2013-Jan-29, 07:16 PM
This may seem weird, but after a day of acid reflux here goes:

Let's say you could shrink yourself down, and get swallowed alive by a healthy woman -- would her stomach be able to dissolve you bones and all? Or would you suffocate before feeling any considerable burning? Would you even feel any burn at all?

Basically, how would your epidermis react in the environment of the stomach and its juices? Not your esophagus feeling reflux, or your skin coming into contact with diluted vomit, but the internal environment of the stomach.

Just how strong is our stomach acid?

And why a hypothetical woman? Well who wants to discuss a dudes insides?

BigDon
2013-Jan-29, 07:21 PM
So, we're into vore are we?

No, you would need at least a crocodilian or a hyena for complete digestion.

And they can digest horns and hooves as well.

profloater
2013-Jan-30, 12:07 AM
it's around pH 2 or less, enough to burn. Obviously you would suffocate in your rather sexually phrased question because there is a sphincter that allows you to do a head stand without leaking. Not very much air in there. The stomach is skin too but protected with mucous. There are also enzymes strong enough in the acid to digest raw steak. Bones would take a long time so they would pass through. There was a rumour that women with big mouths are attractive to (some) men because they (the men) want to get eaten. But wanting to get digested, sounds alien.

Hornblower
2013-Jan-30, 12:40 AM
It is about a 1 molar solution of hydrochloric acid, which is what you get when diluting one part of reagent concentrated acid with about 10 parts of water. In the chemistry lab we took stringent safety precautions because such a solution is very hard on skin and especially eyes.

Gillianren
2013-Jan-30, 01:58 AM
And why a hypothetical woman? Well who wants to discuss a dudes insides?

Why specify? Why not "a healthy person"?

cjackson
2013-Jan-30, 11:13 AM
Because I'm heterosexual, with a masochistic side, hence my fascination with women's stomachs. It's really supreme dominance in way, but enough about my perversions.

I had read an article where a man had a leak in a feeding tube, and stewed in his juices for a couple of hours, resulting in second or third degree burns over 8 percent of his body. Is that apocrypha? Could you give yourself severe burns with your own gut juice?

Gillianren
2013-Jan-30, 05:06 PM
Because I'm heterosexual, with a masochistic side, hence my fascination with women's stomachs. It's really supreme dominance in way, but enough about my perversions.

You brought them up. By using "person," you wouldn't have. I think we all would have preferred that.

Swift
2013-Jan-30, 06:48 PM
You brought them up. By using "person," you wouldn't have. I think we all would have preferred that.
Yes, "we" would have preferred that. Going forward, no more adult references.

Jens
2013-Jan-31, 04:04 AM
Because I'm heterosexual, with a masochistic side, hence my fascination with women's stomachs. It's really supreme dominance in way, but enough about my perversions.

I had read an article where a man had a leak in a feeding tube, and stewed in his juices for a couple of hours, resulting in second or third degree burns over 8 percent of his body. Is that apocrypha? Could you give yourself severe burns with your own gut juice?

Apparently not (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2263087/).

Romanus
2013-Jan-31, 04:25 AM
BigDon ended this thread. :D

JustAFriend
2013-Jan-31, 03:44 PM
Just how strong is our stomach acid?

Google is your friend.

Stomach acid is so strong that it can dissolve your teeth. Common problem for people with bulimia (https://www.google.com/#hl=en&sugexp=les%3Bepsugrpqhmoffline&gs_rn=1&gs_ri=hp&tok=mVmutUfj59tch23OwuaBAw&cp=10&gs_id=12&xhr=t&q=bulimia+teeth&es_nrs=true&pf=p&tbo=d&sclient=psy-ab&oq=bulemia+te&gs_l=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.41642243,d.eWU&fp=139956e3c17019da&biw=1607&bih=897).

Trebuchet
2013-Jan-31, 04:34 PM
Apparently not (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2263087/).

I think a clarification may be needed here: "Apparently not" appears to be a response to the first question, "Is that apocrypha?", and not to the second one, "Could you give yourself severe burns with your own gut juice?" since the linked article describes exactly that.

You can, of course, also give yourself severe internal burns, which almost killed my wife three years ago.

Infinity Watcher
2013-Jan-31, 05:43 PM
I think a clarification may be needed here: "Apparently not" appears to be a response to the first question, "Is that apocrypha?", and not to the second one, "Could you give yourself severe burns with your own gut juice?" since the linked article describes exactly that.

You can, of course, also give yourself severe internal burns, which almost killed my wife three years ago.

I'm sorry to hear that Trebuchet, I hope she's recovered now. One potential cause of death in people whose gag reflex is absent or significantly weakened is "aspiration pneumonia", one cause of which is when stomach acid refluxes and is subsequently inhaled causing significant damage to the sensitive epithelia of the trachea and lungs.

Trebuchet
2013-Jan-31, 06:02 PM
I'm sorry to hear that Trebuchet, I hope she's recovered now. One potential cause of death in people whose gag reflex is absent or significantly weakened is "aspiration pneumonia", one cause of which is when stomach acid refluxes and is subsequently inhaled causing significant damage to the sensitive epithelia of the trachea and lungs.

That's pretty much what happened to my wife, as well as bacterial pneumonia (Klebsiella) from GI bacteria in her lungs. She also had a major urinary tract infection with GI bacteria, and almost died of septic shock. She's fortunately recovered enough to now have become a caregiver to me!

Infinity Watcher
2013-Jan-31, 06:11 PM
That's pretty much what happened to my wife, as well as bacterial pneumonia (Klebsiella) from GI bacteria in her lungs. She also had a major urinary tract infection with GI bacteria, and almost died of septic shock. She's fortunately recovered enough to now have become a caregiver to me!

I saw your thread, although I don't think I posted in it, for which you have my apologies, I should have wished you well there. Do you think you could file "falling off the roof" in with "things not conducive to good health" in the future? It might help ;) .

Sounds like you've both been through the wringer a bit, I've not had full blown septic shock but I have come close (pretty knife edge as to whether I ended up on ICU I believe) so she has my definite sympathies over that, it is *not* a pleasant experience.

BigDon
2013-Jan-31, 06:34 PM
That's pretty much what happened to my wife, as well as bacterial pneumonia (Klebsiella) from GI bacteria in her lungs. She also had a major urinary tract infection with GI bacteria, and almost died of septic shock. She's fortunately recovered enough to now have become a caregiver to me!

Same thing almost happened to me last November. A big reason I had stopped posting all that time.

I'm glad she is alright Treb, that can make you feel the "twinge of mortality" for sure and that seriously sucks.

Trebuchet
2013-Jan-31, 09:21 PM
Thanks, IW and Don, for your kind words. I'm not only going to include "falling off the roof" in the "things not conducive" file, but getting on the roof in the first place! If nothing else, I've realized I'm not 40 any more!

BigDon
2013-Jan-31, 10:11 PM
Yes, "we" would have preferred that. Going forward, no more adult references.

Whew! I'm glad we have moderators here.

I was about to tease Gillian with a list of words, nearly half of which are Japanese, of the other categories she's missing out on.

All safe for work individually, but once Googled and in context probably would have gotten me some time off. Like a month.

(Wow, that sounded smart alecky at first, didn't it?)

wd40
2013-Feb-04, 10:31 PM
Before the invention of proton-pump inhibitors, men used to have to take carton after carton of 500mg Rennies for short-lived heartburn relief, gross excess consumption of the Calcium therein being believed to have contributed to the epidemic of coronary calcified plaque induced heart attacks in the 60s.

Now one 15mg proton pump inhibiting capsule gives 24 hour relief from the hydrochloric acid fumes that leak through the esophageal valve causing discomfort by reducing acidity up to 90%. No wonder Omeprazole, Lansoprazole, Pantoprazole etc are the highest selling drugs in the world.

cjackson
2013-Feb-06, 07:56 AM
Are there any differences between the GI tracts of human females and males?

HenrikOlsen
2013-Feb-06, 10:10 AM
No.

Jens
2013-Feb-07, 02:46 AM
No.

I would say there are, though not structural, but rather in terms of contents. The GI tracts of men tend on average to have more beer in them, for example. And probably more fatty foods and fewer vegetables. It may be important because I think our gut flora is influenced by what we eat.

Gillianren
2013-Feb-07, 03:46 AM
That probably depends a great deal on where you're sampling--in a college setting, for example, almost everyone has a stomach full of fat and alcohol!

Jim
2013-Feb-07, 01:06 PM
There must be some differences. After all, as everyone knows, ladies are almost never flatulent while with men it's a perpetual and seemingly preferred state.

NEOWatcher
2013-Feb-08, 05:54 PM
Before the invention of proton-pump inhibitors, men used to have to take carton after carton of 500mg Rennies for short-lived heartburn relief, gross excess consumption of the Calcium therein being believed to have contributed to the epidemic of coronary calcified plaque induced heart attacks in the 60s.
And what about before that? How was it handled?
It's just our modern world of fix it, and fix it quickly.

wd40
2013-Feb-09, 05:20 PM
And what about before that? How was it handled?


In the past when food portions were much smaller and higher in protein which tightens the esophageal sphincter, there was no snacking, and lower simple carbohydrates, sugar, nicotine and caffeine that acidify and relax the sphincter, were not available, diet-caused hyperacidity was rarer. Even today, sales of Rennies and Omeprazole in Africa are a fraction of the West's.

HenrikOlsen
2013-Feb-09, 07:12 PM
What on earth gives you the idea that food portions were smaller?

wd40
2013-Feb-10, 01:58 AM
What on earth gives you the idea that food portions were smaller?

Because there was less food to go around.

Before 1900, that this

http://davaoburgers.com/wp-content/uploads/catablog/originals/bb-triple-whammy.jpg

would be a daily staple in the diet of many Americans would have been considered a fantasy.

cjl
2013-Feb-10, 02:20 AM
I'm prety sure that still isn't a staple anywhere.

Gillianren
2013-Feb-10, 03:21 AM
Out of idle curiosity, I Googled "Victorian breakfast." This was one of the first results.

http://www.teapartydiva.com/victorian-era-breakfast-a-feast-of-food-etiquette/

Jens
2013-Feb-10, 05:21 AM
What on earth gives you the idea that food portions were smaller?

I would sort of assume they were, though I haven't spent that much time looking into it. I am pretty sure that food was more expensive vis-a-vis income. I remember that when Henry IV became king (of France), he promised to try to make sure that each family could eat a chicken once a week.

Gillianren
2013-Feb-10, 05:54 PM
What they ate was different, but the other primary difference was that the majority of people were actually working off those calories. If you look at the level of manual labour people used to do, you know that they literally had to eat more than 2000 calories a day to keep going.

Infinity Watcher
2013-Feb-10, 09:56 PM
What they ate was different, but the other primary difference was that the majority of people were actually working off those calories. If you look at the level of manual labour people used to do, you know that they literally had to eat more than 2000 calories a day to keep going.

This is probably something BigDon or one of our other military members could vouch for, I know when I spent some time in the CCF (Combined Cadet Forces, basically an opportunity for teenagers to play soldiers once a week, I think the military put up with us since it was a) good public relations and b) it was an opportunity to try and recruit us) the 24hr ration packs we got issued (which I believe were basically the military cast-offs, we only got boil in the bag stuff a few years after the real military made the switch) on field exercises were something like 3,000 calories on the assumption that you were probably using above average amounts of energy each day in the field. I must agree with Gillianren here (not that that's a rare occurance, Gillianren usually has a good point when she posts), portion *sizes* would probably have been if anything larger in the past when most people were engaged in heavy physical labor, they would have to be, that's thermodynamics: you can't get that energy from nowhere. They would have been different: I believe the most common dish was pottage (basically a kind of grain porridge with whatever vegetables were available plus if you were lucky and/or it was a special occasion meat as well). More recent times (Industrial revolution) are a different matter and portion sizes probably did drop then for the poor but that's a complex matter and of course for the middle class and rich it was a different matter entirely

Jim
2013-Feb-11, 02:32 AM
Out of idle curiosity, I Googled "Victorian breakfast." This was one of the first results.

http://www.teapartydiva.com/victorian-era-breakfast-a-feast-of-food-etiquette/

Which explains why the Victorians are extinct today.

Gillianren
2013-Feb-11, 04:22 AM
More recent times (Industrial revolution) are a different matter and portion sizes probably did drop then for the poor but that's a complex matter and of course for the middle class and rich it was a different matter entirely

Quite. The problem here is that, once again, we have someone trying to make a universal statement when no universal statement is possible. While the average medieval labourer probably ate mostly pottage (or horsebread, which is basically "baked pottage"), the menus from some feasts of that era would make even the most calorie-intensive meal you've ever seen look like dry toast.

NEOWatcher
2013-Feb-12, 04:03 PM
Out of idle curiosity, I Googled "Victorian breakfast." This was one of the first results.
http://www.teapartydiva.com/victorian-era-breakfast-a-feast-of-food-etiquette/
That link explained the indigestion problem very distinctly. I see a lot of restaurants that use the red/white checkered tablecloth nowadays.
I shall not eat at an Italian restaurant again since they are the biggest contributers to the red and white checkered indigestion inducing pattern.

;)

wd40
2013-Feb-13, 11:38 AM
I shall not eat at an Italian restaurant again since they are the biggest contributers to the red and white checkered indigestion inducing pattern.


A case of Italian restaurant "indigestion"?!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNFmyiGW7hg

cjackson
2013-Feb-13, 02:06 PM
I read that females produce less acid, and have slower emptying times: is that true?

Swift
2013-Feb-13, 05:58 PM
I read that females produce less acid, and have slower emptying times: is that true?
I don't know, some of the greatest quantities of stomach acid I've ever had were produced by females. ;)

ToSeek
2013-Feb-13, 06:59 PM
Which explains why the Victorians are extinct today.

I hold out hope that there's a colony remaining on some isolated island or somewhere deep in a forest.

Trebuchet
2013-Feb-13, 07:15 PM
Which explains why the Victorians are extinct today.

Nonsense. There are quite a lot of them just a hundred or so miles from here, in the capital of British Columbia.

When I was in the hospital and my GI system was malfunctioning, they were actively pumping acid & bile out of my stomach for about three days. Nasty looking stuff.

Jens
2013-Mar-27, 02:59 AM
1. you could survive the esophagus trip


I think it would be pretty hard to get into the esophagus in the first place. Not to mention that a human being would not survive another human being being put in their esophagus. Unless you were really, really small.

NEOWatcher
2013-Mar-27, 11:49 AM
I think it would be pretty hard to get into the esophagus in the first place. Not to mention that a human being would not survive another human being being put in their esophagus. Unless you were really, really small.
If you could, it would be a fantastic voyage.

Swift
2013-Mar-27, 12:51 PM
Yes, "we" would have preferred that. Going forward, no more adult references.
I have removed (maybe temporaily) a post by cjackson and am closing this thread while it is discussed in moderator land.

P.S. - After discussion among the moderators this thread is to be kept closed and cjackson was issued an infraction. The removed post will not be restored.