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View Full Version : Calling all aircraft enthusiasts and RC Pilots!!!



BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-09, 04:31 PM
Anyone else out there an RC Pilot? I'm just in the initial stages of learning on my Piper J-3 Cub (http://www.hobbytron.net/J-3-Cub.html). It's just a toy (transmitter is on 27 MHz), but it flies well and has all the points a good trainer needs. It's nothing compared to the two heavylifts I've built, but I wasn't the pilot of either of those.

So far I've lost a couple of weeks before I graduate to something bigger, I had a major crash two weeks ago where I had to rebuild the whole fuselage and gearbox assemblies, and another setback this past weekend from shotty workmanship on the repairs I just made. I apparently forgot to put a washer between the nylon gear that drives the prop and the nylon bushing in the gearbox, well you guessed it similar materials in friction at several thousand RPM...I melted the gearbox, I'm just hoping the motor is still okay.

BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-09, 04:33 PM
We can open this up to an all aircraft discussion if interest is strong enough. I personally love aircraft so much I got my batchelor's degree in designing them, so I'm somewhat biased. The next degree will be a little more general.

Glom
2004-Nov-09, 04:38 PM
Ah, a little remote controlled one.

BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-09, 04:56 PM
Yeah, pilot's license is too expensive (and I'm deathly afraid of heights), but I love to look at planes.

Fidelio
2004-Nov-09, 05:35 PM
If you haven't already seen it you will probably get a kick out of this clip.

http://www.hugi.is/hahradi/bigboxes.php?box_id=51208&f_id=1159[/code][/url]

BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-09, 05:45 PM
If you haven't already seen it you will probably get a kick out of this clip.

http://www.hugi.is/hahradi/bigboxes.php?box_id=51208&f_id=1159[/code][/url]


That is the goal. Though I think I might try a toaster. :wink:

I wonder if that will do my hedges?

Nicolas
2004-Nov-09, 06:27 PM
In my Aerospace Engineering Bachelor, we had some in-flight practicals, including piloting a cessna 172 and a zero G flight in a Cessna Citation 2 business jet (which is a test plane of the local air authorities). Next week I'll fly in the Citation again, this time being demonstrated things like the spin...

Some people here are afraid of flying, it's nice to see them taking calming pills and pulling a stall the moment they touch the 172's steering column :D

Too bad next week's will be the last flight, and we only had the chance of piloting ourselves once. We did make some nice maneuvres though, like 2+G turns and the like. In the Cessna 172, we once flew with the door not shut correctly. In flight (it was winter and we flew at 2000-3000 feet) it was really cold, but we didn't find a cause nor did we mention it to each other. During the landing, the door went open :) Lovely to see concrete zipping by at that speed, and seeing a bit of the little blue smoke plume as the front wheel touched the runway without glass between you and the event :)

I don't own RC planes, I'm more into the real thing. I can't afford a pilot's license, but I'm working on getting lessons arranged... hope it works.

I'm quite interested in planes, as you might have noticed in some of my posts. And airplanes are a subject on which many wrong information is considered "common knowledge"...

That's the nice thing in this BABB, each of us has his own interests and we all learn from each other.

About the RC lawnmower, I think I see airfoils in the pushing bar, but how does it generate a positive Y moment? With only the pushing bars as lifting devices, the thing would go nose down straight ahead. Massive impact. I think the pushing bars are steering and stabilisation devices, the lift is generated somewhere in the lawnmower itself. Any info? From the smoke it looks like a fuel powered plane. I thought I saw the thrust screw in the middle front. Is it maybe tilted to generate lift (boy this would give a low efficiency :) )?

BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-09, 07:17 PM
In my Aerospace Engineering Bachelor, we had some in-flight practicals, including piloting a cessna 172 and a zero G flight in a Cessna Citation 2 business jet (which is a test plane of the local air authorities). Next week I'll fly in the Citation again, this time being demonstrated things like the spin...

We never got to do anything like that in my Aero degree! That must be a lot of fun, even though I'm afraid of heights, flying really doesn't bother me too much (but I don't want to push my luck piloting an airplane and freezing in fear).

In college I did have my intro Space Sciences and Technology class at Cape Canaveral. I've been on the Boeing Delta pad with a Delta IV being prepared for launch in that class! And in the VAB with Discovery. And in the space station processing facility. All while taking a class! It was taught by an Astronaut, Dr. Sam Durrance.


...Lovely to see concrete zipping by at that speed, and seeing a bit of the little blue smoke plume as the front wheel touched the runway without glass between you and the event :)

There's a road here that passes by the business end of the International airport, the toll plaza for the road is at the very end of the landing strip. It's pretty common for the big passenger liners to fly over your car by less than 100 ft! Talk about thrilling!



I don't own RC planes, I'm more into the real thing. I can't afford a pilot's license, but I'm working on getting lessons arranged... hope it works.

I love the real thing, but I prefer to design them. I even dabble in designing my own RC planes.

I grew up in Lakeland, FL which has the second largest air show in the United States and the third largest in the world, behind Paris, France and Oshgosh, WI.




About the RC lawnmower, I think I see airfoils in the pushing bar, but how does it generate a positive Y moment? With only the pushing bars as lifting devices, the thing would go nose down straight ahead. Massive impact. I think the pushing bars are steering and stabilisation devices, the lift is generated somewhere in the lawnmower itself. Any info? From the smoke it looks like a fuel powered plane. I thought I saw the thrust screw in the middle front. Is it maybe tilted to generate lift (boy this would give a low efficiency :) )?

I think the mower deck and the open engine block is the wing.

Argos
2004-Nov-09, 07:18 PM
Anyone else out there an RC Pilot?

Yes, I like to pilot "little ones". Btw, in my group there are (real) 747 pilots who appreciate to fly rubber powered models. Most of the real-scale pilots Iīm acquainted to like to fly rc planes. So, thereīs nothing to be ashamed of.

I actually have a 1.50 meter wingspan J-3, powered by an OS .40 engine (too much for a light all-balsa stick frame). I also have a Toucan trainer (SuperTigre .60) and several gliders. I would recommend a glider for basic training. Unfortunately, I donīt have suitable photos at hand.

darkhunter
2004-Nov-09, 08:03 PM
In my Aerospace Engineering Bachelor, we had some in-flight practicals, including piloting a cessna 172 and a zero G flight in a Cessna Citation 2 business jet (which is a test plane of the local air authorities). Next week I'll fly in the Citation again, this time being demonstrated things like the spin...

Some people here are afraid of flying, it's nice to see them taking calming pills and pulling a stall the moment they touch the 172's steering column :D

Too bad next week's will be the last flight, and we only had the chance of piloting ourselves once. We did make some nice maneuvres though, like 2+G turns and the like. In the Cessna 172, we once flew with the door not shut correctly. In flight (it was winter and we flew at 2000-3000 feet) it was really cold, but we didn't find a cause nor did we mention it to each other. During the landing, the door went open :) Lovely to see concrete zipping by at that speed, and seeing a bit of the little blue smoke plume as the front wheel touched the runway without glass between you and the event :)

I don't own RC planes, I'm more into the real thing. I can't afford a pilot's license, but I'm working on getting lessons arranged... hope it works.

I'm quite interested in planes, as you might have noticed in some of my posts. And airplanes are a subject on which many wrong information is considered "common knowledge"...

That's the nice thing in this BABB, each of us has his own interests and we all learn from each other.

About the RC lawnmower, I think I see airfoils in the pushing bar, but how does it generate a positive Y moment? With only the pushing bars as lifting devices, the thing would go nose down straight ahead. Massive impact. I think the pushing bars are steering and stabilisation devices, the lift is generated somewhere in the lawnmower itself. Any info? From the smoke it looks like a fuel powered plane. I thought I saw the thrust screw in the middle front. Is it maybe tilted to generate lift (boy this would give a low efficiency :) )?

Could this be it? (http://www.pub.nxs.net/dehunt/mower.htm)

edit....um...uh..how do you spell "URL"?... :oops:

BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-09, 08:03 PM
I've enjoyed my little J-3, It's been one rugged little airplane. I've crashed it more times than I care to count and it's ready to fly again by the tim eyou reach the crash site. Now the tide is turning, I have far more good landings now than rough ones.

I'm thinking of upgrading to a neutrally stable mid-wing aircraft sometime after the new year.

enginelessjohn
2004-Nov-10, 09:23 AM
Well ex-RC pilot here... Been facsinated by avaition as long as I can remember, and as a kid my father and I built RC gliders and powered aircraft. Even then I enjoyed flying the gliders more, and the thrill of soaring a thermal for the first time, aged about 11, is still there. (Btw I'm 33 now) Joined the Air Cadets at 13 and got to fly in a glider. A Slingsby T21 Sedbergh, a huge barge of a thing, with some young god who could fly at the controls. I had to tap the altimeter to keep it reading.... Also had about half a dozen flights in Chipmunks, and experienced aerobatics. Roller coasters seem a bit tame after that.....

Still flew RC models, as well, and got the control reversal sorted out with an off road buggy. The big adantage is when the brain shuts down you can stop and no damage is done. Aeroplanes just keep on going..... Lost count of the number of times we took things home in a bag. In fact one early glider became epoxy resin from the mid fuselage backwards...

When I was 17, the Air Cadets sent me gliding for a week, (AS K-21s now) and I managed to get solo. Then the year after that I had a couple of weeks in a civillian gliding club. And realised how much more you need to know to be a glider pilot. Then I went to university and was broke for about 10 years.

Back in early 2000 I was a bit bored one day and nipped down to my local gliding club and got a flight. And loved it! So I've been flying pretty regularly since then, got around 60 hours, and one flight of 5 hours and 20 mins.

Got a couple of kits down in the cellar at home, a hand launch RC glider, half built and a Bird of Time, a 12ft span floater, unstarted.... When I get time (i.e. no decorating, car needing fixing, etc)

Cheers
John

Nicolas
2004-Nov-10, 01:06 PM
The lawn mower deck seems to be the main lift generator indeed.

I am seriously interested in designing planes ( the whole bachelor/master is about designing planes and space components...) but I would like to fly the things too. RC is a bit too expensive, having all these other hobbies already.

I've been in contact with several astronauts already in my career (including the cosmonaut with the longest total space time). Some of them are really impressive personalities, wise or excentric at least (Q: "What do you miss most when being for such a long time in space?" A: "uhm... well, uhm, gravity" :o OK later he commented that he missed the more obvious things like his family, and just a good morning walk in the Russian woods too). Some of them have not much more than the expectation of having charisma in my opinion, which is not that much in the end...

There have been amazing people in space, but having been in space doesn't make you that amazing. With the current state of astronauts (and cosmonauts and the like of course) the average astronaut is of course seriously intelligent. But there's more to a great personality than intelligence. And boy some of these guys have a LOT more than that!!!!

Some of my lecturers have a pilot license, ranging from gliders over airforce pilots to a 767 pilot. I don't know HOW he passes his flight tests, but boy I hope he is a calmer and much, much less confused person in his good ole' cockpit! He probably is, the tests are so stringent it has to be. People can change a lot when you get them out of their natural habitat :)

BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-10, 01:48 PM
There have been amazing people in space, but having been in space doesn't make you that amazing. With the current state of astronauts (and cosmonauts and the like of course) the average astronaut is of course seriously intelligent. But there's more to a great personality than intelligence. And boy some of these guys have a LOT more than that!!!!

Same impression I got from the ones I've known. The cool part of that class was seeing the machines that have been in space, not just models, but actual space shuttles and Apollo capsules. 8)

Nicolas
2004-Nov-10, 06:48 PM
Too bad one of the astronauts that didn't quite make a lasting impression of being an amazing person is the one we see the most... but anyway I am aware of some others. Frank De Winne to name one. The best student at military school, received some medals as a (very good) F16 pilot (OK for being able to restart the engine in the sky, not totally amazing, and another event, landing without instruments or something), flown to the ISS and done scientific experiments there, being one of the best robot arm controllers, capable of flying the soyuz, speeks a multitude of languages, ambassador for aid porgrams in africa, and still such a down-to-earth (<==== PUN) person. Of course he's proud, but he stays a very normal person, just someone who tries to do his best, never completely certain of himself (he's a Belgian after all :) )

About your study:
Yes seeing the real things is indeed quite nice. I suppose those capsules and shuttle were on your field trip :D

We've got some nice artifacts in our own faculty, really good if you want to stay somewhere in a break to get inspired on a design subject. To name some nice ones:

*The REAL thermal (or vibration, I don't know) Envisat model. This is the same satellite as the Envisat flying in space, but this satellite isn't equiped with the solar panel, the remote sensing instruments and the like. For the rest, it is built exactly like the flying one, and used to measure vibration and thermal effects on the satellite. Sometimes, when the flying satellite gets a problem during construction, one of these is completed as the flying one. It's the closest you can get to Envisat these days. We've also got the thermal model from ANS.

*A Ariane5 main engine support cone

To go more airplane-way: We've got a full hangar with parts and planes.
We've got some interesting parts:
*Fokker Friendship cockpit section from an unfinished plane.
* Extra 300
* Alouette 3 helicopter
* Starfighter (without the engine but working for the rest)
* We would have an F16 if the US government would allow us to keep one at the faculty :evil:
*lots of other things like wings, a field-spraying plane, some navy plane parts from a fokker, an F16 tail, a fokker or was it Fiat with the engines mounted above the wing ...

We have lots and lots of other interesting objects, including the GLARE material test factory (as seen on the A380 :) ). GLARE was invented at our faculty.
*We've also got the SIMONA simulator.
*Sometimes we get temporary objects, such as a bomb bay door from the JSF, the official JSF simulator (with permanent guard :) ).
* We've designed and built the NUNA solar race winning vehicles, which uses among others space-flown Hubble solar pannels (only for comms energy). Sometimes a NUNA stands at the faculty.

Sitting in a starfighter is one thing, closing the canopy another. You have so little space, you really are just another component of the plane. If you'd ever wonder why pilot helmets are so small compared to motorcycle helmets...

We are affiliated with a flying school and the national air test authority. We get to fly the cessna 172 instruction plane once and the Cessna Citation II test plane (completely rebuilt inside)twice.

Now if this study wasn't so darn difficult it would be really nice :) Now all these artifacts are a very welcome change from the lectures.

BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-10, 07:50 PM
About your study:
Yes seeing the real things is indeed quite nice. I suppose those capsules and shuttle were on your field trip :D

Yes and No, the class was at the Kennedy Space Center launch facility. It included a 2 hour lecture and three hour lab including tours of the facilities and historical sites covered in the lecture. Every Friday of the Spring 2000 semester.


To go more airplane-way: We've got a full hangar with parts and planes.
We've got some interesting parts:
*Fokker Friendship cockpit section from an unfinished plane.
* Extra 300
* Alouette 3 helicopter
* Starfighter (without the engine but working for the rest)
* We would have an F16 if the US government would allow us to keep one at the faculty
*lots of other things like wings, a field-spraying plane, some navy plane parts from a fokker, an F16 tail, a fokker or was it Fiat with the engines mounted above the wing ...


You need to take a trip to the National Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio! They have a B-2 Stealth bomber on display, as well as the Boeing Bird of Prey, an F-22 Raptor, F117-A Night Hawk, a B-52, and both the F-35 JSF and he X-34 JSF. Not to mention several Wright Co. Planes, and almost every war bird you can think of. And all the former Air Force Ones. The museum is four complete hangars one for each era of flight history. If you walk fast and only look at the planes it takes 2 days, if you take your time and read everything expect to take 3 or 4.

Nicolas
2004-Nov-10, 08:05 PM
Yes I'm aware of that museum. Pure history in hangars. What I was talking about was our own private university collection at my faculty building, 1 minute walking from my main lecture room. We've got some nice museums here too, but of course belgium or the netherlands can't hold anything like Ohio. We've got a nice museum here nearby in the netherlands, displaying a V1 amongst others. Beautiful museum.

BlueAnodizeAl
2004-Nov-10, 08:15 PM
Yes I'm aware of that museum. Pure history in hangars. What I was talking about was our own private university collection at my faculty building, 1 minute walking from my main lecture room. We've got some nice museums here too, but of course belgium or the netherlands can't hold anything like Ohio. We've got a nice museum here nearby in the netherlands, displaying a V1 amongst others. Beautiful museum.

The only thing I'm aware of in our "collection" is a loan exhibit of a WWII simulator for solo instrument training.

Nicolas
2004-Nov-10, 08:28 PM
There is an awful difference between university collections. I once visited another university where I thought I might go studying. they went totally crazy because they had a real airbus A320 slat guide!!! one [1]. That was about it. Where I'm now these slat guides are lying on a small heap aside if you know what I mean. We've got all kinds of objects standing in the halways between the lecturer's offices. DC10 leading edges (parts, not 50 meters of them :), but including de-icing system), cessna steering columns, jumpseats, sport plane tails, helicopter rotors (blades cut off), all available while waiting for turning in a paper :)

Because our faculty is very active in aerospace research too, it has good contacts with the industry and defence, and hence can aquire lots of objects. Defence has already twice sent in an F16 on a truck... for just 1 day!!