PDA

View Full Version : Seti@Home to help map jydrogen distribution!



David Hall
2001-Nov-11, 06:19 AM
Now this is cool (to me at least)! I've always wondered if the data gathered by the Seti@Home program could be used for any other purposes besides looking for ET. Now I see that they are doing just that. They are planning to take the data gathered and use it to map the distribution of hydrogen in our galaxy.

http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/newsletters/newsletter10.html

So even if you think looking for alien signals is a waste of time, you can't say that Seti@Home is completely useless. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

<font=-1><pre>
<u>My Stats</u>
Results Received 1491
Total CPU Time 1.842 years
Avg. CPU Time/unit 10 hr 49 min 17.1 sec
SETI@home user for: 2.485 years
Your rank out of
3363264 total users is: 53418th place
The number of users
who have this rank: 44
You have completed
more work units than 98.410% of our users
</pre>

2001-Nov-11, 08:13 AM
[quote]
On 2001-11-11 01:19, David Hall wrote:


http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/newsletters/newsletter10.html



<font=-1><pre>
<u>My Stats</u>
Results Received 1491
Total CPU Time 1.842 years
Avg. CPU Time/unit 10 hr 49 min 17.1 sec
SETI@home user for: 2.485 years
Your rank out of
3363264 total users is: 53418th place
The number of users
who have this rank: 44
You have completed
more work units than 98.410% of our users
</pre>
1:48 A.M. PST HUb' resopnce:
berkeley? HOME of BSD maybe theres a link line?
bsd (http://www.freebsd.org/handbook/install-guide.html)

Hat Monster
2001-Nov-11, 08:27 PM
User: Hat Monster
Group: Team Ars Technica Lamb Chop
Registered: 06/02/2000
Results returned: 1653
Last result returned: 11/11/2001 09:02:04
Total CPU time: 3.48 yrs
Avg. CPU time: 18:28:39
Result interval: 9:20:43
CPU dedication: 1.977
Rank: 47,210 of 3,363,085 (98.596%)
Users with this rank: 24

Averaging ten per day.

Wiley
2001-Nov-12, 07:27 PM
Name (and URL) Wiley
Results Received 768
Total CPU Time 1.808 years
Average CPU Time per work unit 20 hr 37 min 34.9 sec
Last result returned:Mon Nov 12 09:43:33 2001 UTC Registered on:Wed May 19 17:28:57 1999
UTC SETI@home user for: 2.488 years

Your rank out of 3366730 total users is: 112481st place.
The number of users who have this rank: 141
You have completed more work units than 96.655% of our users.

Azpod
2001-Nov-12, 10:17 PM
Name (and URL) Azpod
Results Received 1377
Total CPU Time 1.495 years
Average CPU Time per work unit 9 hr 30 min 28.9 sec
Last result returned: Mon Nov 12 21:54:08 2001 UTC
Registered on: Sat Jul 8 01:27:24 2000 UTC
SETI@home user for: 1.351 years

Your rank out of 3367067 total users is: 58949th place.
The number of users who have this rank: 45
You have completed more work units than 98.248% of our users.

Edited to make it readable (cut & paste bad)
/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_cool.gif

_________________
Just my two neurons worth,
Azpod... Formerly known as James Justin


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Azpod on 2001-11-12 17:28 ]</font>

ToSeek
2001-Nov-13, 02:09 PM
Read it and weep! ;-)

Your credit:
Name (and URL)
Kevin Parker
Results Received 24840
Total CPU Time 27.348 years
Average CPU Time per work unit 9 hr 38 min 40.1 sec
Last result returned: Mon Nov 12 15:29:53 2001 UTC
Registered on: Wed May 19 14:55:01 1999 UTC
SETI@home user for: 2.491 years
Your group info:
You belong to the group named: The Planetary Society

Your rank: (based on current workunits received)
Your rank out of 3368133 total users is: 734th place.
The number of users who have this rank: 1
You have completed more work units than 99.978% of our users.

Hat Monster
2001-Nov-15, 07:27 PM
Damn you ToSeek! You stole my delusions of grandeur!

Bob
2001-Nov-15, 08:37 PM
So where's the beef?

J-Man
2001-Nov-16, 07:23 PM
So how many hours have you spent just watching the spectrum graph?

/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

ToSeek
2001-Nov-16, 07:53 PM
On 2001-11-15 14:27, Hat Monster wrote:
Damn you ToSeek! You stole my delusions of grandeur!

/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_razz.gif

(There are advantages to being an assistant network administrator, as I was for a while at my last job. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif )

David Hall
2001-Dec-17, 05:31 AM
Here's another use for the Seti data. Unfortunately, they can only use the raw data, because they are looking for a different type of signal. So all the data processing by us @homers is useless to them.

http://www.planetary.org/html/UPDATES/seti/SETI@home/Update_110501.htm

Interesting idea though, looking for evaporating black holes. It's nice to see the seti data going to good use.

Azpod
2001-Dec-17, 05:51 PM
On 2001-12-17 00:31, David Hall wrote:
Here's another use for the Seti data. Unfortunately, they can only use the raw data, because they are looking for a different type of signal. So all the data processing by us @homers is useless to them.

http://www.planetary.org/html/UPDATES/seti/SETI@home/Update_110501.htm

Interesting idea though, looking for evaporating black holes. It's nice to see the seti data going to good use.


A few questions about this. On the website, I saw the following:


Scientists need to look for an extremely short radio burst, perhaps as brief as one millionth of a second. The signal, furthermore, would be of a very wide frequency band. It is, in a way, the exact opposite of the signal SETI@home was designed to look for.


Wouldn't it be very hard to confirm this signal's extraterrestrial origin? A brief signal spread over a wide spectrum could be something from any energetic burst, including a lightning strike here on Earth.

Also, don't BHs evaporate until their mass can no longer maintain an event horizon? In theory, a BH the mass of a bowling ball would still be stable. The energetic bursts would come from BHs with the mass of only a few atoms, at most. How would that be detectable from Earth?

[Edit: made readable]

_________________
Just FYI-- lobster sticks to magnet.
That is all.

--Azpod... Formerly known as James Justin

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Azpod on 2001-12-17 12:57 ]</font>

ToSeek
2001-Dec-17, 08:06 PM
On 2001-12-17 12:51, Azpod wrote:
Also, don't BHs evaporate until their mass can no longer maintain an event horizon? In theory, a BH the mass of a bowling ball would still be stable. The energetic bursts would come from BHs with the mass of only a few atoms, at most. How would that be detectable from Earth?


I don't think there's any such thing as a stable black hole - they'll all evaporate, given enough time.

And the figure I usually hear (http://www.sciencenet.org.uk/slup/CuttingEdge/May00/string.html) about the size of the miniature black holes that might still be around is on the order of a billion tons, though it might be only the size of a bowling ball.

David Hall
2003-Jan-31, 12:28 PM
Hey all, I just thought I'd dig up this old thread, as there's been an update to the hydrogen survey posted on the Seti site. Check it out.

http://www.planetary.org/html/UPDATES/seti/SETI@home/Update_012403.html

GrapesOfWrath
2003-Jan-31, 12:47 PM
Where would we be if we couldn't resurrect these great old topics? "They who ignore history are doomed to..."

g99
2003-Feb-01, 12:26 AM
toseek 27 years? How is that possible. You were only a member for two.

I had been a member since it started, but i stopped for a year and a bit because it got old for me. I am back now. Altought i am way down on the list i am too embaresed to say what it is /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif.

David Hall
2003-Feb-01, 10:02 AM
On 2003-01-31 19:26, g99 wrote:

toseek 27 years? How is that possible. You were only a member for two.


Look here (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?topic=613&forum=2&start=25) for your answer, and more recent standings as well. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

_________________
...And that, my liege, is how we know the Earth to be banana-shaped. --Sir Bedevere

<font size="-1">(slight mistake in the URL)</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: David Hall on 2003-02-01 05:03 ]</font>